Featured Stories
 

‘We Need To Talk About Dublin’

The International Organisation for Migration has said that over a million migrants and refugees have reached Europe in 2015. The legal instrument envisaged for examining asylum claims within the European Union has proven shamefully inadequate to the task. A BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO THE DUBLIN SYSTEM The Dublin system was originally introduced by the Dublin Convention, […]

On Global Jamais-vu: Rejection at the Frontier and the Non-Refoulement Paradox

Non-refoulement refers to the idea that those fleeing persecution on account of their ‘race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion’ should not be forced to return where they will be subjected to further persecution; fundamental to both the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees and the 1967 Protocol […]

ICC Approves Georgia Investigation

On 27th January 2016, Pre-Trial Chamber 1 of the International Criminal Court (ICC) approved the Prosecutor’s application to investigate crimes within Georgia. Under Article 15 of the Rome Statute, when the Prosecutor initiates an investigation proprio motu (that is, of their own accord without UN Security Council or state referral), she must seek the approval […]

A legal analysis of UN Security Council resolution 2249

On Friday 20th November, the United Nations Security Council adopted resolution 2249 calling on UN members to take “all necessary measures” in redoubling and coordinating the prevention and suppression of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria. Some may long to interpret this resolution as a green light for all-out war; nonetheless, this is one […]

The South China Sea Saga Continues

Introduction On 29 October 2015, the Arbitral Tribunal constituted under Annex VII of the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (“LOSC”) on the initiative of the Philippines rendered its highly anticipated Award on Jurisdiction and Admissibility in the Philippines v China case. The Tribunal found itself competent to rule on seven […]

‘We Need To Talk About Dublin’

21 March 2016

The International Organisation for Migration has said that over a million migrants and refugees have reached Europe in 2015. The legal instrument envisaged for examining asylum claims within the European Union has proven shamefully inadequate to the task. A BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO THE DUBLIN SYSTEM The Dublin system was originally introduced by the Dublin Convention, […]

Read the full story

Posted in Current Affairs, Human Rights, War0 Comments

On Global Jamais-vu: Rejection at the Frontier and the Non-Refoulement Paradox

21 March 2016

Non-refoulement refers to the idea that those fleeing persecution on account of their ‘race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion’ should not be forced to return where they will be subjected to further persecution; fundamental to both the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees and the 1967 Protocol […]

Read the full story

Posted in Current Affairs, Human Rights, War0 Comments

ICC Approves Georgia Investigation

21 March 2016

On 27th January 2016, Pre-Trial Chamber 1 of the International Criminal Court (ICC) approved the Prosecutor’s application to investigate crimes within Georgia. Under Article 15 of the Rome Statute, when the Prosecutor initiates an investigation proprio motu (that is, of their own accord without UN Security Council or state referral), she must seek the approval […]

Read the full story

Posted in Current Affairs, Procedure, War0 Comments

A legal analysis of UN Security Council resolution 2249

27 February 2016

On Friday 20th November, the United Nations Security Council adopted resolution 2249 calling on UN members to take “all necessary measures” in redoubling and coordinating the prevention and suppression of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria. Some may long to interpret this resolution as a green light for all-out war; nonetheless, this is one […]

Read the full story

Posted in Current Affairs, Human Rights, War0 Comments

The South China Sea Saga Continues

27 February 2016

Introduction On 29 October 2015, the Arbitral Tribunal constituted under Annex VII of the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (“LOSC”) on the initiative of the Philippines rendered its highly anticipated Award on Jurisdiction and Admissibility in the Philippines v China case. The Tribunal found itself competent to rule on seven […]

Read the full story

Posted in Current Affairs, Sea and Water, Territory1 Comment

International Law versus Politics: Focus on Israel and Palestine

27 February 2016

International law is designed to govern the behaviour of states and individuals who act in the name of those states. Pragmatic and sometimes self-serving political agendas can undermine this intention or simply prevent the application of penalties that international law calls for. In recent history, the development of attempts to establish an agreed framework of […]

Read the full story

Posted in Current Affairs, Procedure, Territory, War0 Comments

Compensation for illegal sex slavery- in light of recent Korean Supreme Court case

09 December 2015

Korea recently played host to the Prime Minister of Japan. A considerable time had lapsed since the last meeting between these two leaders in May 2012. Some  attributed the delay to the conflicting opinions on certain legal issues. There was much speculation at the outset of the summit as to whether these long-standing legal issues, […]

Read the full story

Posted in Current Affairs, Human Rights0 Comments

The House of Saud and the English Court: The Harb Saga

24 November 2015

The efforts of Janan Harb, a widow of the late King Fahd of Saudi Arabia, to obtain her share of the King’s estate through the English courts have given rise to two novel questions of international law. First, is the estate of a Head of State who died in office immune from legal action? Second, […]

Read the full story

Posted in Current Affairs, Domestic Courts, Human Rights, Int'l Legal Theory0 Comments

The Buddhas of Bamiyan, Timbuktu, Palmyra: What next?

20 November 2015

Earlier this year, the French President Francois Hollande, along with UNESCO’s Director General, said “We stand together” in an effort to express solidarity to people that suffer the destruction of their cultural heritage (see here). But where do we really stand, if not passively watching the destruction of the world’s cultural elements? Since 2001, when […]

Read the full story

Posted in Current Affairs, Human Rights, Treaties, War0 Comments

David V. Goliath – The Republic of Marshall Islands’ Day in Court

02 November 2015

The Republic of Marshall Islands (‘RMI’) is an island nation, located in the Pacific Ocean, with a population of 68,840 people. On the 24th April 2014, the RMI filed a dispute before the International Court of Justice (‘ICJ’), against 9 states, namely, the United States, United Kingdom, France, Russia, China, India, Pakistan, Israel, and North […]

Read the full story

Posted in Current Affairs, Procedure1 Comment

Is the International Court of Justice an Option for Ukraine in Light of the Conflict with Russia?

01 October 2015

On 4 July 2015, the Ukraine’s State Portal of Public Procurement issued Report no. 152973/5 “On results of negotiating public procurement procedure”, according to which Ukraine hired International Law Firm «Covington & Burling LLP» to work on the “protection of rights and interests of Ukraine in the settlement of international disputes involving Ukraine and other […]

Read the full story

Posted in Current Affairs, Human Rights, Procedure1 Comment

Safe Harbor in stormy seas: The Advocate General Opinion in Schrems

29 September 2015

On 23 September 2015, Advocate General Yves Bot delivered his opinion in Schrems v. Data Protection Commissioner (Case C-362/14), one of the most significant data protection cases ever to come before the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU). In his opinion, AG Bot found that the national data protection authorities (DPAs) must be […]

Read the full story

Posted in Current Affairs2 Comments

CJICL Vol. 4(1) Now Published

16 September 2015

The CJICL has just published Vol. 4(1). All articles of this latest issue can be accessed in the journal archive. The following is the editorial of the issue’s editors-in-chief Ana Júlia Maurício and Naomi Hart. It has been a pleasure to steward the Cambridge Journal of International and Comparative Law through its fourth year. The Journal has the unusual distinction among […]

Read the full story

Posted in Current Affairs0 Comments

Sovereignty Disputes under UNCLOS: Some Thoughts and Remarks on the Chagos Marine Protected Area Dispute

07 August 2015

On 18 March 2015, an arbitral tribunal constituted under Annex VII of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (‘UNCLOS’) rendered a decision on the dispute between the United Kingdom and Mauritius relating to the Chagos Marine Protected Area. The dispute arose in 2010 after the United Kingdom unilaterally decided to create […]

Read the full story

Posted in Current Affairs0 Comments

Book review: Gus Waschefort, International Law and Child Soldiers

18 June 2015

As part of the series Studies in International Law, Hart Publishing has recently published International Law and Child Soldiers by Gus Waschefort. The central argument in this book is that international law has a role to play in the prevention of child soldiering and that its focus should shift from norm creation to norm enforcement. […]

Read the full story

Posted in Current Affairs, Human Rights, War0 Comments

The Gröning Case – What Constitutes “Aiding” in the Context of Systematic Human Rights Violations?

15 June 2015

In January 1945, Soviet forces liberated the survivors of Auschwitz, one of Nazi Germany’s most infamous concentration camps. 70 years later, 93 year old Oskar Gröning, who worked as a bookkeeper in the camp, is standing trial for aiding 300.000 cases of murder committed in Auschwitz. The trial is the first outcome of a recent […]

Read the full story

Posted in Current Affairs, Domestic Courts, Human Rights0 Comments

(C) John Ward

Protecting the Power of the Keystroke: Key Takeaways from the Indian Supreme Court’s Decision Striking Down Censorship of Cyber Speech

04 June 2015

Over the last two decades, the internet has fundamentally transformed the ways in which individuals communicate and has emerged as one of the most important sites of heated contestations about the contemporary challenges that communities across the globe are confronting. Not only has the internet allowed citizens to fundamentally restructure the meaning of democracy by […]

Read the full story

Posted in Current Affairs, Domestic Courts, Human Rights1 Comment

Safe Harbor before the EU Court of Justice

13 April 2015

On 24 March 2015, the Court of Justice of the European Union (“CJEU”) held an oral hearing in the case Schrems v. Data Protection Commissioner (Case C-362/14), which deals with the legality of data transfers to the US under the EU-US Safe Harbor system. While the case has attracted considerable public attention, there has been […]

Read the full story

Posted in Current Affairs, Domestic Courts, Human Rights, Treaties4 Comments

Selected Title

Latest from the International Law Reporter

Contact the CJICL

General enquiries: editors@cjicl.org.uk

Conference enquiries: conference@cjicl.org.uk

CJICL Online enquiries: blog@cjicl.org.uk

 

For journal submissions use this form. The blog team welcomes submissions at: blog@cjicl.org.uk

Online Authors