Center for Korean Studies http://cksnews.manoa.hawaii.edu/wp University of Hawaii at Manoa Fri, 19 May 2017 00:58:17 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://i2.wp.com/cksnews.manoa.hawaii.edu/wp/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/cropped-endart01.png?fit=32%2C32 Center for Korean Studies http://cksnews.manoa.hawaii.edu/wp 32 32 42577860 21.31275-157.821954http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/ SSRC 2017 Korean Studies Dissertation Workshop Scheduled for August http://cksnews.manoa.hawaii.edu/wp/ssrc-2017-korean-studies-dissertation-workshop-scheduled-august/ http://cksnews.manoa.hawaii.edu/wp/ssrc-2017-korean-studies-dissertation-workshop-scheduled-august/#respond Thu, 18 May 2017 02:05:17 +0000 http://cksnews.manoa.hawaii.edu/wp/?p=11599 The 2017 Social Science Research Council (SSRC) Korean Studies Dissertation Workshop will take place August 11-15 at the Hilton Westchester in Rye Brook, New York. The workshop is intended to create a network of advanced graduate students and faculty by … Continue reading

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SSRC dissertation workshop
The 2017 Social Science Research Council (SSRC) Korean Studies Dissertation Workshop will take place August 11-15 at the Hilton Westchester in Rye Brook, New York. The workshop is intended to create a network of advanced graduate students and faculty by providing an opportunity for exchange of critical feedback on dissertations in progress. Twelve students will be selected to work with three faculty members during the program.

The workshop invites applications from students in all fields in the social sciences and humanities who have not yet begun fieldwork, who are currently in the field, or who are in the process of writing their dissertations.

Full-time advanced graduate students, regardless of citizenship, are eligible to participate in the workshop. Applicants must have ABD (all but dissertation) status and an approved dissertation prospectus at the time of application, but cannot have completed writing for final submission. Special consideration will be given to students from universities that are not major Korean studies institutions. The deadline for applications is June 15, 2017.

This year’s faculty mentors are Suzy Kim of Rutgers University; Robert Oppenheim of the University of Texas, Austin; and Youngju Ryu of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

To the extent its budget allows, SSRC will cover all travel to the workshop and will fully cover participants’ lodging and meals for the duration of the workshop. The Academy of Korean Studies is providing funding for the program.

For further information about the workshop, see http://www.ssrc.org/fellowships/view/ksdw/ or contact the Social Science Research Council at 300 Cadman Plaza West, 15th Floor, Brooklyn, N.Y. 11201.

For the application form and related instructions, see https://s3.amazonaws.com/ssrc-cdn2/2017-ksdw-application-5900e9221d5c4.pdf.

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New Center Book Explores Catholicism in Chosŏn Korea http://cksnews.manoa.hawaii.edu/wp/new-center-book-explores-catholicism-choson-korea/ http://cksnews.manoa.hawaii.edu/wp/new-center-book-explores-catholicism-choson-korea/#comments Mon, 15 May 2017 21:59:23 +0000 http://cksnews.manoa.hawaii.edu/wp/?p=11583 The Center for Korean Studies and the University of Hawai‘i Press have released the fifteenth volume in their Hawai‘i Studies on Korea series: Catholics and Anti-Catholicism in Chosŏn Korea by Don Baker with Franklin Rausch. The book is available now … Continue reading

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Catholics and Anti-Catholicism cover
The Center for Korean Studies and the University of Hawai‘i Press have released the fifteenth volume in their Hawai‘i Studies on Korea series: Catholics and Anti-Catholicism in Chosŏn Korea by Don Baker with Franklin Rausch.

The book is available now from the University of Hawai‘i Press directly or though book dealers. The principal author, Don Baker, is professor of Korean civilization in the Department of Asian Studies at the University of British Columbia. His co-author, Franklin Rausch, is an assistant professor in the Department of History and Philosophy at Lander University in Greenwood, South Carolina.

Korea’s first significant encounter with the West occurred with the emergence of a Korean Catholic community in the last quarter of the eighteenth century. Decades of persecution followed, resulting in the deaths of thousands of Korean Catholics. In this book, Baker provides an analysis of late-Chosŏn (1392–1897) thought, politics, and society to help readers understand the response of Confucians to Catholicism and of Korean Catholics to years of violent harassment.

Baker’s analysis is informed by two important documents translated with the assistance of Franklin Rausch and annotated here for the first time: an anti-Catholic essay written in the 1780s by Confucian scholar Ahn Chŏngbok (1712–1791) and a firsthand account of the 1801 anti-Catholic persecution by one of its last victims, the religious leader Hwang Sayŏng (1775–1801).

Ahn’s essay, Conversation on Catholicism, reveals Confucian assumptions about Catholicism. It is based on the scholar’s exchanges with his son-in-law, who joined the small group of Catholics in the 1780s. Ahn argues that Catholicism is immoral because it puts more importance on the salvation of one’s soul than on what is best for one’s family or community. Conspicuously absent from his Conversation is the reason behind the conversions of his son-in-law and a few other young Confucian intellectuals.

Baker examines numerous Confucian texts of the time to argue that, in the late eighteenth century, Korean Confucians were tormented by a growing concern over human moral frailty. Some came to view Catholicism as a way to overcome moral weakness, become virtuous, and, in the process, gain eternal life. These anxieties are echoed in Hwang’s Silk Letter, in which he details for the bishop in Beijing his persecution and the decade preceding it. He explains why Koreans joined (and some abandoned) the Catholic faith and their devotion to the new religion in the face of torture and execution.

These two texts together reveal much about not only Korean beliefs and values of two centuries ago, but also how Koreans viewed their country and their king as well as China and its culture.

For more information about this and other titles in the Hawai‘i Studies on Korea series, follow this link.

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China’s Korean Policy Under Xi Jinping http://cksnews.manoa.hawaii.edu/wp/chinas-korean-policy-xi-jinping/ http://cksnews.manoa.hawaii.edu/wp/chinas-korean-policy-xi-jinping/#respond Fri, 12 May 2017 02:35:52 +0000 http://cksnews.manoa.hawaii.edu/wp/?p=11575 Calling North Korea’s nuclear weapons program “an urgent national security threat and top foreign policy priority,” American officials are emphasizing the critical role of China in pressuring Pyongyang to denuclearize. President Donald Trump, who long criticized China for “having done … Continue reading

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Calling North Korea’s nuclear weapons program “an urgent national security threat and top foreign policy priority,” American officials are emphasizing the critical role of China in pressuring Pyongyang to denuclearize. President Donald Trump, who long criticized China for “having done little to help,” now praises Chinese leader Xi Jinping. But has China’s North Korea policy actually changed that dramatically?

Wang Jianwei photoThat’s the fundamental question Professor Jianwei Wang of the University of Macao will take up in a brown bag seminar presentation sponsored by the East-West Center Research Program Thursday, May 18, 2017. The seminar will take place from 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. in Burns Hall room 3012.

Wang, who is currently a POSCO visiting fellow at the East-West Center, will examine the extent to which Xi Jinping’s Korean policy differs from the policies of his predecessors. In particular, he will look at Xi’s approach to balance relations with North Korea and South Korea, how his Korean policy influences Sino-American relations, and the prospects of more consequential cooperation between the United States and China on North Korea?

Jianwei Wang is a professor in the Department of Government and Public Administration and director of the Institute of Global and Public Affairs at the University of Macao. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan. His teaching and research focus on Sino-American relations, Chinese foreign policy, and East Asian international relations. He has published extensively in these areas.

For further information, contact Cynthia Nakachi (nakachic@eastwestcenter.org) in the East-West Center Program Office.

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Korea’s Great Transformation and Hagen Koo’s Sociological Journey http://cksnews.manoa.hawaii.edu/wp/koreas-great-transformation-hagen-koos-sociological-journey/ http://cksnews.manoa.hawaii.edu/wp/koreas-great-transformation-hagen-koos-sociological-journey/#respond Fri, 21 Apr 2017 01:34:28 +0000 http://cksnews.manoa.hawaii.edu/wp/?p=6707 In the past half century, South Korea has transformed itself from a poor agricultural country into a highly industrialized and globalized society. Throughout this transformation, Hagen Koo, professor of sociology at the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, has been studying … Continue reading

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Hagen KooIn the past half century, South Korea has transformed itself from a poor agricultural country into a highly industrialized and globalized society.

Throughout this transformation, Hagen Koo, professor of sociology at the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, has been studying and writing about the remarkable social changes Korea has experienced.

Now, on the eve of his retirement, Professor Koo will offer a lecture reflecting on his past research endeavors and the trends of sociological theories that have influenced his work.

He will speak May 11, 2017, at 4:00 p.m. in the Center for Korean Studies auditorium.

Hagen KooHagen Koo is a graduate of Seoul National University and received his Ph.D. in sociology at Northwestern University in 1974. His association with the University of Hawai‘i started the following year. Then a faculty member at Memphis State University, he participated in the second major conference staged by the recently created UH Center for Korean Studies, a multidisciplinary conference on South Korea. Koo subsequently spent the 1978‒1979 academic year at Mānoa as a visiting professor in the Sociology Department, and in 1981 he joined the UH faculty.

The author of numerous articles and chapters in his field, he has also produced notable books. His Korean Workers: The Culture and Politics of Class Formation (Cornell University Press, 2001) won the American Sociological Association’s award for the most distinguished book published on Asia during 2001‒2003. The book has been translated into Korean, Chinese, Japanese, and Thai.

Other works include the edited volumes State and Society in Contemporary Korea (Cornell University Press, 1993) and (with Kim Keong-il and Kim Jun) Modern Korean Labor: A Sourcebook (Academy of Korean Studies Press, 2015).

Koo describes his current research as being focused on the nature of economic development and neoliberal globalization in East Asia. In particular, he is interested in the ways structural changes generate new forms of class inequality and institutional changes in East Asian societies.

He is currently working on a book tentatively titled Cosmopolitan Anxiety: South Korea’s Globalized Middle Class in which he is exploring “the ways the South Korean middle class has changed significantly as a consequence of neoliberal globalization—from a relatively homogeneous and upwardly mobile class to an internally polarized, anxiety ridden, and politically unpredictable class.”

Center for Korean Studies events are free and open to all. For further information, including information regarding access for the handicapped, telephone the Center at (808) 956-7041. The University of Hawai‘i is an equal opportunity/affirmative action Institution.

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Chair in Korean Studies at the University of Iowa http://cksnews.manoa.hawaii.edu/wp/chair-korean-studies-university-iowa/ http://cksnews.manoa.hawaii.edu/wp/chair-korean-studies-university-iowa/#respond Thu, 13 Apr 2017 03:44:25 +0000 http://cksnews.manoa.hawaii.edu/wp/?p=6677 The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and International Programs at the University of Iowa invite applications for the position of C. Maxwell and Elizabeth M. Stanley Family and Korea Foundation Chair in Korean Studies at the full professor or … Continue reading

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University of Iowa logoThe College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and International Programs at the University of Iowa invite applications for the position of C. Maxwell and Elizabeth M. Stanley Family and Korea Foundation Chair in Korean Studies at the full professor or senior associate professor level to begin in the fall of 2018.

Applicants must be specialists in a humanities or social science discipline, must have primary research and teaching expertise in Korean studies, and may also have interdisciplinary or supranational research interests.

Appointment will be to an appropriate disciplinary department. The successful applicant will also hold a 0% appointment in International Programs and is expected to participate in the activities of the Center for Asian and Pacific Studies. Review processes, teaching assignments, and primary responsibility for mentorship will reside within the department of appointment. This is an endowed, fully tenured, position with a reduced teaching load and annual research funds.

Applicants must demonstrate a record of excellence in scholarship and teaching commensurate with a position at the senior associate professor or full professor levels and be able to teach courses that meet the needs of the department of appointment as well as complement existing strengths within the department and college. Applicants must also demonstrate a level of language fluency in both English and Korean appropriate for research and teaching.

Review of applications will begin October 1, 2017.

To apply, visit https://jobs.uiowa.edu/content/faculty/ and reference Requisition #70718.

Requested application materials include a letter of interest; curriculum vitae; representative writing sample; and names and contact information of three references. Letters of recommendation will be requested only for short-listed candidates.

For more information contact: Alaina R. Hanson (alaina-hanson@uiowa.edu), Administration, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, or Morten Schlütter (morten-schlutter@uiowa.edu), chair of search committee and director, Center for Asian and Pacific Studies.

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Non-tenure Track Teaching Position at Hankuk University of Foreign Studies http://cksnews.manoa.hawaii.edu/wp/non-tenure-track-teaching-position-hankuk-university-foreign-studies/ http://cksnews.manoa.hawaii.edu/wp/non-tenure-track-teaching-position-hankuk-university-foreign-studies/#respond Thu, 13 Apr 2017 03:04:34 +0000 http://cksnews.manoa.hawaii.edu/wp/?p=6669 The Department of Korean Studies at Hankuk University of Foreign Studies (Yongin-si, South Korea) invites applications for a full-time, one-year, non-tenure-track teaching position (with possible multiple renewals) to begin in September 2017. The University hires only non-Korean citizens for the … Continue reading

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Hankuk University of Foreign Studies logoThe Department of Korean Studies at Hankuk University of Foreign Studies (Yongin-si, South Korea) invites applications for a full-time, one-year, non-tenure-track teaching position (with possible multiple renewals) to begin in September 2017. The University hires only non-Korean citizens for the position.

Applicants must have a Ph.D. in Korean studies, particularly social sciences, cultural studies, and media studies, at the time of appointment and native or near-native fluency in English and Korean. ABD applicants are guaranteed full consideration. Applicants with a strong research profile will be preferred.

The appointee will teach an average of three undergraduate courses per semester (minimum eight hours per week) in the Department of Korean Studies. The language of instruction is English.

The rank and salary will be commensurate with the appointee’s qualifications and experience and will be decided at the time of appointment according to the University’s employment code. As of 2017, the annual salary is approximately $36,250 to $54,250. The University will provide competitive funding for research projects and on-campus housing.

Interested candidates should submit letter of application, curriculum vitae (including information regarding nationality or visa status), teaching statement, one writing sample, and one recommendation letter directly to the Department chair, Dr. Hyonhui Choe (hhchoe@hufs.ac.kr). The required documents (except recommendation letter) must be in one PDF file and named in following manner: Lastname_hufs_apply.pdf. One recommendation letter can be sent to Dr. Choe directly from the referee or via a dossier service.

All applications received by May 1, 2017, are guaranteed full consideration. Successful candidates may be asked to be interviewed via Skype or in person in early May.

For further information, contact the search committee chair: Dr. Hyonhui Choe (hhchoe@hufs.ac.kr), telephone: +82-31-330-4671. Department office: 81 Oedae-ro, Mohyeon-myeon, Cheoin-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 17035, South Korea (telephone: +82-31-330-4217).

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