Faculty Blogs

Entering Jerusalem from the East

By Sister Ann Astell

Participating in a Mass from a chapel overlooking Jerusalem during a Spring Break pilgrimage to the Holy Land, the writer remembers how Jesus wept over the city from that very same spot. The vision was both beautiful and terrifying.

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Wounds

By A.P. Monta

Frank, my brother-in-law, works in the emergency room of a medical center in Arkansas. About twice a year our families get together for the holidays. We catch up on news, share meals and hear how Frank comes to terms with carnage.

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What I’m Reading: Love & Salt: A Spiritual Friendship Shared in Letters, Amy Andrews and Jessica Mesman Griffith

By Kenneth Garcia ’08Ph.D.

Today, the art of letter writing has been largely lost. One can, of course, fairly ask: Who needs to write letters anymore, with the advent of email, text messaging and Facebook? Well, two young women writers — Amy Andrews and Jessica Mesman Griffith — discovered the need or, rather, the spiritual need to do so.

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Electing the President 2016: The Democrats' Dilemma

By Robert Schmuhl ’70

When they went to bed on election night, most Americans — even in GOP quarters — thought the outcome of 2016 was a foregone conclusion. But by the time the presidential and other electoral results became known, it was the Democrats who were left wondering what their party’s fortunes might be.

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Electing the President 2016: Saddle up the Tiger

By Robert Schmuhl ’70

At age 70, the president-elect faces a new reality that couldn’t be more different from his decades as a developer or even his nearly 18 months as a political candidate. Showing up at the Oval Office each morning to “just see what develops,” in a phrase taken from his 1987 bestseller, The Art of the Deal, probably won’t suffice as a strategy for serving as president of the United States.

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Electing the President 2016: The View from Abroad

By Robert Schmuhl ’70

Being an American abroad these days provides someone with a perplexing yet recurring experience. Wherever you go, people beyond our shores want to know why the American presidential campaign is approaching its conclusion as a political popularity contest between two historically unpopular candidates.

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Electing the President 2016: The Evil of Two Lessers

By Robert Schmuhl ’70

At the beginning of class the other day, I circulated a questionnaire for the 26 duly-enrolled Millennial Domers in my course on American Political and Media Culture. Besides wanting to know their partisan and ideological preferences, their pushing-70 teacher wanted to gauge student opinion about contemporary political figures and this year’s presidential free-for-all from the anonymous surveys.

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Electing the President 2016: What Unites Us

By Robert Schmuhl ’70

Now that the Republican and Democratic national conventions are history, one common denominator of the 2016 presidential campaign stands out in bold relief. Both major parties this fall will be united by high-decibel hatred of the nominee of the other party.

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Ted's Top Ten Films

By Ted Barron

Notre Dame Magazine congratulates Ted Barron on the announcement of his appointment as executive director of the DeBartolo Center for the Performing Arts. Back in 2011, when Barron was the director of the center’s popular Browning Cinema, we asked him to compile this list of his favorite films.

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Why I Take Architecture Students to Flanders

By Philip Bess

I awoke in South Bend on Tuesday, March 22, to the dismaying news of the terrorist attack in Belgium, sobered all the more by my calculation that one week earlier, at the same time, my five urban design students, a colleague and I were in the exact place where the two suicide bombers detonated themselves in Brussels Airport.

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