51.2 F
Aberdeen
Home Blog

Aberdeen Police Release Photo of Possible Suspect Vehicle After Attempted Kidnapping Reported

Aberdeen Police are seeking tips and possibly home security camera footage from the area where an attempted kidnapping was reported earlier this month. They’ve released a photo of the truck reported leaving the area, in the 500 block of East 1st Street, around 12:30 PM Saturday afternoon May 11th.

Detectives received a tip from a local business this week with that footage, and are hoping that other systems in the area may have captured a license plate or more details. It appears to be a red, Chevrolet full size extended cab truck, possibly newer than a 2000 model. We ask that anyone with video cameras in the area please check your footage from 5-11-19 and contact Detective Lougheed at the Aberdeen Police Department, 360-533-3180, if you have any information.

Don’t Let Your Campfire Become a Wildfire

Sitting around a campfire is one of the special times we all enjoy, but campfires are also a major cause of wildfires. May is Wildfire Awareness Month, and the Pacific Northwest Coordination Group urges campers to follow these basic outdoor safety tips:

·         Know before you go

Before going camping, always contact the forest district, agency or landowner first to learn if there are any current campfire restrictions where you plan to recreate.

·         Have water and fire tools on site

Bring a shovel and a bucket of water to extinguish any escaped embers. When you are ready to leave, drown all embers with water, stir the coals, and drown again. Repeat until the fire is DEAD out. If it is too hot to touch, it is too hot to leave.

·         Select the right spot

Where campfires are allowed, choose a site with an existing ring. Fire pits in established campgrounds are the best spots. If you choose to build a campfire, avoid building it near your tent, structures, vehicles, shrubs or trees, and be aware of low-hanging branches overhead. Clear the site down to bare soil, at least five feet on all sides, and circle it with rocks. Store unused firewood a good distance from the fire. 

·         Keep your campfire small

A campfire is less likely to escape control if it is kept small. A large fire may cast hot embers long distances. Add firewood in small amounts as existing material is consumed. 

·         Attend your campfire at all times

A campfire left unattended for even a few minutes can grow into a costly, damaging wildfire. Stay with your campfire from start to finish until it is dead out, as required by law. That ensures any escaped sparks or embers can be extinguished quickly. 

·         Consider alternatives to a campfire this summer

Portable camp stoves are a safer option to campfires at any time of year. Areas that prohibit campfires outside maintained campgrounds with established fire pits often allow camp stoves.

·         Never use gasoline or other accelerants

Don’t use flammable or combustible liquids, such as gasoline, propane or lighter fluid, to start or increase your campfire. 

·         Burn ONLY local wood

Hauling your firewood to a remote campground can potentially transport invasive species. Instead, buy it where you’ll burn it or gather wood on site where permitted. State regulations prohibit the open burning of any other material that creates dense, toxic smoke or noxious odors. Burning paper and cardboard can also easily fly up to start new fires.

Escaped campfires can be costly. State and federal law require the proper clearing, building, attending and extinguishing of open fires at any time of year. While citations and fines may apply, the biggest potential cost for an escaped campfire is firefighting costs. These can range from a few hundred to tens of thousands of dollars or more.

During Wildfire Awareness Month visit Smokey Bear’s website athttps://www.smokeybear.com/en and www.keeporegongreen.org for other wildfire prevention tips.

Grays Harbor College Receives Suicide Prevention Grant

Grays Harbor College is partnering with Beyond Survival and Grays Harbor Public Health and Social Services Department to achieve the goals outlined in a recently awarded Suicide Prevention Grant from the Washington Student Achievement Council (WSAC). This program, funded by the 2018 Washington Legislature, authorized $420,000 to the Suicide Prevention in Higher Education Grant Program through Senate Bill 6514.

Grays Harbor College is one of eight Washington state colleges and universities that received the grant.  The other colleges that received this grant funding included: Central Washington University, Divers Institute of Technology, Everett Community College, Heritage University, Spokane Community College, and Washington State University.

The WSAC Suicide Prevention grant is funding on-campus programming, speakers, and events around suicide awareness and prevention as well as suicide prevention training for faculty and staff.  Beyond Survival has been an active partner in programing, speakers, and events, providing several speakers and trainings on campus related to suicide prevention, sexual assault prevention and awareness, and mental health.

“Grays Harbor College is committed to the health and well-being of our students and community.  Through partnerships with local agencies, we are excited to be able to bring our campus more resources to provide greater holistic support for our students and training for our faculty and staff”, said Dr. Jim Minkler, President of Grays Harbor College.

Through the partnerships developed in the grant, Grays Harbor College is embarking on the development of the HOPE Squad program on its campus in collaboration with Grays Harbor Public Health and Social Services Department and local area high schools and middle schools. Hoquiam School District has already been providing students with a HOPE Squad for the past two years, and Aberdeen School District will implement HOPE Squad in their High School this Fall in addition to Grays Harbor College. “The continuation of the HOPE Squad pipeline from K-12 to higher education will benefit the Grays Harbor community tremendously when it comes to greater awareness around suicide prevention”, said Dr. Jennifer Alt, Vice President for Student Services at Grays Harbor College. 

The HOPE Squad is a school based peer-to-peer suicide prevention program. Students are trained to watch for other students who are demonstrating warning signs, provide friendship, and seek help from adults or professionals. HOPE Squad members are not taught to act as counselors, but are educated on recognizing suicide warning signs and how to connect their peers properly and respectfully with trusted adults or professionals. HOPE Squads seek to reduce self-destructive behaviors and suicide by training, building, and creating change in schools and communities. Grays Harbor College will be hosting its first advisor training and student information sessions about the HOPE Squad on May 22, 2019. For more information, please contact Jennifer Alt at 360-538-4066.

Oklahoma town urges evacuation due to rising river

WEBBERS FALLS, Okla. (AP) — A small town in Oklahoma is urging residents to evacuate as the Arkansas River heads toward near-historic levels.

Forecasters say major flooding is expected in Webbers Falls, a town of about 600 people about 140 miles (225 kilometers) east of Oklahoma City.

According to the National Weather Service, the Arkansas River was at 34.5 feet (10.5 meters), or 6.5 feet (2 meters) above flood stage, as of Wednesday morning. The river was expected to rise to 40 feet (12 meters) by Thursday morning. The National Weather Service says the flooding poses an “extremely dangerous and life-threatening situation.”

Forecasters say parts of Oklahoma, Missouri and Kansas could see severe weather Wednesday, the latest in a multi-day stretch of storms that have spawned dozens of tornadoes and caused two deaths in Missouri.

Brought to you by www.srnnews.com

Teen charged in school threat to Santa with classmate’s name

WESLEY CHAPEL, Fla. (AP) — Authorities say a Florida teen has been charged with threatening a school shooting in a postcard to Santa and signing a classmate’s name last fall.

The Tampa Bay Times reports that the 15-year-old boy was arrested Monday and charged with making written threats to kill or do bodily harm.

The Pasco County Sheriff’s Office says the holiday postcard was dropped off in November at a Wesley Chapel Macy’s. The note threatened at shooting at nearby Wiregrass Ranch High School. Detectives interviewed a female student whose name was signed to the postcard but ruled her out as a suspect.

Authorities say fingerprints on the postcard led to the teen boy, who had a previous misdemeanor arrest.

___

Information from: Tampa Bay Times (St. Petersburg, Fla.), http://www.tampabay.com.

Brought to you by www.srnnews.com

10 Things to Know for Today

Your daily look at late breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:

1. IMPEACHMENT CALLS GROW IN HOUSE

More Democrats are calling for action against Trump after his latest defiance of Congress by blocking his former White House lawyer from testifying.

2. NORTH KOREA HURLS INSULTS AT BIDEN

Pyongyang labels the presidential candidate a “fool of low IQ” and an “imbecile bereft of elementary quality as a human being” after he recently called Kim Jong Un a tyrant.

3. HOW FAKE NEWS IS EVOLVING

As the EU gears up for a crucial election, it is mostly homegrown groups that are using social media to push false information and extremist messages, experts say.

4. NONPROFITS TURN TO CRYPTOCURRENCY TO HELP NEEDY VENEZUELANS

A handful of charities are using digital currencies to send relief directly to those in need in Venezuela, circumventing banks and companies that handle remittances.

5. INFRASTRUCTURE TALKS BACK ON

Trump and Democratic congressional leaders will meet again to formulate a $2 trillion package to invest in roads, bridges and broadband.

6. VIOLENCE ERUPTS IN INDONESIAN CAPITAL

Six people have died in election rioting in Jakarta as supporters of the losing presidential candidate burn vehicles and battle police while the government restricts social media.

7. PLEA DEAL FOR SERIAL ONLINE HARASSER FITS LENIENT PATTERN

A Denver man who posted a Facebook message threatening to kill women in retaliation for years of romantic rejection has been catching breaks from courts in Colorado and Utah, AP finds.

8. E-AUTO BOOM COULD COST INDUSTRY JOBS

Volkswagen is creating its first all-electric plant in Germany, a move illustrating how the global shift to battery-only cars could disrupt a long-established industry and its jobs, AP reports.

9. THEME PARK TO STAR ‘HUNGER GAMES,’ ‘TWILIGHT’

Lionsgate is opening what it calls the world’s first vertical theme park in China featuring some of the studio’s top films, AP learns.

10. A REMATCH 49 YEARS IN THE MAKING

The Bruins and Blues will meet in the Stanley Cup Final, a rematch of the 1970 series that ended with Bobby Orr’s famous goal and leaping celebration.

Brought to you by www.srnnews.com

U.S. military families more negative about housing than landlords claim, survey shows

By M.B. Pell and Joshua Schneyer

NEW YORK (Reuters) – U.S. military families are expressing far deeper dissatisfaction with their housing conditions than their private landlords claim, according to a granular survey of tenants at more than 100 bases across the country that was recently presented to Congress.

The survey, conducted by the nonprofit Military Family Advisory Network, was initially publicized in February. Three months later, the group has released a more detailed analysis of the results, providing a base-by-base look at the survey findings and a window into the problems most frequently cited.

For more than a year, Reuters has exposed slum-like conditions dogging the Department of Defense housing privatization program, describing how private landlords reap billions in payments even as tenants clamor for repairs. The armed forces began privatizing base housing for military families two decades ago.

The Department of Defense said it couldn’t discuss the survey, but is “confident that privatizing housing was the right thing to do,” a spokeswoman said. “However, we also recognize there has been a lapse in overseeing implementation of DoD’s housing privatization program.”

The survey results, built from responses by 15,000 families living in 46 states and 158 bases, echo the Reuters reports of widespread concern about housing conditions among military tenants. In all, 55% of families who responded gave a negative view of their base housing. Just 16% gave positive marks, with the rest neutral.

The survey results stand in stark contrast to those reported by private military housing operators, who annually poll a subset of their residents and release results that often list satisfaction rates above 90%. Those annual survey results can help companies earn Defense Department bonuses that, cumulatively, total in the millions of dollars a year.

In all, more than 100 bases had an overall negative satisfaction score, with 6,629 reports of housing-related health problems, 3,342 of mold, 1,564 of pest infestations and 46 of carbon monoxide leaks.

The study turned up deep pockets of discontent:

– At Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Washington State, landlord Lincoln Military Housing reported 70% to 90% of residents were satisfied with housing in 2016. The nonprofit’s survey, by contrast, found 10% of respondents had a positive view, and 58% a negative one. Tenants cited 204 reports of poor maintenance, 92 of excessive filth at move-in, and 78 of structural concerns. Lincoln Military Housing did not respond to an interview request.

– At Kirtland Air Force Base in New Mexico, a survey commissioned by Hunt Military Housing said 90% to 94% of residents were satisfied with housing in 2016. The new survey found just 15% held a positive view, and 59% a negative one. Kirtland families cited 43 reports of mold, 24 of vermin infestations and 3 carbon monoxide leaks. A Hunt spokesperson said a survey conducted earlier this year by base command found 88% of residents were satisfied with their housing at Kirtland. Still, the company said it is working with the Air Force to address concerns and has “further improved our processes and procedures,” including adding a “Hunt Promise Helpline” allowing residents direct contact with corporate management.

– At Fort Hood in Texas, 71% to 79% of residents liked their housing in 2016, according to a survey commissioned by the installation’s Australian-based landlord LendLease Group and the Army. The new survey found only 15% of base families had a positive view, and 54% a negative one. Driving these results: 121 reports of poor maintenance, 82 of mold and 67 of dilapidated housing. In a statement to Reuters, LendLease said it has confidence in the results of the surveys it obtained from a third-party research firm. The company said it couldn’t comment on the new report without a better understanding of its methodology.

The three companies are among more than a dozen private real estate developers and property managers operating military housing on bases across the country under a flagship government privatization program that has been expanding since the early 2000s.

MILITARY HOUSING ACTION PLAN

The Air Force acknowledged airmen don’t believe privatized housing is meeting their needs, spokesman Mark Kinkade said in a statement to Reuters. “We heard that message loud and clear,” he said.

Following Senate hearings in February, leadership at Air Force bases visited 11,534 homes and found 5,102 health and safety concerns, he said. The Air Force and private landlords have addressed 3,855 and are tracking the remaining 1,247.

Army and Navy officials say they have yet to see the expanded results of the Military Family Advisory Network’s survey. The Navy said the new figures may not reflect recent efforts to improve housing.

Last week, Army Secretary Mark Esper, Navy Secretary Richard Spencer and Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson met with senior executives from nine private companies that manage military housing to discuss a proposed tenant bill of rights, modifications to incentive fees paid to the companies and other means of improving living conditions.

“We are taking immediate steps to resolve both individual and systemic issues to provide the quality housing and proactive management we envision,” Wilson said in a statement.

A Reuters reporting team visited 16 federal bases last year and spoke with hundreds of families, finding swaths of housing plagued by hazards that can pose serious health risks to tenants. Residents on military bases often lacked basic rights renters can rely on in civilian communities, such as the ability to withhold rent from derelict landlords.

Prompted by the Reuters reports, the military branches pledged to hire hundreds of new housing staff and have moved to renegotiate the 50-year contracts held by the private real estate firms.

Congress has held multiple hearings to question private landlords and military brass, and has examined the survey results as part of its inquiries.

Military Family Advisory Network is an Alexandria, Virginia, non-profit whose stated mission is to represent the interests of U.S. military families. Its study is subjective, based on opinions provided by participants, rather than on independent inspections. Its survey, conducted online, collected responses from a portion of the approximately 200,000 families living in U.S. military privatized housing. It gathered the responses over a one-week period ending February 6. Since then, the military has put some significant reforms in place.

Earlier this month, the group provided the more detailed results to the Senate Armed Services Committee, where members have sponsored legislation to create a tenant bill of rights, penalize landlords who do not quickly fix hazards and mandate regular and unannounced spot inspections of base homes.

Some who took part in the survey say they have little power in dealing with landlords. “We can’t afford to move off base,” said Megan Konzen, a tenant of Laughlin Air Force Base in Texas, where the vast majority of respondents gave a negative rating. “We are stuck.”

(Editing by Ronnie Greene)

Brought to you by www.srnnews.com

U.S. south ‘still under the gun’ after deadly storms

By Rich McKay

(Reuters) – A storm system that blasted the U.S. South was weakening on Tuesday but another was on its way after thunderstorms and tornadoes left a swath of destruction, killed at least two people and tore up a NASCAR grandstand.

More than 30 tornadoes struck on Monday and Tuesday from Texas, Oklahoma and across the southern plains into Missouri, said meteorologists with the National Weather Service.

While this weakening storm system is expected to roll into the Great Lakes region early Wednesday, another system is brewing Wednesday night into Thursday, said Brian Hurley, a forecaster with the NWS Weather Prediction Center.

“The Southern Plains can’t catch a break,” Hurley said. “More storms will develop overnight into Thursday morning.”

Rainfalls are predicted to be about 2 inches across eastern Kansas, Oklahoma, and into western Missouri, with localized spots getting up to 5 inches, he said.

“That whole area is still under the gun,” Hurley said.

In Wheatland, Missouri, at the Lucas Oil Speedway, a reported tornado injured 7 people, flipped over cars, toppled campers and damaged the grandstands, with local media images showing piles of twisted metal and upside down vehicles.

The Memorial Day weekend “Lucas Oil Show-Me 100” races at the speedway, about 120 miles southeast of Kansas City, were canceled indefinitely. A crowd topping 3,000 fans of the National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) had been expected, track officials said on Tuesday.

Dozens of people were rescued from rising floodwaters and felled trees that smashed homes and blocked roadways in Oklahoma on Tuesday.

Crews using boats pulled at least 50 people from rising water as heavy downpours inundated roads and homes, Oklahoma Emergency Management Agency spokeswoman Keli Cain said.

Two deaths from a traffic accident on a rain slicked Missouri highway were reported by police late Monday.

Missouri Gov. Mike Parson declared a state of emergency on Tuesday for the state, out of concern for floods from cresting rivers and streams, with forecasts of more rain on the way.

Forecasters said the Missouri River is expected to crest on Thursday at more than 32 feet at the state capital of Jefferson City. Local media including NBC News said that is two feet higher than the city’s levees.

(Reporting by Rich McKay in Atlanta; additional reporting by Brendan O’Brien in Milwaukee and Dan Whitcomb in Los Angeles; Editing by Peter Graff)

Brought to you by www.srnnews.com

U.S. south ‘still under the gun’ after deadly storms

By Rich McKay

(Reuters) – A storm system that blasted the U.S. South was weakening on Tuesday but another was on its way after thunderstorms and tornadoes left a swath of destruction, killed at least two people and tore up a NASCAR grandstand.

More than 30 tornadoes struck on Monday and Tuesday from Texas, Oklahoma and across the southern plains into Missouri, said meteorologists with the National Weather Service.

While this weakening storm system is expected to roll into the Great Lakes region early Wednesday, another system is brewing Wednesday night into Thursday, said Brian Hurley, a forecaster with the NWS Weather Prediction Center.

“The Southern Plains can’t catch a break,” Hurley said. “More storms will develop overnight into Thursday morning.”

Rainfalls are predicted to be about 2 inches across eastern Kansas, Oklahoma, and into western Missouri, with localized spots getting up to 5 inches, he said.

“That whole area is still under the gun,” Hurley said.

In Wheatland, Missouri, at the Lucas Oil Speedway, a reported tornado injured 7 people, flipped over cars, toppled campers and damaged the grandstands, with local media images showing piles of twisted metal and upside down vehicles.

The Memorial Day weekend “Lucas Oil Show-Me 100” races at the speedway, about 120 miles southeast of Kansas City, were canceled indefinitely. A crowd topping 3,000 fans of the National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) had been expected, track officials said on Tuesday.

Dozens of people were rescued from rising floodwaters and felled trees that smashed homes and blocked roadways in Oklahoma on Tuesday.

Crews using boats pulled at least 50 people from rising water as heavy downpours inundated roads and homes, Oklahoma Emergency Management Agency spokeswoman Keli Cain said.

Two deaths from a traffic accident on a rain slicked Missouri highway were reported by police late Monday.

Missouri Gov. Mike Parson declared a state of emergency on Tuesday for the state, out of concern for floods from cresting rivers and streams, with forecasts of more rain on the way.

Forecasters said the Missouri River is expected to crest on Thursday at more than 32 feet at the state capital of Jefferson City. Local media including NBC News said that is two feet higher than the city’s levees.

(Reporting by Rich McKay in Atlanta; additional reporting by Brendan O’Brien in Milwaukee and Dan Whitcomb in Los Angeles; Editing by Peter Graff)

Brought to you by www.srnnews.com