Black History Month 2017: Blogs Related to Military

Happy Black History Month! This year the Rediscovering Black History blog at the National Archives would like to highlight select posts from the past. This public blog was created to inform researchers, scholars, students, and anyone interested in records related to African-American history at the National Archives and Presidential Libraries on the vast amount of textual, electronic, photographs, and special media available for use. For the past four years, NARA employees, student interns, and independent researchers have written informative and insightful blogs on the black experience through the use of our holdings. The highlighted blog posts for the month of February will center around popular themes. Today’s theme is military.

"Master Charles Michael Lee, A Patriot" August, 1941. Local ID: 111-SC-121857

“Master Charles Michael Lee, A Patriot” August, 1941. Local ID: 111-SC-121857

African Americans have contributed to every war fought by the United States from the Revolutionary War to today’s current conflicts. The records used on this topic are mostly military records from all branches, which includes textual, motion pictures, and photographs to highlight the actions of African Americans primarily during the Civil War and World War II. Selected blogs focus on the heroic actions of black soldiers, discrimination in the military, and little unknown stories about the involvement of African Americans enlisted in the US military.

 

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Black History Month 2017: Blogs Related to Black Power

Happy Black History Month! This year the Rediscovering Black History blog at the National Archives would like to highlight select posts from the past. This public blog was created to inform researchers, scholars, students, and anyone interested in records related to African-American history at the National Archives and Presidential Libraries on the vast amount of textual, electronic, photographs, and special media available for use. For the past four years, NARA employees, student interns, and independent researchers have written informative and insightful blogs on the black experience through the use of our holdings. The highlighted blog posts for the month of February will center around popular themes. Today’s theme is Black Power.

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In 2016, we celebrated the 50th anniversary of the Black Power movement in America. The blogs posted about Black Power were some of our most popular. They related to such topics as the Black Panthers, individuals who made strides within Black Power, and attempts towards black economic independence. The black power blogs were also written in part to promote NARA Say it Loud! Employee Affinity Group’s panel presentation “Revolutionary Movements Then and Now: Black Power and Black Lives Matter,” which was held in October 2016 at the National Archives in Washington, D. C.

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Black History Month 2017: Blogs Related to the Post-Reconstruction Era

Happy Black History Month! This year the Rediscovering Black History blog at the National Archives would like to highlight select posts from the past. This public blog was created to inform researchers, scholars, students, and anyone interested in records related to African-American history at the National Archives and Presidential Libraries on the vast amount of textual, electronic, photographs, and special media available for use. For the past four years, NARA employees, student interns, and independent researchers have written informative and insightful blogs on the black experience through the use of our holdings. The highlighted blog posts for the month of February will center around popular themes. Today’s theme is the Post-Reconstruction Era.

Telegram from John Beggett, Secretary of the Ministerial Alliance to President Warren G. Harding, 01/08/1923

Telegram from John Beggett, Secretary of the Ministerial Alliance to President Warren G. Harding, 01/08/1923

The Post-Reconstruction Era refers to the period between the Compromise of 1877 and the early twentieth century, when African Americans faced widespread disenfranchisement, legal discrimination, anti-black violence, and lynching. Historian Rayford Logan coined this era as the Nadir, which he described as the lowest point of racial relations in US history. Selected blogs in this topic relate to lynching, protest, and the image of African Americans.

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Black History Month 2017: Blogs Related to the Civil Rights Movement

Happy Black History Month! This year the Rediscovering Black History blog at the National Archives would like to highlight select posts from the past. This public blog was created to inform researchers, scholars, students, and anyone interested in records related to African-American history at the National Archives and Presidential Libraries on the vast amount of textual, electronic, photographs, and special media available for use. For the past four years, NARA employees, student interns, and independent researchers have written informative and insightful blogs on the black experience through the use of our holdings. The highlighted blog posts for the month of February will center around popular themes. Today’s theme is the Civil Rights Movement.

Young women at the march, 08/28/1963 (National Archives Identifier 542022)

Young women at the march, 08/28/1963 (National Archives Identifier 542022)

Blogs about the Civil Rights Movement highlight the struggles, challenges, and successes of African Americans in achieving fair treatment and equal rights. The records used on this topic were mostly created by investigative agencies such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the Department of Justice (DOJ) to monitor violations of the Civil Rights Act. The selected blogs relate to voting rights, protest, marches, and the murder of people fighting for justice.

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Black History Month 2017: Blogs Related to the Panama Canal

Happy Black History Month! This year the Rediscovering Black History blog at the National Archives would like to highlight select posts from the past. This public blog was created to inform researchers, scholars, students, and anyone interested in records related to African-American history at the National Archives and Presidential Libraries on the vast amount of textual, electronic, photographs, and special media available for use. For the past four years, NARA employees, student interns, and independent researchers have written informative and insightful blogs on the black experience through the use of our holdings. The highlighted blog posts for the month of February will center around popular themes. Today’s theme is the Panama Canal.

West Indian Wedding Party (NAID 535444)

RG 185 West Indian Wedding Party (NAID 535444)

Blogs about the Panama Canal have been some of our most popular. These records are primarily used for genealogy and labor history, since they contain a great deal of personal information on West Indian workers. The type of information found includes birth, death, and marriage records, pay scale, and employment type. The records on the Panama Canal have also received additional attention due the 100th anniversary of the completion of the canal in 1914.

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Black History Month 2017: Blogs Related to Black Education

Happy Black History Month! This year the Rediscovering Black History blog at the National Archives would like to highlight select posts from the past. This public blog was created to inform researchers, scholars, students, and anyone interested in records related to African-American history at the National Archives and Presidential Libraries on the vast amount of textual, electronic, photographs, and special media available for use. For the past four years, NARA employees, student interns, and independent researchers have written informative and insightful blogs on the black experience through the use of our holdings. The highlighted blog posts for the month of February will center around popular themes. Today’s theme is black education.

Howard University, Graduating Student (NAID 26174879)

Howard University, Graduating Student (NAID 26174879)

The blogs relating to black education in the United States are of special interest to researchers and scholars across the country, as they can relate to concerns surrounding education today. The records in the National Archives on this topic contain information on federal funding, studies on vocational training, legislation regarding equal access, and other issues of the government’s involvement with public education. Our blogs on black education covered several issues, including the desegregation of public schools, innovators in black education, and life on black college campuses.

 

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Thanks, Obama

Today’s post was written by Netisha Currie, Archives Specialist at the National Archives at College Park.

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Official Portrait of President Barack Obama (NAID 7851969)

Barack Hussein Obama was elected the 44th President of the United States on November 4, 2008. By winning nearly 53% of the popular vote in an election that brought the highest voter turnout until the most recent election of 2016, Americans made history as we decided to chose an African American man to assume the highest office in the land. Continue reading

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75th Anniversary of the Attack on Pearl Harbor: Dorie Miller, War Hero

Today’s blog was written by Dr. Tina L. Ligon, Supervisory Archivist at the National Archives at College Park, Maryland

At 7:48 am on December 7, 1941, Japanese fighter planes and bombers began their surprise attack on the US Naval base at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. In two waves of attack, the Japanese sunk 4 battleships, as well as damaged 4 more battleships, 3 cruisers, 3 destroyers, an anti-aircraft training ship, and 1 minelayer, along with destroying 188 aircraft. The early morning attack also killed 2,403 Americans and injured another 1,178. The attack on Pearl Harbor by the Japanese, caused the United States to enter World War II.

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Gwen Ifill, “A Journalist’s Journalist”

Today’s Tribute was written by Dr. Tina L. Ligon, Supervisory Archivist at the National Archives at College Park

“Journalists are accused of being lapdogs when they don’t ask the hard questions, but then accused of being rude when they do. Good thing we have tough hides.” ~ Gwen Ifill

On November 14, 2016, Gwen Ifill passed at the age of 61 in Washington, D. C. She was an award winning journalist and television newscaster, who moderated and reported on a range of topics related politics and social injustices. Several town hall sessions that she recently moderated included “America after Ferguson” in 2014, “America after Charleston” in 2015, and “Voters Choices” with President Barack Obama in 2016. She received numerous awards, which included the Gracie Allen Tribute Award in 2004, the Peabody Award in 2008, and the First Amendment Award in 2011. Also in 2011, Ifill was inducted as an honorary member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, and in 2012, she was inducted into the National Association of Black Journalists Hall of Fame.

Gwen Ifill at "A Conversation with Gwen Ifill" (1/22/09) https://www.jfklibrary.org/Asset-Viewer/Q0_e8Zd7uk2dplsvUQBKDg.aspx

Gwen Ifill at “A Conversation with Gwen Ifill” (1/22/09) https://www.jfklibrary.org/Asset-Viewer/Q0_e8Zd7uk2dplsvUQBKDg.aspx

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Commander-in-Chief: U.S. Presidents and their Executive Power

Today’s post was written by Alexis Hill, Assistant Registrar in the Exhibits Division at the National Archives in College Park, Maryland

How has a Commander-in-Chief used his executive power to help shape a diverse nation?  With the stroke of a pen, he has used this power to command, appoint, veto, remove, and pardon. This year, the National Archives Exhibits Division’s Outgoing Loan program teamed up with the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia, and lent several original documents for a special exhibition in conjunction with the upcoming 2016 Presidential Election, entitled Powers of the President. The exhibition explores the president’s executive power under the Constitution and how many of them have exercised it.  Included in the original documents relating to presidential power in Black history are President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s message nominating Earl Warren to be Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court and President Ronald Reagan’s veto of S. 557, Civil Rights Restoration Act of 1987.

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