The Audacity to Podcast https://theaudacitytopodcast.com A how-to podcast about podcasting and using Audacity Tue, 20 Jun 2017 12:00:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8 http://feeds.noodle.mx/theaudacitytopodcast-mp3 Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com (Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher) © 2010–2017 D.Joseph Design LLC Giving you the guts and teaching you the tools to launch or improve your own podcast The Audacity to Podcast https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/6/powerpress/tap-cover-art-3-144x144-816.png https://theaudacitytopodcast.com TV-G Cincinnati, OH Weekly Apple’s iOS 11, Podcast Analytics, and Podcasting Spec Update – TAP310 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/grFMkiHohAQ/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/apples-ios-11-podcast-analytics-and-podcasting-spec-update-tap310/#respond Tue, 20 Jun 2017 12:00:45 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=13323

At the 2017 Worldwide Developer Conference (WWDC), Apple announced several big changes that will help podcasters and podcast-consumers. Here's what you need to know.

WebRTC coming to Safari on macOS and iOS

WebRTC stands for “Web Real-Time Communication.” It's the technology that enables many browser-based streaming tools, such as Zencastr, Ringr, Facebook Live, Cast, and even the late Blab.

For a long time, WebRTC has work in Chrome, Firefox, and Opera, on Windows, macOS, Linux, and even Android. But noticeably absent was Safari for macOS and especially for iOS.

Finally making Safari support WebRTC means many of these streaming tools may now be usable on iOS devices! This is great news if you rely on tools like Zencastr, Ringr, or Cast to record multiender conversations with guests or cohosts.

This means, in theory, your guest or cohosts will no longer have to install an app on their mobile device in order to participate in your podcast!

It could even make voice-feedback systems, such as SpeakPipe, work entirely in the browser without the need for apps, plugins, or Adobe Flash!

Redesigned Apple Podcasts app

Apple's Podcasts app on iOS is still the most popular podcast-consumption method by far. With the redesign iOS 11, it will be easier for subscribers to listen to or resume playback for any of the shows on their device.

The interface is simpler, the display of data is smarter, the experience is smoother, and it will be a whole lot better for seasonal or serialized content!

Updated podcasting spec and iTunes RSS tags

Apple has barely updated the iTunes podcasting spec since they created it in 2005. But with the launch of iOS 11, Apple will support several new and updated RSS tags.

New RSS tags

<itunes:type>

This is the only show-level tag (also called “channel-level”) Apple added. It sets the type of podcast you have, either episodic or serial. Apple may add more types in the future.

“Episodic” is the default type and it's the same as what we've been using for all shows until now. This is when standalone episodes can be consumed in any order. “Episodic” can have seasons. With or without seasons, the newest episode will be displayed and downloaded first, with the other episodes listed newest to oldest.

“Serial” is the new type and it's best when your episodes should be displayed and consumed oldest to newest. This is ideal for any podcast that's best consumed from the beginning of the season or complete series. For example, audio dramas (e.g., The Fall of the House of Sunshine), storytelling (e.g., Serial), or sequential parts (e.g., “How to Podcast” with each episode being a step in the process). This also supports seasons. With or without seasons, the first episode will be downloaded and consumed first.

The rest of these new and updated tags are episode-level (also called item-level).

<itunes:title>

This tag is for the title of your episode and only the title. There shouldn't be any episode number, season number, show title, or show abbreviation.

If you use <itunes:title>, it will take precedence over the standard <title> tag for each episode, and that can still contain all the other stuff, if you want.

The purpose of this is to get a clean title for the episode to display differently depending on context and other factors.

For example, if the show type is “serial” and you use seasons, “Season #, Episode #” will display above the episode title, and only the episode number will display in the beginning of the title. But if you don't use seasons, only “Episode #” will display above the episode title, and there won't be a number displayed in the title.

I like this because it makes the display of titles a whole lot cleaner. And for those rare shows that actually need season and episode number information displayed prominently, Apple Podcasts will handle those nicely.

So if this should contain only the episode title, what about those season and episode numbers? That's where the next two tags come in.

<itunes:season>

This tag lets you set the season number to anything greater than zero. Apple Podcasts will group the episodes into seasons and play/download them newest to oldest for episodic show types, or oldest to newest for serial show types.

Apple Podcasts will only display the season number when you have more than one season in your feed. And it displays the season with those episode groups as well as above the title of the currently playing episode.

No matter when you publish an episode in your RSS feed, it will be included with the appropriate season when you use the same season number.

<itunes:episode>

This tag indicates the episode number—anything greater than zero. It's useful for seasonal, serial, and even non-seasonal or non-serial shows.

The episode number will display with and above the episode title when the show type is serial. Otherwise, it will display only above the title when the show type is episodic.

You may initially be discouraged that this tag supports only numbers above zero. But Apple has accounted for that with another new tag!

<itunes:episodeType>

This tag can be set to full, trailer, or bonus.

“Full” is the default episode type and the same as what we've published for years. This would be a regular, possibly numbered episode.

“Trailer” is a short episode that could promote either a season or the whole show. It will be displayed more prominently than the rest of the episodes. This could take the place of “episode 0,” if you wanted to do that kind of thing.

“Bonus” is any kind of extra content for a show, such as behind the scenes, Q&A, extras, or anything like that.

Although Apple didn't clarify, I think “trailer” and “bonus” types will display in relation to their set season and maybe even set episode number. For example, publish a “bonus” episode that uses the same number as another episode, and the episodes may play like this:

  • Episode 1
  • Episode 2
  • Episode 3
  • Bonus for episode 3
  • Episode 4
  • Episode 5

Thus, I think “trailer” episodes will display before their relevant content: before an entire season, or within a season but before the defined episode. And I think “bonus” episodes will display after their relevant content: after an entire season or within a season but after the defined episode.

Updated tags

Apple also changed a couple tags from previous recommendations.

<itunes:summary>

We've previously been able to use this tag to force different show notes to display in Apple Podcasts. It could support basic HTML formatting (paragraphs, bold, italic, lists, and links), but was limited to 4,000 characters.

Now, Apple says this should be a short description for the episode. Try to make it only one or two sentences and probably 255 or fewer characters.

This will display with the episode as a short description of the episode's contents. It will no longer support HTML. If your summaries already contain HTML, then it will be stripped and ignored.

<content:encoded>

This is a standard RSS tag to contain the entire post. Previously, Apple Podcasts would truncate this text, and that often meant I couldn't display my full show notes. But in the new update, it seems Apple will display this full content below the episode description and player, and it will support basic HTML formatting (paragraphs, bold, italic, lists, and links). There doesn't seem to be a character limit.

I think this brings Apple Podcasts in line with how most other podcast apps display the full show notes. (Overcast will even display images!)

Publishing your full notes in this tag will significantly increase the size of your RSS feed, which could be further reason to abandon FeedBurner and ensure you have proper caching on your site or use a reliable third-party feed tool, like Libsyn.

Clarifications

<guid>

The GUID (globally unique identifier) has been part of the RSS standard for practically forever. I've talked frequently about the importance of not changing this tag, especially when you change domains, migrate your feed to a new host or tool, or switch from HTTP to HTTPS. The GUID for each item is how any RSS client (including podcast apps) will know whether that item has already be loaded.

So you could change everything about an episode in your RSS feed, but if the GUID is the same, the episode will not redownload. The inverse is also true. You could change nothing about an episode your RSS feed, but change the GUID—even by only a single character—and that episode will be forced to redownload.

That's why, for a long time now, I've stressed the importance of not changing the GUID except when it's absolutely necessary to force your audience to redownload an episode (such as when it was so messed up it was unlistenable or unwatchable). But if you change domains, media hosts, feed-creation tools, or anything else about your podcast, the GUID absolutely must remain the same, or else you could force your audience to redownload all your episodes and thus corrupt your stats.

So there's nothing new about Apple's advice to “Assign the GUID to an episode only once and never change it.” And their reason is, “Assigning new GUIDs to existing episodes can cause issues with your podcast’s listing.” Or in other words, cause your episodes to display multiple times. But even more interestingly, they pointed out that it “can cause issues with your podcast's … chart placement in Apple Podcasts.” This makes sense because it means splitting the popularity of a single episode across multiple instances (separate GUIDs), or it means there could be an episode that will seem like it was never downloaded.

Think of it this way. Apple Podcasts doesn't see unique episodes, it sees GUIDs. So it will track the popularity of a single GUID for many years. But if you change the GUID of that same episode, you're starting over with tracking and popularity. It's like throwing the episode's reputation away and starting over from nothing.

While it may be tempting to do some unethical things with your GUIDs in order to artificially inflate your numbers, this will only hurt your podcast in many ways. The only time you should change the GUID is when it's absolutely necessary for your audience to be forced to redownload that episode, and they would be grateful for it (such as to fix a corrupted episode).

Podcast cover art size

During Apple's presentation, they mentioned the 3,000 × 3,000 JPEG or PNG spec for podcast cover art, but they also said, “Under 1 MB.”

Currently, podcast cover art larger than 512 KB in the <itunes:image> tag has caused feed submission and refreshing issues. My theory is that the feeds are processed linearly, and if there's a timeout or error anywhere, it prevents any of the following code from being loaded. Because the cover art is loaded near the top of the feed, a bad cover art file can cause issues with the rest of the feed.

But Apple specifically said, “under 1 MB.” That may not be supported right now, but it makes me think it will be supported with the public release of iOS 11 in late 2017.

I really hope this is true because it can be very difficult to compress some 3,000 × 3,000 images below 512 KB and maintain acceptable image quality (some images compress more easily than others).

Consumption analytics from Apple Podcasts

The biggest podcasting news from WWDC, and what you've probably already heard about, is Apple's new Podcast Analytics coming to Podcasts Connect.

When Apple first launched Podcasts Connect in early 2016, I theorized it could be the framework for future stats and other tools. Invited partners have already been able to see download, stream, browse, and even basic demographic stats from iTunes and Apple Podcasts. But the new Podcast Analytics looks like it will be available to all podcasters through their own Podcasts Connect account.

This isn't simply server-side download data we've had for many years (and is mature enough to be trustworthy). But this is specific playback data, limited to Apple Podcasts (and probably iTunes).

Instead of seeing only that an episode was downloaded and how, you'll be able to see how much of the episode was played after the download (or during a “stream”).

Then, this can show you how many people skip ads or segments, when they abandon the episode, and how many consume the entire thing.

You can learn a whole lot from this data and use it to improve your podcasts. I'll talk more about that when we real data from these analytics.

You'll also be able to see how many of your audience are subscribed or not subscribed.

Additionally, Apple will show you the consumption of episodes based on each episodes age, nicely parallel with each other. With this, you would see that one episode reached 500 plays by day 10, while another reached 500 plays by day 6. And these are actual plays since release, not merely downloads.

It also appears you'll be able to filter data by location (probably countries), platforms (probably iPhone, iPad, macOS, Windows, and such), and even “listeners” (probably subscribers versus nonsubscribers, or maybe even demographic data).

There's probably even more we'll be able to see with these stats.

Even though these analytics will be limited to Apple's own Podcasts apps, that represents 60–70% of all podcast consumption (according to both Blubrry and Libsyn), so it's a large enough majority—and the largest single platform by far—that it's reasonable to extrapolate this data to the rest of your audience. However, it's possible (and maybe even likely) consumers outside the Apple platforms are more faithful to podcast consumption than the more general public using and browsing on the Apple platforms.

This is really exciting because it means podcast analytics will now be more accurate than all other media, except for streaming. For example, you can see whether a banner ad displayed when someone loaded a page, but you can't know if the person even saw it. Or you can know how many magazines are sold, but you can't know how many people read them, let alone saw the ads. And you can only assume how many people are watching or listening to broadcast media, but you can't know whether they skipped the commercials.

This is fantastic for content creators as well as advertisers. I believe it will show that dynamically inserted ads are usually skipped; but personable, host-performed ads are usually consumed. I think it will also show people abandon episodes when podcasters overwhelm their audience with calls to action.

And, I suspect, it may even show greater loyalty to smaller shows.

How and when can you use all this new stuff?

Unfortunately, this will require some patience. Developers already have access to iOS 11 and can test the new Podcasts app, but these new features will be practically useless until iOS 11 is released to the public in Fall, 2017, and then as iOS users upgrade.

The top podcasting tools (such as Blubrry, PowerPress, and Libsyn) are already being tested and updated to support these features. So you won't get access right away, but you will probably get access before iOS 11 is released. In the meantime, implementing the new RSS tags won't do anything for you. So please be patient.

The new Podcast Analytics will probably be available at the same time as iOS 11, or shortly after. Apple did say “this year” (2017).

But this does introduce a new problem: how to access your show in Podcasts connect. If someone else submitted your show to Apple, or you lost access to your Apple ID, you may not be able to see these cool new analytics for your show. However, Apple already has a process in place for transferring ownership of apps in the App Store, so I think podcast transfers aren't very far away.

As tempting as it may be to remove your podcast from Apple Podcasts and resubmit under an Apple ID you control, I strongly advise against that, as you would lose all your ratings, reviews, and ranking for your show. So you'll have to simply wait.

We also have yet to see how these changes affect podcast SEO, but I'll share any such updates in Podcasters' Society and with students of my SEO for Podcasters course.

Watch Apple's presentation about these podcasting updates

Official WWDC page.

Thank you for the podcast reviews!

    Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

    Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

    Announcements

    Need personalized podcasting help?

    I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

    Ask your questions or share your feedback

    Connect with me

    Disclosure

    This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

    ]]>
    https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/apples-ios-11-podcast-analytics-and-podcasting-spec-update-tap310/feed/ 0 At the 2017 Worldwide Developer Conference, Apple announced several big changes that will help podcasters and podcast-consumers. Here's what you need to know.
    - WebRTC coming to Safari on macOS and iOS
    - Redesigned Apple Podcasts app
    - Updated podcasting spec and iTunes RSS tags
    - Consumption analytics from Apple Podcasts
    - How and when can you use all this new stuff?

    Watch Apple's presentation about these podcasting updates:
    https://developer.apple.com/videos/play/wwdc2017/512/ or https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OjRfPNmkdzY

    Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

    Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

    Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/310

    FEEDBACK
    Call (903) 231-2221
    Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
    Send a voice message from https://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

    MAILING ADDRESS
    The Audacity to Podcast
    PO Box 739
    Burlington, KY 41005]]>
    Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 57:39 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/apples-ios-11-podcast-analytics-and-podcasting-spec-update-tap310/
    7 Promotion Strategies for Current-Events Podcasts – TAP309 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/rMcs3EZUPng/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/7-promotion-strategies-for-current-events-podcasts-tap309/#comments Tue, 13 Jun 2017 12:00:22 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=13296

    Podcast episodes about current events (including fan shows) may not have a long life, but you can still use them to promote and grow your podcast!

    A current-events podcast might cover news, politics, sports, TV shows, movies, books, music, and such. Essentially, anything that has a schedule and isn't as popular after it has passed.

    If your podcast can offer timeless content, then listen to my previous episode 308, “6 Ways to Make Your Content Live Longer.”

    1. Build reputation in related communities

    Many timely things have fan communities all over the Internet: Facebook Groups, Reddit Subreddits, Google+ Communities, and more. Your ideal audience hangs out in these communities, and they may be interested in your podcast.

    But don't start spamming a bunch of communities with your self-promotion. That will quickly get you banned.

    Instead, pick a couple or few places where you can participate in the community. Post questions, share answers, comment on things. Become an active, contributing member of that community. Then, when it's relevant and appropriate, you may find opportunities to share an episode of your podcast.

    Here are a few specific ideas you can use.

    1. When someone posts a question, respond with an answer in your comment, and link to your relevant podcast episode for more information.
    2. If you don't already have relevant content for that topic, incorporate that person's thought in an episode and then share it with them.
    3. If you spot your existing audience members in the community, ask them to become evangelists for you to share your podcast episodes.
    4. When you have something special that truly appeals to everyone in the community, ask the moderators for permission for you to share it. They may even be willing to share it for you!
    5. Find the extremely active community members and invite them onto your podcast, either as a guest for a whole episode or suggest they submit a segment. (You might need “How to Get Good Audio from Your Podcast Guests.”)
    6. If you're allowed an introductory post, be human and also use the opportunity to tell about your podcast.
    7. Ensure your personal profile and signature (if applicable) contain something about your podcast.
    8. Share relevant content no one else has shared yet and that's not your own.

    2. Participate live

    Anything that's live-broadcast, either simultaneously or time-shifted across time zones, could give you a great opportunity to connect with other fans.

    Find the official hashtag and participate on Twitter. To make it even easier to join the conversations, use a tool like tchat.io or TweetChat. These will let you see the hashtagged tweets in real time, and respond or post with the hashtag automatically added.

    If you already have an audience, you could host your own live chat during the event. That could be powered by your own hashtag or by a chat room embedded on a /live page on your own website. ChatWING, Chattango, Flyzoo, and Chatroll are some chat rooms great for this.

    This is especially easy when the event is simultaneously broadcast across multiple time zones, such as with sports. But if the live broadcast is shifted with each time zone, then you need to always be clear what time zone your live participation is in. Due to broadcasting schedules, Eastern and Central usually broadcast together and might have the most audience. More on time zones later.

    3. Live-stream after the event

    Doing anything live during the event you podcast about could be too distracting for you or your audience, so you may get more participation by hosting a live aftershow. I recommend that be no more than 15 minutes after the event, which is probably enough time for you and your audience to transition.

    This could be a great time to share initial reactions, incorporate instant feedback from your audience, or set up conversations that will happen later in the week.

    As with participating live, a live aftershow may reach the most people if you host it from Eastern or Central time zones for national broadcasts.

    It's especially good to live farther East for such events because you might be able to record and publish your aftershow before Western audiences even finish watching. Then, your episode is already available when the event is over in their time zone.

    4. Align publishing with the event schedule

    Publishing quickly and consistently are the most important things you can do with a current-events-based podcast. But if you want to incorporate audience feedback, then you'll need to allow enough time for your audience to watch and send their feedback.

    It is possible to wait too long, as well. If you publish your episode too close to the next event, then your audience may not have time to listen or watch before that next event is public. Even worse, you could sound dumb if your theories are proven wrong so quickly from your audience's perspective.

    For weekly events, I recommend publishing between 2–4 days after the event occurred, which gives your audience 2–4 days to consume your episode before the next event.

    If your source events are far less frequent, such as book or movie releases, then you could allow for more time to incorporate feedback. But you'll still get the best results by publishing as quickly as possible because that's when there's the most interest around that thing.

    5. Account for other time zones

    Whenever you do anything on a schedule with your audience, try to accommodate different time zones as reasonably as possible.

    For example, hosting a live stream at 7 pm Eastern may conflict with people still at work when it's 4 pm Pacific. Or a 10 pm Pacific event is 1 am Eastern.

    That doesn't mean you can't do anything at those times, only that you should be aware of how such choices may limit your audience's participation.

    Eastern and Central seem to be the best places to host a TV-show-fan podcast from because of how most TV shows broadcast to both time zones simultaneously (when you see two times listed, like “8/7 Central”) and because of the population density across those two time zones.

    Thus, if your live show coincides with a live TV broadcast, you may get more participation if it's based on the Eastern and Central schedule.

    And always include the time zone when you mention a time. You could use either your own local time zone, or consider using Eastern if you're in the USA. That's considered the official time in the USA because the capital is in Eastern Time.

    I'm not a fan of giving multiple time zones because people can look it up themselves. If you give four numbers, it's more likely they'll forget the correct one. But if you have an international audience, I do recommend you share the GMT (Greenwich Mean Time) offset for your time.

    Unfortunately, GMT doesn't follow Daylight Saving Time (DST), so if your time shifts with DST, you'll have to adjust the offset, too. For example, Eastern Standard Time (EST) is GMT-5, and Eastern Daylight Time (EDT) is GMT-4.

    Lastly, I recommend you also try to be technically accurate with your time zone abbreviations. “EST” applies to standard time, while “EDT” applies to Daylight Saving Time. But if you don't want to mess the DST and GMT, simply saying “Eastern Time” could be enough.

    6. Promote quickly

    Assuming you publish your relevant episode quickly, you need to promote it as quickly, too! It would also help to promote it for days following the event.

    In fact, you could create a recurring schedule for your promotion that could look something like this:

    • Day of event: Promote live chat and after show
    • 1 day after: Promote after show episode
    • 2 days after: Promote after show episode and ask for feedback
    • 3 days after: Ask for feedback and promote upcoming mid-week episode
    • 4 days after: Promote mid-week episode
    • 5 days after: Promote mid-week episode and encourage upcoming live participation
    • 6 days after (day before next event): Encourage upcoming live participation

    As you may notice, it's a balance of looking back and looking forward. Yes, that schedule is designed for two episodes per week, but you can adapt it based on your own schedule.

    People will care most about your podcast when the subject is already on their minds. So the more quickly you can publish your content about the current event, the more your existing and potential new audience will be interested in your episode.

    7. Watch for timely opportunities

    The actual event may not be the only opportunity you have to leverage the audience's energy. Watch for breaking news, birthdays, special releases, and other announcements you can use to create or promote relevant content.

    Also, the latest event could be connected to something from weeks, months, or even years ago. So this could be a great time for you to promote that older content. For example:

    • “It's been two years since we've seen [that character]! Here's the episode where we discussed his story. [Link]”
    • “Happy birthday to [person]! This was our favorite conversation about her: [Link]”
    • “The DVD and Blu-Ray for [movie] are now available! Listen to our original review: [Link]”
    • “[Movie sequel] was great! We reviewed it in [link], also hear what we thought of the original: [link]”

    Even if nothing is happening around the scheduled source content, you could have some hiatus episodes to feed the fandom. These could share news, spoilers, hindsight on the past year or season, hopes or theories for the future, and more! You could be a hero for keeping the conversation going when your audience isn't getting new content directly from the source.

    Thank you for the podcast reviews!

    • Scott Orr, host of Code 3, wrote in iTunes USA, “The Gold Standard. I ran into this podcast while I was looking into Audacity compressor settings. I've been podcasting for a while, but I figured I'd give this one a listen. I was blown away by the depth of Daniel's information. He offers easy-to-follow instructions on every part of podcasting, and I found that very useful! When I started my current podcast, Code 3, I put into practice many of the techniques and hints that Daniel recommends. I'm still implementing them…with 300 shows, I have yet to hear all of the advice he has. I've listened to several other ‘how to podcast' podcasts, and this one is clearly the gold standard. Plus, he's a Christian and isn't afraid to say so. Good for you, Daniel. And keep the content coming!”

    Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

    Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

    Announcements

    Need personalized podcasting help?

    I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

    Ask your questions or share your feedback

    Connect with me

    Disclosure

    This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

    ]]>
    https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/7-promotion-strategies-for-current-events-podcasts-tap309/feed/ 2 Podcast episodes about current events (including fan shows) may not have a long life, but you can still use them to promote and grow your podcast!
    A current-events podcast might cover news, politics, sports, TV shows, movies, books, music, and such. Essentially, anything that has a schedule and isn't as popular after it has passed.

    1. Build reputation in related communities
    2. Participate live
    3. Live-stream after the event
    4. Align publishing with the event schedule
    5. Account for other time zones
    6. Promote quickly
    7. Watch for timely opportunities

    Thanks to Scott Orr, host of http://Code3Podcast.com, for the 5-star podcast review!

    Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

    Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

    Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/309

    FEEDBACK
    Call (903) 231-2221
    Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
    Send a voice message from https://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

    MAILING ADDRESS
    The Audacity to Podcast
    PO Box 739
    Burlington, KY 41005]]>
    Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 34:42 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/7-promotion-strategies-for-current-events-podcasts-tap309/
    6 Ways to Make Your Content Live Longer – TAP308 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/bu3YARqmSOc/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/6-ways-to-make-your-content-live-longer-tap308/#comments Tue, 06 Jun 2017 12:00:04 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=13272

    “Long tail” is when a podcast episode has a long life of relevance and consumption. Learn what you can do to keep your old episodes alive and use them to grow your audience.

    1. Create timeless content

    If your older content doesn't have continuing relevance, there's not much sense in promoting it. By definition, timeless content doesn't refer to and is not restricted by any specific time. Timeless content from years ago could be equally helpful or entertaining today.

    So if you want your episodes to live long and prosper, they must be designed as such.

    Think about the movie industry. Old movies like It's a Wonderful Life are certainly “dated,” but the story of love, friendship, and hope will be forever relatable. That's why so many people continue watching it! (It's actually a Christmas Eve tradition in my parents' home!)

    Instructional content can sometimes be difficult to make timeless, depending on the type of instruction. If it's technology based, you have to assume it will change someday. But if your instructions are based on principles, they can transcend technologies.

    Unfortunately, not all content can be timeless. Podcasts about sports, news, politics, and other current events are inherently timely. Fan content, such as for movies, TV shows, music, and books are part timeless and part timely. If the content you base your show on has its own long tail, your podcast could, too. But the time of that content's release will usually be the best days for your episode about it.

    As much as possible, try to keep the bulk of your podcast timeless and then it will actually make sense to promote old content later.

    If your content can't be timeless, you might not benefit as much from this episode. But don't fret, because my next episode will be about better promoting timely podcasts!

    2. Keep the information updated

    As the world and your own perspective change, the information you shared may need to be updated. This form of maintenance is especially beneficial if your content attracts a lot of people from searches.

    For example, I recently updated the show notes for episode 126, “How to Change Your Podcast Information in iTunes/Apple Podcasts,” to include relevant information for the Libsyn RSS feed. I might also update the notes to reflect other changes in PowerPress and the podcast feeds in general.

    Updating your show notes is easy, and that should be the first priority. Updating the podcast may be a little more difficult, because you may want to edit in the new information or re-record. But there's a simpler method!

    First, as much as possible for instructional content, refer your audience to your show notes for the most updated information. If your instructions have changed enough that your recording may be overly outdated, you could simply prepend an announcement. For example, you could say, “Due to updates, the information in this episode has changed. So please [visit the show notes / visit this updated link] for the latest information.”

    If you edit the episode, you'll need to re-upload it, with the same filename, to your media host. On Libsyn and most other monthly-upload-limited services, replacing an old file will probably use up some of this month's upload allotment. But Blubrry Media Hosting offers “Long Tail Podcasting,” which allows you to replace any episode you've already uploaded with another by the same name and it won't count against your monthly limit. (The replacement must be within a 10% difference from the original file.)

    If you decide the updated information is important enough to record a new episode, then consider redirecting or at least linking the old episode to the new one.

    3. Cross-reference your content

    If your content remains relevant to your audience, you should have plenty of opportunities to cross-reference your previous content.

    When you do this, don't assume your audience remembers the old episode. You may need to remind them what it was about, quote from it, or mention it as a more in-depth resource. For example, now that I have an episode all about redirects, I can reference that episode anytime I talk about redirects, like I did in my episode 306, “How to Move Podcast Hosts and Your RSS Feed.”

    In my clean-comedy podcast, there are certain jokes or stories we reference, and we can tell our listener what episode to revisit to hear that full story.

    You can even plan this to your great advantage! Make a “cornerstone” episode (or even a series) that's so focused and core to your content that you reference it frequently. It could quickly become one of your most popular episodes.

    Anytime you can get your audience to engage more with your content, and it meets their needs (to be helped or entertained), they become more connected to you and your podcast, and thus more loyal.

    This kind of relevant cross-reference also helps your search-engine optimization (SEO) by showing the relationship between high-quality pieces of content. It could also help connect influencers with other pieces of content they may want to share, too, and thus further increase your ranking and reputation!

    If your older content has a descriptive title, consider using that for the hyperlink. For example, “Redirects and How to Use Them in Podcasting.” You hyperlink a description of the episode and its relevance, if the title isn't descriptive or doesn't flow well in the sentence. For example, “Learn more about the different kinds of redirects from my episode 280.”

    Whatever you do, don't merely paste the URL in your show notes or link it with simply, “Click here.”

    When you reference the old episode within your content, I recommend giving the episode number (if you use numbers) and point your audience to the your current episode's show notes for the link to the old episode. For example, “To hear that story, listen to episode 270, or click on the link in our show notes for this episode at [simple show notes URL].”

    4. Add your best episodes to an email autoresponder sequence

    If you have any kind of an email list, consider making it valuable to your audience with an autoresponder sequence (sometimes called “automation” or a “series”). This is a series of emails that send sequentially to every subscribe from when they first subscribe or take some action. So everyone receives email 1, then email 2, and so on, regardless of when they're added to the sequence.

    You can make these sequences be anything you want, and they can even do some automatic marketing for you! And you can also use this to promote your timeless episodes, especially those that are so far back your audience may have forgotten or maybe never even heard them.

    Here's an example of an email I'm adding to my own sequence:

    Hi, [First name]!

    You may hear people talk about “redirects.” This can be a URL—either memorable or simply hyperlinked somewhere—that redirects people who use it to somewhere else.

    For example, theaudacitytopodcast.com/siteground redirects visitors to my recommended web-hosting provider, SiteGround, through my affiliate link.

    The two most-popular redirect types are 301 permanent and 307 temporary. I recommend you use a permanent redirect for anything on your own site, and use a temporary redirect for anything on someone else's site (like /amazon) or that may ever change (such as /live).

    If you'd like to learn more about redirects and how to use them, I did an episode all about that!

    Click here to listen to “Redirects and How to Use Them.”

    Faithfully,

    Daniel J. Lewis

    Notice that the email gives value first? That makes it more likely someone will read it, stay subscribed, open future emails, and even click the link!

    But your emails could be simpler. For example:

    Hi, [First name]!

    Have you ever been confused by “redirects” and which one you should use?

    I have an episode all about that! Click here to listen!

    Faithfully,

    Daniel J. Lewis

    Sprinkle these kinds of reminders of your timeless content throughout an email sequence and it will help your audience engage more with your older content. It may even point them to the exact thing they needed but didn't know you had!

    If you need an email service provider, here are my recommendations, in this order:

    1. ActiveCampaign
    2. ConvertKit
    3. MailChimp
    4. Aweber

    5. Automate recurring shares

    Automation can save you time and help you engage your followers. It's not evil! For example, if you live-stream on a consistent schedule, why not schedule a recurring message to remind your followers that you're going live and give them the link to join? That will remind them of something they want, and it will save you the time and distraction when you're trying to start your show.

    If your content is timeless and thus still relevant today, why not reshare it? This could expose people to content they may have never known even existed. It can also bring new people to your podcast!

    I use a tool to automatically reshare my old but timeless content. From my personal Twitter account alone in the last month, 197 people viewed that old content. For 75 of those people, it was their first time visiting my podcast site! And I continue to see results like with almost no extra work on my part.

    This works by loading up a queue with compelling messages and links, and then an automation tool cycles through that content, publishing it for me on a set schedule.

    From my episodes about Internet- and WordPress-based automation, here are the tools I recommend:

    • Social Jukebox (save $10 through June 7, 2017 with promo code “SUPERJUKE10”)—My preferred social-automation tool. It's more affordable than the alternatives and I think it packs some better features.
    • Edgar—Probably the most-popular social-automation tool. It has a beautiful design and simple usability, but it's a bit pricey.
    • Revive Old Post / Revive Old Post Pro or Tweet Wheel / Tweet Wheel Pro—These are similar to the previous tools, but they're tied directly into and managed from your WordPress website.
    • Missinglettr—This is a new service I've signed up for. Give it your RSS feed and it will automatically pull shareable quotations, images, and make quotation images. Then, it can create a recurring campaign to share that old information for you. It's like the previous tools, but with multiple messages from and for the same content!

    6. Manually repost when relevant

    Even if you set up an automation tool, there may be times when your old content may be more relevant. For example, if your podcast reviewed the original Star Wars trilogy, then people might be interested in it when a new Star Wars movie is released.

    Or, continuing the movie example, you originally published your review when the movie was released in theaters. Now, it's being released on disc or download, so it's a good time to remind your audience of the original review.

    Thank you for the podcast reviews!

    • Michael Larsen (“Mkltesthead”), producer and frequent commentator on The Testing Show, wrote in iTunes USA, “Never Too Late to Learn/Refine Your Podcast. Even though I've been podcasting for years in various formats, as the producer of a niche technical podcast, I like to hear of ways/techniques to make my podcast the best it can be. Danel J Lewis ‘The Audacity to Podcast' is a terrific broad brush show that covers a lot of ground. If you are a new podcaster, you will learn so much to get off on the right foot. If you are a seasoned veteran, you will still learn a lot, as there is so much to the process of podcasting, including all of the “isms” and “ities” of your podcast to consider. Thank you, Daniel, I've really appreciated the content. Thank you for helping an old dog learn a few new tricks.”

    Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

    Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

    Announcements

    • My Zoom H6 for Podcasters course is almost complete! I shared the draft preview in Podcasters' Society and already heard from one member, “This is stellar. You're a freaking rockstar dude.” It will be available for purchase soon, but subscribers to my email list will get the opportunity to preorder at a discount!

    Need personalized podcasting help?

    I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

    Ask your questions or share your feedback

    Connect with me

    Disclosure

    This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

    ]]>
    https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/6-ways-to-make-your-content-live-longer-tap308/feed/ 3 "Long tail" is when a podcast has a long life of relevance and consumption. Learn how to keep your old episodes alive and use them to grow your audience.
    1. Create timeless content
    2. Keep the information updated
    3. Cross-reference your content
    4. Add your best episodes to an email autoresponder sequence
    5. Automate recurring shares
    6. Manually repost when relevant

    Thanks to Michael Larsen, from https://www.qualitestgroup.com, for the 5-star podcast review!

    Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com

    Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com

    Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/308

    FEEDBACK
    Call (903) 231-2221
    Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
    Send a voice message from https://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

    MAILING ADDRESS
    The Audacity to Podcast
    PO Box 739
    Burlington, KY 41005]]>
    Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 32:19 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/6-ways-to-make-your-content-live-longer-tap308/
    Why and How Your Podcast Needs Loudness Normalization – TAP307 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/INklyE2Y3ss/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/why-and-how-your-podcast-needs-loudness-normalization-tap307/#comments Tue, 30 May 2017 14:02:13 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=13223

    Loudness normalization conforms audio to a perceived loudness level. Learn why that's important in podcasting and how to make your podcast meet the standard.

    Why a loudness normalization standard matters

    Imagine you press play on a podcast episode. The intro music is a bit louder than the previous podcast you listened to, so you turn down the volume. Then, the main host comes in to introduce the topic, but they're quieter than the music, so you have to turn up the volume. Then, the cohost comes on and they're even quieter than the host, so you have to turn up the volume again or else not be able to hear them.

    After a while, they segue into their interview with some bumper music, which is much louder than their voices, so you rush to turn down the volume before you damage your ears. This is a separately recorded interview and you are, again, having to continuously adjust the volume level so you can hear both participants and not damage your hearing.

    At last, the podcast is over, but you have to turn down the volume one last time because the outro music is too loud. Then, the next podcast on your player starts playing, and it's too quiet, so you have to turn up the volume again, and the fight continues.

    Does that sound familiar? That kind of frustration happens every day and could happen to any podcast—even the professionally produced ones!

    That's why podcasts need loudness normalization! This would ensure the only time a listener must adjust their volume is when their environment changes, not when the podcast's audio changes.

    This volume-fighting annoyance could be easily solved with loudness normalization in three places:

    1. Within each episode—ensuring the participants and sound clips are all at the same loudness level.
    2. Across episodes—ensuring that all episodes of one podcast are the same loudness as each other.
    3. Across podcasts—ensuring that podcasts from separate creators are all the same loudness.

    Loudness normalization solves that by conforming all pieces of audio to the same standard.

    How loudness is measured

    Perceived loudness is now commonly indicated by “loudness units relative to full scale,” or “LUFS” (pronounced “luhfs”) for short. In the past, it was also called “loudness, K-weighted, relative to full scale” (LKFS), and there used to be some technical differences between LKFS and LUFS. But today, they're essentially the same—so much that whenever you see “LKFS” you can assume it also means “LUFS.”

    LUFS are an absolute measurement relative to the full scale of 0 dB. Thus, you'll see LUFS indicated with negative numbers: -16 LUFS, -19 LUFS, -23 LUFS, and such. (You may also hear people abbreviate “negative 19” to “neg 19” in speech).

    LUFS are an indication of the unit of measurement, which is actually “loudness units” (LU). LUs are equal units to decibels (dB). So if you need to amplify by 2 loudness units, you would simply amplify by 2 decibels.

    The algorithm behind LUFS is designed to measure long-term averages of audio, not mere peaks (like most normalization tools). For example, audio with a loud but momentary peak will barely affect the long-term measured loudness of the processed section. But a standard normalizer would raise or lower the audio so that that peak reaches a target level, regardless of the rest of the audio.

    Waveform with a momentary loud spot at the beginning, but consistent volume in the rest.

    Despite the louder portion in the beginning, this clip's loudness measurement would reflect the majority of the audio.

    Loudness normalization is, therefore, the measurement of only the average, long-term perceived loudness of audio. It actually has nothing to do with dynamic range or peaks.

    However, the user experience and perception of loudness is made of three parts:

    1. Loudness range (LRA): the statistical difference between loud and quiet over time, measured in loudness units (LU)
    2. Integrated/program loudness: the perceived loudness of selected audio, measured in LUFS
    3. True peak: the microsampled level of the loudest point in the audio (more accurate than a normal peak), measured in dB or dBTP (decibels true peak)

    Standard loudness-measurement tools will show you those three parts because they help you ensure a fully consistent loudness experience.

    For example, audio with a program loudness of -16 LUFS but a loudness range of 20 LU could have so much variation that a listener still has to fight with the volume controls. Thus, the loudness range should be reduced to make it more listenable, and then the whole renormalized to the target loudness.

    And although true peak is often measured in loudness tools, it actually doesn't affect our perception of the overall loudness. For example, audio at -16 LUFS with a true peak of -4 dB would sound the same as the audio with a true peak of -2 dB. That's because the peaks are so small that they are usually unnoticed. It's when audio peaks for a longer time that it becomes noticeable. Nonetheless, limiting the true peak reduces the chance for distortion.

    The loudness standard for podcasts

    Broadcast radio and television generally have a loudness standard of -23 LUFS (gated so it excludes measurement of audio below a reasonable threshold). But podcasts are Internet media and not broadcast radio or television. The technical considerations and environments are significantly different.

    Many popular media programs already offer loudness normalization through optional features (such as “voice boost,” “sound check,” and other terms). So when many of the greatest minds in audio engineering and contributors in broadcast standards proposed a loudness standard for podcasts, they align nicely with pre-existing common practices. This not only provides a consistent experience for Internet-based media, it also accounts for the diverse environments people consume Internet-based media.

    Thus, we have the standard of -16 LUFS for stereo and -19 LUFS for mono (more on the 3 dB difference in a moment). I've referred to this as a “proposed standard” for many years, but seeing the broad adoption and lack of significant support for any competing proposal, I'm now comfortable calling this the loudness standard for podcasts.

    The reason for the 3 dB difference between stereo and mono is because of “pan law” (or sometimes called “pan rule”). This is a mixing and recording principle based on the physics of sound. Pan law is intended to ensure a consistent volume level if you were to pan audio between left, right, or center it across two channels. Essentially, the doubling of a mono signal on most devices will result in a 3 dB increase in perceived volume. You may see this in audio-editing software where converting a stereo track to mono, or a mono to stereo will actually change the waveform, but may not affect the perceptual loudness.

    There are caveats and exceptions to this, and it seems the industry of apps and devices may never shift to fully compensate for pan law. Although that's the goal, in the meantime, we should account for pan law by making the adjustments ourselves based on the format of media we publish.

    That's why the standard for mono is 3 dB lower than for stereo. Although it will measure lower with most tools (but some tools actually measure mono and stereo to the same perceptual loudness), most apps and devices will play the -19 LUFS mono audio at the same loudness of a -16 LUFS stereo audio. Paul Figgiani has a nice explanation in “Podcast Loudness: Mono vs. Stereo Perception.”

    Here are two audio samples you can download and try yourself (right-click to save/download the WAV audio files):

    So, the loudness standard for podcasts is -16 LUFS for stereo and -19 LUFS for mono.

    In addition to that standard, there are some ideal targets for true peak and loudness range.

    I recommend the true peak not be any higher than -1.5 dB. This isn't part of the standard and there no requirement for what the true peak should be, only that it's best that it not go above that limit in order to minimize the chance of distortion.

    Loudness range (LRA) is something else to consider, but there's no standard on it, either, only a recommendation.

    There are several factors that could require different loudness ranges. Music, for example, is designed with a wide loudness range, and you may want to keep that (especially if your music fades in or out). But there could also be cases in your podcast that you would want the music to not have as much dynamic range, such as when it's in the background and you don't want the strong contrast to conflict with the foreground voices.

    In general, spoken word is probably best with a loudness range below 8 loudness units (LU). But consider the cause for the loudness range. For example, you may get emphatic during a portion of your content, and it might be important for the increased loudness to remain noticeable. But if you intend to stay at a consistent loudness and see a high loudness range, you may want to target an LRA below 6 LU or maybe even 4 LU. But if your audio starts sounding overly compressed and almost robotic, then your loudness range is probably too small.

    Also, the loudness range could be affected by variations between participants, where one person is consistently quieter than the other. In such a case, it would be better to normalize the multiple sources (whether on separate tracks or within a single track) to the same LUFS target so there's not as much loudness difference between them. If the voices are on separate tracks, then you can easily normalize them without compression, and the loudness range will also improve.

    Universal workflow for loudness normalization

    Ready to dig in? Even if you have a tool designed for loudness normalization (which I'll cover below), it's important to understand the whole loudness normalization workflow so you can make appropriate adjustments when necessary.

    The elements of loudness normalization and what affects them are as follows.

    • Loudness range (LRA) is affected either by vocal technique consistency and adjustable with compression, or it's affected by mismatched loudness from different tracks and adjustable with independent normalization.
    • Integrated/program loudness is affected by recording levels and adjustable with gain/amplification.
    • True peak (dBTP) is affected by the loudest points in your audio and is adjustable (or distortion prevented) with limiting.

    I made a video tutorial to demonstrate this process with exact details and how to use each tool. That's available exclusively to members of Podcasters' Society (if you're a member, click here to watch the tutorial). Here's a summary of the process (inspired by Paul Figgiani's “Podcast Loudness Processing Workflow”).

    1. Measure loudness range with r128x-GUI for macOS or Orban Loudness Meter for Windows.
    2. Compress if necessary to reduce the loudness range.
    3. Measure LUFS to see how offset they are.
    4. Adjust gain to an intermediate target of -24 for stereo, or -27 for mono.
    5. Hard limit to -9.5 dBTP, which is best with a true-peak limiter, but a standard limiter will probably be okay.
    6. Amplify by 8 dB.
    7. Remeasure to ensure you're at the target.
    8. Adjust gain if necessary, but a small variation in loudness is acceptable.

    These steps, along with the free measuring tools, will work with any audio-editing software, such as Audacity, GarageBand, and more.

    However, you may get better results or save more time by using tools designed for this exact thing.

    Easy tools for loudness normalization

    • r128x-GUI (free, macOS): for measuring loudness, LRA, and dBTP.
    • Orban Loudness Meter (free, Windows): for measuring loudness, LRA, and dBTP.
    • Auphonic (free and paid options; web, Windows, and macOS): my favorite tool for processing audio quickly and easily. You can set the target loudness, enable the adaptive leveler to reduce LRA, and it has an automatic true-peak limiter. Auphonic can also reduce background noise.
    • Adobe Audition's included “Match Volume” (paid, Windows and macOS): loudness normalization built right into my preferred digital audio workstation (DAW). The Match Volume tool works on files or multitrack clips and can measure and adjust to a customizable target, with built-in true-peak limiting. However, it doesn't measure or affect LRA, so you may need to do that separately.
    • Adobe Audition's included “Loudness Radar” (paid, Windows and macOS): not for normalizing, but for visually measuring. This will show you the loudness, LRA, and dBTP of any played audio. It even works if you use the playback shuttle to play your audio faster!
    • Hindenburg Journalist and Journalist Pro: the best standalone, single-purchase DAWs for podcasting, in my opinion! Both Journalist and Journalist Pro can automatically loudness-normalize any clip you drop into the editor. Then, you can export with a target loudness preset.
    • FixMyLevels (free and paid options, web): the new kid on the block in loudness normalization. FixMyLevels has more aggressive algorithms than Auphonic, and they have designed it specifically for podcasts. It's free to try during the beta stage and seems it will cost less than Auphonic once launched.
    • Standing Water Studios Simple & Mighty (SWS / S&M) extensions for Reaper (plugin is free, Reaper is paid, Windows and macOS): measurement and normalization within the popular and inexpensive Reaper DAW. More information here.

    There are other tools for measuring and adjusting audio, too. Either through a plugin, standalone app, or built-in feature. With these measurement tools, “online” refers to during playback, while “offline” can analyze the audio faster than real time and without playback.

    Thank you for the podcast reviews!

    • Zachary Webb wrote in iTunes USA, “Daniel provides great information on the Audacity to Podcast. The way he shares information is easy to understand. Thanks for doing this podcast, Daniel!”
    • Sean Hiland, host of Slept in Government Class, wrote in iTunes USA, “Utility, Clarity, Sincerity: These are the three words I first think when I listen to Daniel's episodes. I always hear something I can use and never have to filter through garbage to get to the gold. Daniel also presents a clear desire to help people improve at something he truly loves. When I was first starting out, I listened to Daniel AFTER I paid for a website service my new podcast didn't need. Thanks to Daniel, I was able to get a refund before the trial period ran out. That's real utility in a format I can enjoy.”

    Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

    Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

    Announcements

    • Watch for my upcoming Zoom H6 course, available first and free to members in Podcasters' Society!

    Need personalized podcasting help?

    I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

    Ask your questions or share your feedback

    Connect with me

    Disclosure

    This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

    ]]>
    https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/why-and-how-your-podcast-needs-loudness-normalization-tap307/feed/ 4 Loudness normalization conforms audio to a perceived loudness level. Learn why that's important in podcasting and how to make your podcast meet the standard.
    Thanks to Sean Hiland, from http://sleptinclass.com, and Zachary Webb for the 5-star podcast reviews!

    Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com

    Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com

    Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/307

    FEEDBACK
    Call (903) 231-2221
    Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
    Send a voice message from https://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

    MAILING ADDRESS
    The Audacity to Podcast
    PO Box 739
    Burlington, KY 41005]]>
    Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 35:20 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/why-and-how-your-podcast-needs-loudness-normalization-tap307/
    How to Move Podcast Hosts and Your RSS Feed – TAP306 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/6ExOMuxguxQ/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-move-podcast-hosts-and-your-rss-feed-tap306/#comments Tue, 23 May 2017 12:00:10 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=13200

    Moving podcast hosting companies and keeping your subscribers doesn't have to be complicated. Here's what you need to know, especially to avoid losing your entire audience.

    Before you move podcast hosts

    Don't rush

    I've seen many podcasters hurt their own shows because they were too quick to make a move (often for the wrong reasons) and didn't know or outright ignored the consequences.

    Although moving is a relatively simple process, skipping something important or making the wrong decision could make you lose your entire audience with literally a single click.

    Don't wait too long

    Although it's good to take your time, don't wait until the last day of your current provider's billing period to move your podcast. This process is usually quick, but as you'll see soon, some steps are best done with some time to let them sit.

    Move for the right reasons

    Podcast-hosting companies are designed to provide two core features and an optional third:

    1. A content-distribution network (CDN) to serve your media files quickly and take the load off your website
    2. Industry-standard, reliable, and accurate download statistics
    3. (Optional) Fully customizable podcast-ready RSS feed

    Some podcast-hosting companies may provide additional features, such as automations, sponsorship opportunities, live-streaming, a basic website, crowdfunding, and such. These features can be useful for some. But they are features you must opt in to use.

    It's not the podcast-hosting company's responsibility to promote your podcast, submit it to all the podcast apps and directories, make your podcast discoverable, or handle your content. Like the opt-in features, these are also your responsibility.

    So never think that your podcast will grow better on one host over the other. These companies provide tools and services you must use to promote and grow your podcast yourself.

    That said, here are some good reasons to move podcasts hosts.

    • To have more control and ownership over your feed
    • To get better stats (unless you're already using the industry leaders)
    • To get better built-in features for your desired workflow (such as WordPress integration, standalone apps, live-streaming, or a managed website when you don't want your own platform)
    • To save a large amount of money (moving merely to save a few dollars might not actually be worth it)
    • To have more reliable stability
    • To save your podcast from a failing hosting provider (cough, SoundCloud, cough)

    Choose a new company that truly understands podcasting

    Because moving your podcast hosting and especially the feed are delicate processes, it's vital that you choose a company you can trust to do the right thing.

    I can't recommend any company that:

    • Can't migrate your media for you
    • Doesn't mirror the GUIDs (more on this below)
    • Doesn't have an available support staff

    This is why I recommend only these three companies:

    • Blubrry—best for a WordPress-based workflow
    • Libsyn—best for a standalone workflow and mobile app
    • Spreaker—best for a live-streaming workflow and multiple shows

    Try any of these three (or even Podbean) with promo code “noodle” and you'll get at least one month free.

    If your old and new hosts understand podcasting

    I hate to say that some podcast-hosting companies don't understand podcasting, but it's unfortunately true. They may be ignorant of vital smaller details that can have serious ramifications on your podcast and your audience.

    But assuming both your old and new hosts fully understand podcasting (or at least enough to allow you to leave the old host), here are the steps you should follow.

    1. Migrate your media

    My top podcast-hosting recommendations, Blubrry and Libsyn, offer simple media migration. With Blubrry, it's free and can be easily done yourself within PowerPress. With Libsyn, it costs a flat rate ($25 for up to 10 GB as of April, 2017) and you only have to request it and they do it for you.

    If you don't migrate your old episodes, you risk losing them forever (if you didn't backup your masters) and it means new subscribers won't be able to enjoy your old content.

    If you're simply switching feed-creation/enhancement tools (such as from FeedBurner to PowerPress, Libsyn, or Spreaker) and your media isn't being moved, then you don't have to worry about migrating the files.

    2. Copy and update all your feed data

    Blubrry's and Libsyn's migrations will automatically copy all your podcast information from your old feed to your new one. But it's still a good idea to double-check that the information is all where it should be.

    This is also a good time to consider updating some of the information, such as the web address, copyright, description, and maybe even the cover art.

    3. Mirror the GUIDs

    Some cheap podcast hosts may say they migrate all the feed data, but they forget about the globally unique identifier (GUID) for each episode.

    The GUID is how podcast apps know whether an episode has been downloaded before. The GUIDs may be a URL or a random string of characters. The GUID's actual value is almost irrelevant, but it's crucial that it remain the same on your new host.

    If the GUID is changed, even by a single character, podcast apps will think the episode is new and thus force a redownload.

    I've seen this happen far too many times to big-name podcasters (who, unfortunately, chose a cheap new host) and it causes their entire back catalog of episodes to redownload. This effectively invalidates the stats and frustrates the audience.

    Blubrry and Libsyn do mirror the GUIDs for you, but I don't know of any other companies that do, too.

    4. Update the media URLs (if applicable)

    If you're moving only your media and not your RSS feed, then you need to update all your old media URLs.

    If you use PowerPress, this could be as simple as going to PowerPress ➜ Tools ➜ Find and Replace for Episode URLs. There, enter the old URL path (less the filenames) with the new one. For example, “Find in URL” http://myawesomepodcast.com/media/ and “Replace with” http://traffic.libsyn.com/myawesomepodcast/.

    However, this is only easy if both the new and old media URLs follow their own consistent patterns. SoundCloud and some other cheap hosts have a completely different URL for every media file. In such a case, you would have to manually update the media URL for all your past episodes one at a time.

    But if your new host handles the migration and creates your new feed for you, then they'll update the media URLs in the new feed and you won't have to worry about it.

    5. Insert <itunes:new-feed-url> into your new feed

    Apple's <itunes:new-feed-url> tag is a good extra step to confirm its Podcasts app and iTunes are reading the correct RSS feed, and to more quickly update the catalog and subscriptions.

    It's pointless to put this on the old feed if the old feed is being redirected. That's because a redirect happens before the feed contents are loaded.

    6. Test and validate the new feed

    Before you throw the final switch, subscribe to your own new feed and ensure it looks and works properly. You could also test it with Podbase Podcast Validator and Cast Feed Validator. It would be horrible if you point all your subscribers to a new feed and it's actually broken!

    7. Update the “original feed” in FeedBurner (if applicable)

    If you're using FeedBurner, login and update the feed URL it's using as the “original feed.” This is also necessary to do if you're completely leaving FeedBurner.

    If you're simply leaving FeedBurner's horrible “SmartCast” feature, you may not need to update the original feed if it's already the feed with your podcast information in it (such as a PowerPress feed).

    8. Place a 301 permanent redirect on the old feed forever

    The final step, and the switch that makes all your subscribers start using your new feed, is to redirect the old feed to the new one.

    This must be with a 301 permanent redirect. As the name makes obvious, this communicates a permanent switch. It's like telling the post office not to temporarily hold your mail, but to forward all your mail to your new address and notify every sender of the address change. Learn more about redirects in episode 280.

    If the redirect isn't a 301 permanent redirect, then podcast apps won't update where they look for your feed.

    Unfortunately, not all podcast apps make a permanent change when they load a 301 permanent redirect. Thus, you need to keep that old feed URL redirecting to the new one forever, if possible.

    With FeedBurner, you do this by deleting a feed and enabling “With permanent redirection” before you complete the process. But then never permanently delete the feed from your FeedBurner account.

    With Libsyn, a lifetime redirect is unfortunately a $25 fee, but they'll keep it online even if you close your Libsyn account.

    Blubbry and some other providers will place a lifetime permanent redirect for free on request.

    If you own the old feed URL, then you can redirect it yourself. But ensure you keep that domain renewed!

    In an absolute worst-case scenario, keep the 301 permanent redirect in place for at least 90 days and let your audience know they may have to resubscribe if they stop receiving episodes.

    Last resorts if your old host doesn't understand podcasting well

    I'd like to assume you're at least moving to a good host, like Blubrry, Libsyn, or Spreaker. But I know we were all young and ignorant once, so we may have made some mistakes in our pasts. So, if you've made some mistakes, too, and are moving from a bad “podcast hosting” company, here are some different things you could try.

    Unlike the previous section, these are not sequential steps, but different things you could try in order to save your podcast from the shriveled clutches of the undead. (Notice that “shriveled clutches” is abbreviated “SC”? That was actually unintentional, but oh so appropriate!)

    Try to follow the previous steps

    If you're moving to a good new host, then they'll be able to do all the good stuff they're supposed to do. They may even be able to tell you the precise steps you need to take to leave your old host.

    Try to get a 301 permanent redirect on the old feed

    Regardless of what bad podcast hosting companies may say, they do have the ability to place a 301 redirect on their servers. So it's really a matter of whether they're willing to do that for departing customers.

    But if you can get a 301 permanent redirect, get it! Even if it means paying for a few extra months so the redirect can be there for at least 90 days.

    Try to get <itunes:new-feed-url> in the old feed

    Some providers may not be willing to place a 301 permanent redirect but they will let you place custom RSS tags in your feed. (Podomatic is one such company.) This may mean upgrading your account for a few months, but it might be worth it to keep your hard-earned audience!

    Update the URL in the following code to use in the old feed when you can't get a 301 redirect.

    <itunes:new-feed-url>http://new-feed-url.goes/here</itunes:new-feed-url>

    Like a 301 redirect, leave this in place for at least 90 days. In the meantime, publish a “please resubscribe” episode in this old feed. More on that below.

    Update the feed URL in the major podcast apps (or contact their support team)

    Most podcast apps and directories will appropriately handle a 301 permanent redirect and update their own databases. But watch out for those that don't. You may have to login to a portal and update the feed URL, or you may have to contact their support.

    For example, with iTunes and Apple Podcasts, a 301 redirect and <itunes:new-feed-url> tag will work properly, but if you're not able to do either of those, this is one of the few moments you would need to change the feed URL in your Podcasts Connect account, or ask Apple's support to do it for you if you don't have access to the podcast.

    Submit a new feed to podcast apps and directories and have the old one removed

    Absolute worst-case scenario is to submit your new podcast feed all over again to the apps and directories and ask them to remove the old one.

    But if you didn't place a 301 redirect on your old feed, simply updating the directories (either through resubmission or through a URL update) will probably not carryover all your existing subscribers.

    Publish a “please resubscribe” episode in your old feed

    If you couldn't get a 301 redirect on your old feed, or you're not able to keep it forever, remove all the old episodes and publish a single “please resubscribe” episode. In this short episode, explain why they need to resubscribe, how to do it, and point them to a website with the new subscription links or instructions.

    It's far from ideal to ask your audience to go through the resubscribe process, but it's better than completely losing them.

    Accept that you may lose some subscribers

    Whether through poor technology implementations, incompatibilities, or even mere differences in statistics algorithms, you may see a drop in your download numbers. Even if it actually means fewer people are subscribed than before, at least you can know that those who stayed are probably more loyal.

    If you need help with this process, I can either help you in Podcasters' Society or refer you to another podcast consultant.

    Thank you for the podcast reviews!

    • Lee Ann Hopkins, host of Hooray Weekly, wrote in iTunes USA, “The Podcaster's Podcast. Daniel J. Lewis is a gift of the highest caliber. I only learned about The Audacity to Podcast AFTER I had started my podcast, Hooray Weekly. I wish that I had been listening to him long before I started publishing my podcast. Every week I learn so many things. I can't tell you how many times I've exclaimed, ‘so THAT's how you do it effectively and efficiently!' As the commercial goes, ‘I could've had a V-8!' He's so awesome, I think I've got to hire him! Thank you, Daniel. Keep on, keeping on! You're a gem!”
    • Andrew B. Steiner, host of Weirdball, wrote in iTunes USA, “Big fan! … It really inspires me to keep evolving with my own show, Weirdball. ”

    Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

    Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

    Announcements

    Need personalized podcasting help?

    I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

    Ask your questions or share your feedback

    Connect with me

    Disclosure

    This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

    ]]>
    https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-move-podcast-hosts-and-your-rss-feed-tap306/feed/ 4 Moving podcast hosting companies and keeping your subscribers doesn't have to be complicated. Here's what you need to know, especially to avoid losing your entire audience.
    Before you move podcast hosts:
    - Don't rush
    - Don't wait too long
    - Move for the right reasons
    - Choose a new company that truly understands podcasting

    If your old and new hosts understand podcasting:
    1. Migrate your media
    2. Copy and update all your feed data
    3. Mirror the GUIDs
    4. Update the media URLs (if applicable)
    5. Insert into your new feed
    6. Test and validate the new feed
    7. Update the "original feed" in FeedBurner (if applicable)
    8. Place a 301 permanent redirect on the old feed forever

    Last resorts if your old host doesn't understand podcasting well:
    - Try to follow the previous steps
    - Try to get a 301 permanent redirect on the old feed
    - Try to get in the old feed
    - Update the feed URL in the major podcast apps (or contact their support team)
    - Submit a new feed to podcast apps and directories and have the old one removed
    - Publish a "please resubscribe" episode in your old feed

    Accept that you may lose some subscribers

    Thanks to Lee Ann Hopkins, from http://www.hoorayliving.com, and Andrew B. Steiner, from http://weirdball.com/sphinx, for the 5-star podcast reviews!

    Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com

    Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com

    Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/306

    FEEDBACK
    Call (903) 231-2221
    Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
    Send a voice message from https://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

    MAILING ADDRESS
    The Audacity to Podcast
    PO Box 739
    Burlington, KY 41005]]>
    Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 49:49 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-move-podcast-hosts-and-your-rss-feed-tap306/
    Is There an Ideal Length for Podcast Episodes? – TAP305 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/4iG5R8jMKmQ/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/is-there-an-ideal-length-for-podcast-episodes-tap305/#comments Tue, 16 May 2017 12:00:45 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=13188

    Episode length is sometimes a heated discussion in podcasting. There's helpful data from different sources. But what's right for your podcast? I'll help you decide!

    I suggest a “who, what, when, where, how, and why” approach to determining the perfect podcast length for yourself.

    Who is your audience?

    Because most podcasts target separate niches, it can be very difficult to make blanket recommendations on all podcasts.

    Many of the podcasts from public-radio showrunners are intentionally and skillfully designed to reach a broad, general audience. But your podcast may reach a smaller, more focused audience that may never be interested in general content (or general perspective).

    When you get to know your audience, you can better understand their specific needs and situations. For example:

    • New moms may not have much listening time while caring for young children.
    • Business executives may not have time to listen during business hours, but they want to continue their education away from the office.
    • Kids may have a shorter attention span, especially for non-entertaining content.
    • Agricultural workers may have many lonely hours away from the Internet, and they may be eager for something stimulating.

    Thus, you can probably imagine that a 5-minute podcast could be ideal for one audience, but too short for another. Inversely, a three-hour podcast could be ideal for one audience, but too long for another.

    Your listener is the most important person to your podcast (“Duh,” right?). So what's the best way to serve them?

    What is your subject?

    Because broadcast media reach a wide audience, they need topics that appeal to the general population. That's why most long-form radio talk shows are about money, relationships (including religion), tech, politics, and sports. That information interests nearly everyone.

    But podcasts are far more focused. You don't have to worry about appealing to employees on their rush-hour commute home. You only have to be concerned with the smaller group of people interested in your subject.

    And not all subjects are equal. Although it's possible that nearly any subject could be shared (to some degree) in a few minutes or in a few hours, some subjects may be better at different lengths. For example:

    • Educational content depends on the depth of the information. It's good to be short when it's a lot to take in (for example, Grammar Girl). But it can also be good to be long when a concept needs more explanation to be understood.
    • Inspirational content may be good enough to be short. Think of all the devotional-style books that provide quick inspiration and make it easy to consume each day.
    • Entertaining content that is good will probably never be long enough. Look at how well the Lord of the Rings extended editions sell compared to Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace. They're both entertaining, but the quality of one far outweighs the quality of the other.

    Some podcasts may be harder to consume because their subjects require uninterrupted attention. But you can easily stave off that concern by ensuring your content is segmented in a way that is friendly to multiple listening sessions.

    No Agenda is a twice-weekly, three-hour-long podcast that has huge success. I listen to it, myself, and I listen all the way through (except for the techno stuff at the end). I don't complain about the length because the episodes are entirely informative and entertaining. But there's no way that I could listen to a single Grammar Girl episode for three hours!

    So what is appropriate for your subject? Do you need more time to explain something, or do you need only a few minutes? Do you have enough good content that will rapture people from time?

    When do you publish?

    I've always considered frequency and length to be closely associated. Daily shows may seem lucrative, but they take a lot of work. Plus, daily shows can be more difficult for listeners to stay current, depending on their own schedules and the length of your episodes.

    Your publishing schedule needs to be a consideration with your episodes. In general, I recommend more frequent shows to be shorter and less frequent shows to be longer.

    But that's not a hard rule, either! No Agenda publishes twice a week and it's three hours long. Grammar Girl is once a week and it's usually shorter than 15 minutes. And I don't see many people (if any) complaining about the length or frequency of either.

    Thus, while your audience will really care more about the value you provide than the length or even frequency, your personal schedule may be the bigger issue. It's generally much easier to create short podcasts than long ones. So you may be able to give your best value only if you make shorter episodes when you publish more frequently.

    Where does your audience listen?

    According to “The Infinite Dial” study (and “The Podcast Consumer” report), by Edison Research, 51% of Americans cite their home as the top place they consume podcasts most. That's followed by 22% in an automobile and 14% at work.

    But where they ever listen is 84% at home, 65% in an automobile, 42% walking around / on foot, 39% at work, 29% excercising, and 29% on public transportation. (These total more than 100% because this was a multichoice question.)

    Different locations have different mental freedoms and practical limitations. At home has the most freedoms and least limitations, while at an office job probably has the least freedoms and most limitations. Driving and exercising probably have plenty of mental freedom, but also plenty of practical limitations.

    According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the average American commute is 25.4 minutes. While that's helpful to know, (especially in considering how long certain topics could be in your show), it doesn't have to influence episode length.

    Even if someone listens at 1× for only 25.4 minutes on their way to work, the podcast is still there for them when they get back in their automobile to go home. It's probably even easier for them to resume listening than to switch podcasts! The more interesting and relevant the content is to them, the more likely they'll be to resume listening, and perhaps continue listening across multiple sessions.

    Consider, for example, if your podcast helps employees with daily inspiration or education. It would make sense for that content to fit within their commute so they can consume it completely before their commute is over.

    Then again, average commute lengths could be completely irrelevant to your own show.

    How do you present your message?

    Presentation is equally as important as content. You can have great content, but people won't benefit from it if it's presented horribly. You can also have the presentation skills of the greatest public speakers, but bad content will leave people empty.

    If you can maintain your energy level, the quality of content, and the relevance to your audience for only 20 minutes, then that's your ideal length. If you can maintain it for longer, then a longer show could be an option (though not a necessity).

    In Beyond Powerful Radio, Valerie Geller said, “There is no such thing as too long, only too boring.”

    I host a fan podcast about the TV show Once Upon a Time. Because it's a broadcast show, it must fit a specific amount of time. There have been many times we've called episodes or scenes “filler” while other things seemed too cut. The hard clock they have to follow both forces them to make content and limits them from telling the full story. That's why movies can often tell a story better: they don't necessarily have an imposed clock format they have to follow.

    Why length actually doesn't matter much

    Some broadcasters (such as those beyond Bridge Ratings) have said that because the average commute is 25.4 minutes, your podcast episodes should be able that long, too. But as I've demonstrated, there are many more factors and success stories at all points in the spectrum.

    In addition to No Agenda, Dan Carlin's Hardcore History is another podcast with extremely long episodes (up to 6 hours!), but the length hasn't held back these podcasts! In fact, Rob Walch, VP of Podcaster Relations at Libsyn (the largest podcast host and distribution platform) has said that among their customers 84% of the podcasts with more than 100,000 downloads per episode are longer than 51 minutes.

    Even Edison Research's own findings confirm that long form isn't a problem. According to their study in 2017, the average podcast-consumer listens to 5 hours and 7 minutes across 5 podcasts per week. Thus, the average length of a consumed episode is 61.4 minutes. This is actually more a reflection of how long the episodes are that the participants listen to, than a reflection of the success

    Again, these are all averages and broad studies. They can be nicely informative, but the diverse niches in podcasts make the data almost impossible to apply without deeper, segmented studies.

    I like to summarize it this way:

    The ideal length of a podcast episode is the same as the ideal length of string: as long as it needs to be.Click To Tweet

    Thank you for the podcast reviews!

    • Chris, from Real World Redneck Outdoor Adventure Podcast, wrote in iTunes USA, “Inspiring and Helpful. Thank you for the many useful tips and tricks that you share. You have inspired me to start my own podcast called ‘Real World Redneck Podcast.' It's a show about outdoor adventures and hacks. Still a little rough around the edges, but I'm having a blast! Thanks again.
    • Nivek Thompson, from Real Democracy Now!, wrote in iTunes Australia, “I've listened to the Audacity to Podcast on and off since I started my podcast journey mid-2016. I recently came across the automation series and it was just what I needed. Real Democracy Now! a podcast is a passion project for me and I do everything (with some graphic design help from my daughter). So it was wonderful to be talked through a range of automation tools that will help me reduce some of the workload of producing a weekly podcast. I really like the series approach as it makes it easy to listen and to check the Show Notes without having to search a huge back catalogue to find relevant material. If you are a podcaster, especially a newbie like me, this series will be invaluable.”

    Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

    Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

    Announcements

    Need personalized podcasting help?

    I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

    Ask your questions or share your feedback

    Connect with me

    Disclosure

    This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

    ]]>
    https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/is-there-an-ideal-length-for-podcast-episodes-tap305/feed/ 3 Episode length is sometimes a heated discussion in podcasting. There's helpful data from different sources. But what's right for your podcast? I'll help you decide!
    - Who is your audience?
    - What is your subject?
    - When do you publish?
    - Where does your audience listen?
    How do you present your message?
    - Why length actually doesn't matter much

    Thanks to Chris, from https://www.realworldredneck.com, and Nivek Thompson, from http://realdemocracynow.com.au, for the 5-star podcast reviews!

    Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

    Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

    Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/305

    FEEDBACK
    Call (903) 231-2221
    Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
    Send a voice message from https://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

    MAILING ADDRESS
    The Audacity to Podcast
    PO Box 739
    Burlington, KY 41005]]>
    Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 36:27 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/is-there-an-ideal-length-for-podcast-episodes-tap305/
    How to Get Good Audio from Your Podcast Guests – TAP304 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/9yduRaT96ws/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-get-good-audio-from-your-podcast-guests-tap304/#comments Tue, 09 May 2017 15:32:33 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=13171

    Interviewing non-podcasters presents many challenges, so here's my advice to ensure you get the best sound quality possible from your podcast guests.

    This has been one of the most-requested topics. More recently requested by Max Flight, Onai, Jeremy Jackson, Candice Jones, and Mike Rapin.

    We podcasters can tend to obsess over audio quality. It's certainly important to ensure your audience can hear and understand you, but remember that nearly no one subscribes to a podcast solely because of its audio quality. (Though a lack of good audio quality is certainly a reason people unsubscribe.)

    Thus, the following tips will help you find a balance of audio quality and other factors so that you can deliver the best podcast reasonably possible.

    Make it easy for your guest

    Your guest is doing you a favor by being on your show. They're already taking time out of their busy schedules to spend it with you, often times knowing that they may not get much value in return. So why make it difficult for them?

    Shipping microphones, using multi-ender recording tools, and more can be great ways to ensure the utmost audio quality from your guest. But using any of these could be a bit too much for your guest, especially when it requires installing apps, creating accounts, connecting equipment, and such.

    For some guests, even getting Skype could be too much to ask!

    So work with what you can. If your guest has a smartphone, that may be the easiest option that also returns the best results.

    Installing and using apps—Skype, FaceTime, Ringer, or anything else—may be easier than on a computer. Plus, most smartphones have really good microphones, so you only need an app to use that good microphone. Thus, having your guest use a voice over IP (VoIP) app on their device, but holding their device as if they were making a phone call puts that high-quality microphone near their voice.

    Using the handset also reduces the chances of rustling noises, filtering, and other issues that can negatively affect the audio quality through any kind of headset or earpiece.

    If this isn't possible, compromise and accept a standard phone call.

    What's more important: that all your guests have great audio quality but you can't get the guests you really want, or that you get the guests you want but with lower audio quality?

    Focus on the message

    Your audience consumes your podcast because of the messages you share, not because of the audio quality and maybe not even because of the guest themselves. Thus, it's far more important for you to bring those messages to the world than to obsess over getting pristine audio quality.

    Yes, try to get the best results you can. But don't sacrifice a great message simply because the audio isn't studio-quality. As long as your audience can hear and understand your guest and their message, the audio quality is acceptable.

    Maintain your own audio quality

    It's okay if you can't get the best audio quality from your guest, but your own audio needs to be its usual best. This is because you are your podcast's “constent.”

    We're actually quite used to this kind of mismatch. In radio and television, it's quite common for special guests to be joining through a simple phone call.

    So however you record your guest's audio, I recommend you record your own with your normal means—even if your call-recorder is also recording you. This will ensure your own audio is consistent. This also reduces the chances of your call-recorder's capturing your voice in a lower audio quality. And such differences usually are noticeable.

    Encourage good mic technique and environment

    In many ways, technique and environment affect audio quality more than the gear itself.

    Please don't overwhelm your guest with pages of instructions; remember that they're doing you a favor. But here are some quick points you're welcome to copy the section relevant to your connection method.

    So you'll sound the best and my audience can hear your message, please follow these recommendations:

    [For VoIP]

    1. Stay 4–6 inches (10–15 cm) from your microphone.
    2. Wear headphones.
    3. Go somewhere quiet. If you hear something, the microphone probably can, too.
    4. Turn off notification sounds or set to DND.
    5. Try to stay still.
    6. Don't worry if something goes wrong.

    [For telephone]

    1. Don't use speakerphone.
    2. Go somewhere quiet. If you hear something, the phone probably can, too.
    3. Turn off notification sounds or set to DND.
    4. Try to stay still.
    5. Don't worry if something goes wrong.

    I recommend giving them only the set of recommendations relevant to them. That will keep it the most simple.

    For your benefit, here's why I suggest those recommendations.

    • Stay 4–6 inches (10–15 cm) from your microphone—Reverb and room noise increase with distance from the microphone.
    • Wear headphones—This eliminates potential echo and audio feedback.
    • Don't use speakerphone—Not only is speakerphone usually used to allow distance from the mic, it also usually creates audio feedback and over-amplifies the microphone.
    • Go somewhere quiet. If you hear something, the microphone probably can, too—You don't have to educate them on acoustics. “Quiet” is good enough.
    • Turn off notification sounds or set to DND—Skype, Slack, email, calendar events, and more notifications can create a distracting background noise, especially if the device making the noise is the same as what's capturing their voice.
    • Try to stay still—This reduces the chances of rustling noise if they're wearing or holding the “microphone,” and reduces the chances of bumping the mic if it's detached.
    • Don't worry if something goes wrong—This can help assure them things don't have to be perfect and they don't have to apologize for minor distractions.

    It can take skill, but it's possible to handle or even integrate distractions into the message. Consider how Professor Robert Kelly's interviewed on BBC News could have gone better:

    BONUS! I ran across this funny parody:

    You may still have a guest who ignores or didn't read your recommendations. when you're connected. In such a case, focus on the smallest things you can do to return the best results.

    If your guest is a fellow podcaster, you can hold them to a higher standard and inform them when their audio may not be working as expected (such as having the wrong microphone selected).

    Separate guest and studio audio

    Multitrack covers a multitude of sins. If your guest's audio can be recorded into its own track, then you have a whole lot more flexibility to fix and improve the audio in your postproduction:

    • Fix volume differences
    • Reduce background noise
    • Edit out crosstalk or overly active listening
    • Apply separate compression and EQ for improved quality

    For more information about recording in multitrack, listen to these past episodes:

    Match loudness

    Your audience will accept lower audio quality as long as they can still hear and understand the guest. The most common fault I hear in interviews is mismatched loudness between the host and guest.

    This is much easier to fix if you've recorded your voice and your guest's separately.

    What I love about loudness normalization standards is that we finally have a way to measure and ensure consistent volume levels within and across episodes.

    This is more than “peak normalization.” It ensures the perceived loudness is consistent.

    The simplest way to match loudness is with Auphonic (online or desktop app). You can also normalize the loudness with your editing software.

    Usually, the process involves:

    • Compression—to reduce the loudness range
    • Limiting—to ensure the audio peaks never distort by going beyond a limit
    • Target amplification—to raise or lower the results to match a target loudness standard (for podcasts, -16 LUFS stereo, -19 LUFS mono)

    (I have tutorials for loudness normalization inside Podcasters' Society.)

    Tools to help you record podcast guests

    (Updated May 9, 2017.)

    • Skype, Hangouts (or Hangouts on Air), Zoom, Facetime (macOS and iOS)—These are the most popular VoIP tools for connecting with others in higher quality audio.
    • RingrZencastr, and Cast—These multi-ender VoIP tools handle the conference call and record each participant into separate tracks at the local source. Thus, there's almost no risk of bandwidth problems distorting the quality. They run through a browser or iOS/Android app.
    • Ecamm Call Recorder for Skype (macOS), Ecamm Call Recorder for Facetime (macOS), MP3 Skype Recorder (Windows), Pamela for Skype (Windows)—These are single-app call recorders that do their jobs well, but are limited to specific apps. Also, because they integrate directly with the VoIP apps, any update has the potential to break the integration.
    • Loopback (macOS), Audio Hijack (macOS), Voicemeeter (Windows), Virtual Audio Cable (Windows)—These apps can record or virtually reroute from any source on your PC. Because they're standalone, you can use them with any VoIP tool.
    • JK Audio CellTap 4C Wireless Phone Audio Tap—This device connects to any mobile device's 3.5 mm TRRS audio jack (or adapter) and splits the audio into left and right channels to output to a stereo recorder via 3.5 mm TRS. Learn more in my video from NAB Show 2015.
    • Skype Out / Skype In, Google Voice, UberConference, Anchor—These tools allow you to make or receive telephone calls. They may have recording capabilities, but they're using recording both sides at telephone quality and mixed into a single track.
    • Sound Recorder (Windows), Windows Voice Recorder (Windows), and QuickTime (macOS)—These preinstalled (or officially free) apps could be the easiest way for a guest to record audio from their own PC, if you want to do it that way.

    Thank you for the podcast reviews!

      Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

      Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

      Need personalized podcasting help?

      I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

      Ask your questions or share your feedback

      Connect with me

      Disclosure

      This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

      ]]>
      https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-get-good-audio-from-your-podcast-guests-tap304/feed/ 2 Interviewing non-podcasters presents many challenges, so here's my advice to ensure you get the best sound quality possible from your podcast guests.
      - Make it easy for your guest
      - Focus on the message
      - Maintain your own audio quality
      - Encourage good mic technique and environment
      - Separate guest and studio audio
      - Match loudness

      Visit https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/304 for the list of tools to help you record podcast guests

      Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

      Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

      Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/304

      FEEDBACK
      Call (903) 231-2221
      Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
      Send a voice message from https://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

      MAILING ADDRESS
      The Audacity to Podcast
      PO Box 739
      Burlington, KY 41005]]>
      Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 36:52 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-get-good-audio-from-your-podcast-guests-tap304/
      What to Do When You Have Too Many Podcast Episodes in Your RSS Feed – TAP303 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/SpOM6KPmJiY/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/what-to-do-when-you-have-too-many-podcast-episodes-in-your-rss-feed-tap303/#comments Tue, 02 May 2017 13:51:09 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=13062

      When you have more podcast episodes than your RSS feed holds, it can affect your audience, marketing, and more. Here are eight options to fix it.

      1. Learn about episode limits

      Before you get much further in this episode (or in reading these show notes), learn “What You Need to Know about Episode Limits and Your Podcast RSS Feed” from my previous episode:

      1. The episode limit is set by whatever creates your podcast RSS feed
      2. More episodes make your podcast RSS feed bigger and slower
      3. Directory limits don't affect your subscribers
      4. Your old episodes could be irrelevant
      5. Your old episodes could be timeless
      6. Many people will want to binge on your podcast
      7. Every episode contributes to your podcast SEO

      With these things in mind, you can determine which of the following options are best for your podcast and, most important, best for your audience.

      2. Raise the limit

      There is no universal hard limit to how large an RSS feed can be, neither in its file size nor in its number of episodes. There are, however, practical limits, as I discussed in my previous episode, such as the speed and compatibility of large feeds.

      Most podcast-feed-creation tools default to 10, 20, 50, or 100 latest episodes. If you have more episodes than that and you want them to display in podcast apps and be downloadable by your subscribers, then you should raise the limit in what is creating your RSS feed.

      • WordPress default or category feed: WordPress ➜ Settings ➜ Reading ➜ Syndication feeds show the most recent
      • PowerPress feeds: WordPress ➜ PowerPress ➜ Settings (or your feed under Podcast Channels or Category Podcasting) ➜ Feed ➜ Show the most recent
      • Libsyn: Libsyn show ➜ Destinations ➜ Libsyn Classic Feed ➜ Advanced Options ➜ Episode/Post Limit

      Even if a podcast directory limits the number of displayed episodes (such as the Apple catalog's current limit of 300), you can increase your number of episodes beyond that. This will make those older episodes still fully accessible to your subscribers, even if they don't display in podcast catalogs.

      3. Optimize the feed data

      When you raise the limit on your RSS feed, it could add significant data to the feed, which could result in slower performance.

      There are three ways to fix this.

      • Use a highly-optimized, podcast-only RSS feed that contains minimal data (such as a Libsyn feed separate from your website).
      • Use “Feed Episode Maximizer” on your podcast-only RSS feed from PowerPress so it will reduce the amount of data accompanying older episodes.
      • Switch WordPress to publish excerpts instead of the full content in the feed by going to WordPress ➜ Settings ➜ Reading ➜ “For each article in a feed, show” and set to “Summary.”

      4. Remove irrelevant episodes

      Make sure you use a podcast-only RSS feed for podcast apps and directories. Otherwise, including text-only posts in the same feed can cause unnecessary inflation and bump out podcast episodes from item-limited feeds.

      If your feed contains only podcast episodes, you might want to consider cleaning up your archive. Look for any kind of announcement-only episodes—such as for a hiatus, upcoming event, or special circumstances—which are no longer relevant.

      You could even consider filtering your feed to include only your best content. So you could remove:

      • Replaced episodes, such as when you changed your mind or information significantly changed—especially if you're concerned the old content might lead your audience in the wrong direction
      • Overly time-sensitive content (if your whole show isn't covering time-sensitive content)
      • Low-quality episodes

      But I actually caution against this. There are certainly times it may be appropriate. But for most of us, our archive of episodes tell a bigger story that help build our authority and influence.

      5. Sell the back catalog

      If your content is timeless and you limit your feed to only your latest episodes, you may be able to sell access to your older episodes. You could do that through Patreon, MyLibsyn, or a membership system on your site (such as with the MemberPress plugin for WordPress).

      The Adam Carolla Show and Ben Greenfield Fitness are a couple podcasts that do this.

      Although you could sell individual episodes, I think it would be easier for you and your members, as well as foster an ongoing relationship, if you treat it more like membership access. This would allow them to pay a recurring fee to keep access to everything.

      But ensure the members-only feed does contain everything and has no limits! This would allow paying members to subscribe to that feed instead of your public feed, and then they will have access to all your old and new episodes from a single place, as long as they maintain their membership.

      6. Create an archive show

      Although an RSS feed theoretically has no limit to the number of episodes, podcast directories might (Apple currently limits it to 300). Thus, your old episodes may be available to subscribers, but not findable through search.

      If you want your episodes to remain findable in podcast apps beyond those directory limits, then consider creating one or multiple archive shows.

      For example, John Lee Dumas's podcast, Entrepreneur on Fire, is far beyond the 300-episode limit for the Apple podcast directory. His main podcast feed contains all his daily episodes, but only the latest 300 are findable through Apple Podcasts. So John creates and submits separate RSS feeds with 300 episodes in each: 1–300, 301–600, 601–900, and so on. This ensures his old but timeless content is still findable, which is especially important for popular guests or topics.

      John makes these separate feeds by creating additional shows on Libsyn. This gives each show full control over a dedicated RSS feed without having to use FeedBurner. It also provides separate archive stats. But this does cost extra for each new show.

      A big benefit to John's method of completely separate hosting is that he can edit those episodes differently to make each one encourage subscribing to the main feed.

      Thus, the more affordable and easier way to create archive shows is with categories—either in WordPress, Libsyn, or your other feed-creation tool. These categories could be named simply, “Archive 1,” “Archive 2,” and so on. With PowerPress, you can enable Category Podcasting to have full control over each RSS feed. With Libsyn, you would need to run the category feeds through FeedBurner—and yes, use the dreaded SmartCast feature—to have control over the feed data.

      Consider these archive shows a form of passive SEO. You don't have to promote them, but they are there and findable for anyone.

      7. Do nothing

      You could simply do nothing and let your podcast episodes disappear after they're bumped beyond your limits—either by the podcast directories or by your own feed limits.

      This could be totally fine for many podcasts that lack ongoing, timeless value (also known as “long tail”) for older episodes.

      For example, episodes from a current-events podcast are no longer relevant after the current events have past (and possibly been forgotten). This could apply to podcasts that cover news, sports, day-in-history, and such.

      8. Work within your limits

      Limits aren't always a bad thing. So regardless of the timelessness of your episodes, you may decide to do nothing with your feed itself. But when you know your podcast's limits, you can make decisions that help you to podcast better within those limitations.

      For example, working within limits could help you:

      • Know what content is accessible to new subscribers (so don't often recommend episodes that are no longer in the feed)
      • Not have to worry about bandwidth on old episodes (but not a problem if you're using a real podcast host, like Blubrry or Libsyn)
      • Not have older, embarrassing content still accessible to new subscribers
      • Know what might happen if you release too many episodes in a short period of time
      • Set appropriate expectations for sponsors
      • Promote time-sensitive things appropriately

      Thank you for the podcast reviews!

      • Dave.Rex wrote in iTunes USA, “A Free Show With Huge Value. Daniel J. Lewis has given me so much more than just some tips or tricks to podcast. This show has given me the courage, drive, ideas, tools, resources, and education it takes to start my own podcast. Daniel is incredibly devoted to showing YOU how to succeed. This show is a testament to that, I have learned more here in a couple weeks than I did in years on my previous show. If only I had discovered this man sooner I would already be 100 episodes deep. If you want to start your own podcast, start here.”
      • Lee Conway (“Leensarah”), host of Frequent Fear Podcast, wrote in iTunes UK, “A podcast Audio Bible. After taking over the recording & running of a podcast, I was recommended this show. It has become a staple of my commute to work, leaning me so much towards improving both quality and listenership of my podcast. Thanks and here's to many more lessons.”

      Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

      Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

      Announcements

      Need personalized podcasting help?

      I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

      Ask your questions or share your feedback

      Connect with me

      Disclosure

      This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

      ]]>
      https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/what-to-do-when-you-have-too-many-podcast-episodes-in-your-rss-feed-tap303/feed/ 1 When you have more podcast episodes than your RSS feed holds, it can affect your audience, marketing, and more. Here are eight options to fix it.
      1. Learn about episode limits
      2. Raise the limit
      3. Optimize the feed data
      4. Remove irrelevant episodes
      5. Sell the back catalog
      6. Create an archive show
      7. Do nothing
      8. Work within your limits

      Thanks to Lee Conway, host of Frequent Fear Podcast, and Dave.Rex for the 5-star podcast reviews!

      Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

      Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

      Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/303

      FEEDBACK
      Call (903) 231-2221
      Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
      Send a voice message from https://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

      MAILING ADDRESS
      The Audacity to Podcast
      PO Box 739
      Burlington, KY 41005]]>
      Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 30:48 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/what-to-do-when-you-have-too-many-podcast-episodes-in-your-rss-feed-tap303/
      What You Need to Know about Episode Limits and Your Podcast RSS Feed – TAP302 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/IyPmhFeCVbU/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-episode-limits-and-your-podcast-rss-feed-tap302/#comments Tue, 25 Apr 2017 15:15:25 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=13056

      After podcasting for a while and you may see old episodes disappear from podcast directories and your RSS feed. Here are seven things you should know.

      Come back for my next episode where I'll share, “What to Do When You Have Too Many Podcast Episodes in Your RSS Feed.”

      1. The episode limit is set by whatever creates your podcast RSS feed

      WordPress, Libsyn, or whatever else you're using to create your RSS feed is also what sets the limit on how many episodes that feed can hold. If you use FeedBurner, it doesn't affect the episode limit in any way.

      Exactly where you adjust that limit depends on how you're using the tools to create the feed. Here are the three most-common places:

      • WordPress default or category feed: WordPress ➜ Settings ➜ Reading ➜ Syndication feeds show the most recent
      • PowerPress feeds: WordPress ➜ PowerPress ➜ Settings (or your feed under Podcast Channels or Category Podcasting) ➜ Feed ➜ Show the most recent
      • Libsyn: Libsyn show ➜ Destinations ➜ Libsyn Classic Feed ➜ Advanced Options ➜ Episode/Post Limit

      2. More episodes make your podcast RSS feed bigger and slower

      Be careful increasing or removing the episode limit. Every additional episode will proportionally increase the size and decrease the speed of your podcast RSS feed.

      For example, a feed with 200 episodes will be approximately double the size and double the load time of the same feed with 100 episodes.

      There are some exceptions and workarounds to this, which I'll explain in my next episode.

      3. Directory limits don't affect your subscribers

      Apple's podcasts directory currently limits podcast listings to 300 episodes. (There are some rare cases where 301 or just below 300 will display, perhaps due to a bug.) Other podcast directories may have lower limits.

      But thanks to the wonderful, decentralized nature of podcasting, these directory limits don't matter. That's because most people subscribe directly to your podcast RSS feed, so the directory has no affect on what the subscriber has access to. Thus, it's possible for your subscribers to see all of your episodes, almost regardless of what app they use, even if the directory shows fewer.

      There are some “walled garden” apps that don't honor the spirit of podcasting and may limit what the user can access because the app doesn't actually subscribe them to your feed.

      4. Your old episodes could be irrelevant

      While you may be tempted to offer all your podcast episodes in your feed, you should be realistic about their long-term value. This is often referred to as “long tail.”

      A current-events podcast, for example, has little to no value in old episodes after the events have passed. This may be only partially true for fan-based content (TV shows, movies, sports, etc.).

      Thus, increasing your episode limit may not provide any extra value to your audience, because you're only exposing irrelevant content.

      5. Your old episodes could be timeless

      On the other side of irrelevance is timelessness. When your content has long-term value, it has “long tail.” These are the kinds of episodes that are still relevant today. You may often refer back to them, they rank well for common search terms, or they provide content that will always be valuable.

      Here are some examples of timeless content:

      • Comedy
      • Stories
      • Interviews (depending on the focus of the interview)
      • Education
      • Reviews
      • Inspiration

      Fan-based content (TV shows, movies, etc.) is most relevant during the release of the stuff your podcast is about. But there's still some long tail because people may watch the TV show or movie years later and want a podcast to follow with it.

      If your content is truly timeless, then increasing your episode limit exposes more valuable content to your audience.

      6. Many people will want to binge on your podcast

      Easy access to timeless content (via Netflix, podcasts, and more) feeds our present binging culture. Some creators are even publishing entire seasons of content in one big drop instead of slowly over time.

      Even if you publish episode over time, it doesn't take long to build a back-catalog of content. If someone enters your podcast through high-quality, relevant, engaging content, it's likely they'll go back to consume older episodes. They may even do this in a very short amount of time (thus binging).

      The more episodes you offer to subscribers, the deeper someone can get engaged with your content. And the deeper they get engaged, the more loyal they become.

      7. Every episode contributes to your podcast SEO

      Lastly, your podcast's findability (or search-engine optimization (SEO)) within podcast apps and directories is often greatly affected by the episodes in your feed.

      Apple's podcasts catalog, for example, searches not only show-level information, but also episode-level information. Thus, you could be found for a search based solely on a single episode when your show-level information doesn't contain any of that content.

      The more episodes with good titles you have in your feed, the more opportunities you have to be found for various terms, or to rank better for specific terms.

      Thank you for the podcast reviews!

      • Lenny Jennison (AKA “Wendellfish”), host of Victim's Voice, wrote in iTunes USA, “Must listen! This is all the information you have ever pestered other podcasts hosts for…without any luck!! This podcast covers EVERYTHING you have ever wanted to know about setting up your pod, from website to how to appropriately provide worth to listeners BEFORE asking for money!”
      • Eli Persinger wrote in iTunes USA, “Detailed and Delightful! Daniel's The Audacity to Podcast is THE place to go on a ‘listening tour' as you prepare to launch your own podcast. Heck, if you've already been at it awhile, you should STILL listen because this guy has THOUGHT THINGS THROUGH. Whether talking about SEO, show notes, equipment or URLs, the advice here is SOLID and DETAILED. What a find!”

      Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

      Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

      Announcements

      • Come back the next episode to what you can do when you have too many episodes in your feed!

      Need personalized podcasting help?

      I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

      Ask your questions or share your feedback

      Connect with me

      Disclosure

      This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

      ]]>
      https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-episode-limits-and-your-podcast-rss-feed-tap302/feed/ 3 After podcasting for a while and you may see old episodes disappear from podcast directories and your RSS feed. Here are seven things you should know.
      Come back for my next episode where I'll share, "What to Do When You Have Too Many Podcast Episodes in Your RSS Feed."

      1. The episode limit is set by whatever creates your podcast RSS feed
      2. More episodes make your podcast RSS feed bigger and slower
      3. Directory limits don't affect your subscribers
      4. Your old episodes could be irrelevant
      5. Your old episodes could be timeless
      6. Many people will want to binge on your podcast
      7. Every episode contributes to your podcast SEO

      Thanks to Wendellfish and Eli Persinger for the 5-star podcast reviews!

      Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

      Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

      Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/302

      FEEDBACK
      Call (903) 231-2221
      Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
      Send a voice message from https://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

      MAILING ADDRESS
      The Audacity to Podcast
      PO Box 739
      Burlington, KY 41005]]>
      Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 25:21 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/what-you-need-to-know-about-episode-limits-and-your-podcast-rss-feed-tap302/
      A Life Changed and Saved through Podcasting – TAP301 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/C2odxIXE5ho/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/a-life-changed-and-saved-through-podcasting-tap301/#respond Tue, 18 Apr 2017 12:00:43 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=13006

      I believe anyone can share a message to change the world, and podcasting is the best way to spread that message. This is the story of how God used podcasts and podcasting to radically change my own world and even save my life.

      I hope this inspires you to realize how podcasting can not only change your own life, but also positively impact the lives of others.

      Instead of thorough show notes, I'll instead share photos from different points in my story. It's only taking a while to find and copy the photos from old CD-R archives!

      Podcast Awards (2013)

      Need personalized podcasting help?

      I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

      Ask your questions or share your feedback

      Connect with me

      Disclosure

      This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

      ]]>
      https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/a-life-changed-and-saved-through-podcasting-tap301/feed/ 0 I believe anyone can share a message to change the world, and podcasting is the best way to spread that message. This is the story of how God used podcasts and podcasting to radically change my own world and even save my life.
      Visit the show notes to see some photos from different points in my story! https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/301

      Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

      Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

      FEEDBACK
      Call (903) 231-2221
      Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
      Send a voice message from https://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

      MAILING ADDRESS
      The Audacity to Podcast
      PO Box 739
      Burlington, KY 41005]]>
      Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 3:33:44 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/a-life-changed-and-saved-through-podcasting-tap301/
      Preparing for and Learning from Your First Podcast Episode – TAP300 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/BeIemieynu4/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/preparing-for-and-learning-from-your-first-podcast-episode-tap300/#respond Tue, 04 Apr 2017 16:59:59 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=12973

      To celebrate 300 episodes of The Audacity to Podcast, I'm drawing lessons from this show's first episode to help you launch your podcast better, or learn how you can improve.

      I published the first episode of The Audacity to Podcast, “You Need Passion, Organization, and Dialog (POD) to Podcast,” on June 17, 2010. It's launch coincided with the launch of Noodle Mix Network.

      1. Serve your audience

      In my first episode, I spent too much time talking about what a podcast is. (Even as far back as 2010, I addressed the debate over the word “podcast”!) But my target audience was existing and want-to-be podcasters, so it's reasonable to assume they know what a podcast is.

      First, why are you podcasting? If serving others isn't part of that answer, then you may need to re-evaluate your reasons for podcasting.

      Second, whom are you podcasting to? What do they actually need? Understand and get to know your audience by asking them questions.

      Third, what expectations are you setting up for your podcast? A lot of people came to The Audacity to Podcast looking for information on the Audacity software, which I didn't directly discuss until several episodes in (a point Dave Jackson even made when he first discovered my podcast). Deliver what people came for, and they'll often stay for more.

      2. Respect your audience's time

      I cringed when I discovered that my first episode of The Audacity to Podcast started with an ad! It was an ad for my own (now retired) graphic and web design business.

      I also spent too much time talking about myself and talking about the podcast instead of simply giving the podcast.

      In fact, that first episode took nearly three minutes to get into the actual content!

      While some people may not mind much if you waste a little of their time, I'm confident no one will hate you for respecting their time.

      Don't worry about making your episodes an “ideal length.” Make every minute count, and your audience will most likely not care how many minutes you give them.

      3. Plan your show's future

      Before I started The Audacity to Podcast, I made a list of 35 topics I wanted to cover. That simple plan gave me direction for the future and that approach continues to help me consistently create new content.

      Whether you're launching your podcast or you've been podcasting for a while, try brainstorming a list of future topics: themes, guests, stories, reviews, and more.

      The first iTunes review I ever received was from Erik Fisher (now a great friend and the host of Beyond the To-Do List, which is on my network) and it demonstrates the perceived value in having and following a plan:

      Let me be the first to say that this show will be around a while. I say that not just because Daniel has it planned out, but because even after just two episodes, it's that good. This show will empower you to podcast through information and motivation. Great job!

      4. Prepare your content and presentation

      I don't remember exactly how long I spent preparing my first episode, but I have a feeling it was only as long as it took to come up with “POD: passion, organization, and dialogue.” I probably spent no time preparing how I would communicate that message.

      The better you prepare, the fewer mistakes you'll make (and thus fewer things you may want to edit out).

      5. Be yourself

      When I started The Audacity to Podcast, I was still finding my voice. I was not necessarily trying to be anyone else in particular, but I was trying to be “bigger than life” in a way that didn't actually fit my own life. I could hear in my voice how I was trying to sound like a radio DJ or voiceover artist.

      Masking or inflating your personality takes extra energy and can wear off, but the real you is the most natural person you can be. It's okay to amplify yourself a little, as that may communicate better when your audience isn't one-on-one, face-to-face, and in person with you. But remember to amplify yourself, not something else.

      6. Stay focused

      Wow, was I distracted in that first episode! I was trying to explain the podcast, trying to demonstrate my expertise, and trying to engage with a live chat audience. Because of that, I got distracted many times by being interrupted by the chat room or by stumbling over how I said something.

      As much as possible, focus on the message you want to share and whom you want to share it with.

      I also recommend focusing on building only one podcast at a time. In my first episode, I teased the idea of starting a podcast in a void that had been left open. Instead of starting that podcast, I focused on The Audacity to Podcast and it paid off!

      7. Don't obsess

      The audio quality of my first episode wasn't great. It sounds even worse, now, because I someday went back and re-processed the audio. There was noticeable background noise from my computer, horribly amplified breath noises, and an annoyingly gate that made the background noise more noticeable by “punching” it in and out.

      That first episode also launched alongside the extremely underdeveloped Noodle Mix Network.

      Sure, those things probably mattered and might have turned away a few people back then. But those were short-term problems that don't affect me anymore.

      Today, the #1 obsession for new podcasters seems to be with their “massive launch”: reviews, iTunes New & Noteworthy, ranking, episodes in the can, and launch partners. When I started, I had zero reviews, but I was featured on the front page of iTunes. That was fun and inspirational, but the real work in growing my audience started weeks later when the New & Noteworthy spike dropped off.

      Regardless of where you are in your podcasting journey, I think obsession is unhealthy. If anything, you could obsess over delivering value to your audience, and you'll be respected for that. But that may come at the cost of a personal connection with your audience (as I often struggle with).

      8. Don't give up

      Not everyone loved me or The Audacity to Podcast when I started. It especially seemed like listeners from Australia and New Zealand disliked me, as demonstrated in this 3-star review from “Aussie-Jack.” This was only my second review and my first international review:

      Tends to waffel on a bit, but generally not bad. Second to the PodcastAnswerMan (Cliff has been doing it for awhile, now). If Daniel has the long-term passion, he will only get better. Go Daniel! -Congratulations

      Yes, I have the long-term passion and I know my show has gotten better.

      Wherever you are in podcasting, don't give up if you're not yet where you want to be. Reach out to experts, join my Podcasters' Society, or do whatever it takes to keep growing and improving. You will see returns when you invest with smart work!

      BONUS: Emily Prokop's review

      When I first announced what I would be doing to celebrate my 300th episode, Emily Prokop responded with such value, I could not merely quote from it. So listen to Emily's full ten minutes and check out her great podcast, The Story Behind.

      (Emily referenced my article, “There Is No #1 in iTunes Podcasts ‘New and Noteworthy.'”)

      Thank you for the podcast reviews!

        Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

        Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

        Announcements

        • April 2, 2017 was my tenth anniversary in podcasting! To celebrate, my next episode will feature my wife (and a little bit of Noodle Baby) interviewing me and helping to tell my full story (even with the ugly details) of podcasting and my business. It will even include how podcasting helped me through what I call “the year of hell” when I felt like everything in my life was killed or dying. Watch for that in episode 301!

        Need personalized podcasting help?

        I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

        Ask your questions or share your feedback

        Connect with me

        Disclosure

        This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

        ]]>
        https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/preparing-for-and-learning-from-your-first-podcast-episode-tap300/feed/ 0 To celebrate 300 episodes of The Audacity to Podcast, I'm drawing lessons from this show's first episode to help you launch your podcast better, or learn how you can improve.
        1. Serve your audience
        2. Respect your audience's time
        3. Plan your show's future
        4. Prepare your content and presentation
        5. Be yourself
        6. Stay focused
        7. Don't obsess
        8. Don't give up

        Thanks to Emily Prokop, host of The Story Behind, for the bonus content! Listen to her podcast at http://thestorybehindpodcast.com

        Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

        Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

        Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/300

        FEEDBACK
        Call (903) 231-2221
        Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
        Send a voice message from https://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

        MAILING ADDRESS
        The Audacity to Podcast
        PO Box 739
        Burlington, KY 41005]]>
        Daniel J. Lewis, with Emily Prokop clean 50:28 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/preparing-for-and-learning-from-your-first-podcast-episode-tap300/
        8 Ways to Use People for Automation in Podcasting – TAP299 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/V-R2k2qylxA/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/8-ways-to-use-people-for-automation-in-podcasting-tap299/#respond Tue, 21 Mar 2017 16:06:59 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=12891

        People can be wonderful parts of your podcasting team by relieving some of your burdens. I include people as an “automation tool” because they can be so skilled that all you need to do is assign a task and they return amazing results. So please never underestimate the value of others!

        Here are the most powerful roles you can assign for podcasting “automation” with people.

        The premise of “automation” (versus automatic actions)

        Many tools can do things automatically. But all of the following tools are focused on automation, that is, automatically doing many things for you and not only a single task.

        Automation may have a learning curve, but the ultimate result will make up for it!

        Contributing content

        Your podcast content doesn't have to be created solely by yourself. You could “outsource” work to other contributors in the form of cohosts, guests, audience feedback, and audience submissions (such as research, production pieces, content, and more).

        Editing audio or video

        Podcast-editing is usually one of—if not the—most-hated tasks for podcasters. But some people love editing (God bless those superheroes)!

        Delegating audio or video editing to someone else could be the biggest stress relief you'll ever have in podcasting, perhaps even more than getting a cohost!

        Writing

        What's the second most-hated task for podcasters? It's usually writing show notes. But a good writer can help you in many other ways, such as helping with marketing copy, repurposing content, and improving existing content.

        Moderating

        Whether you have an active community or you receive a lot of feedback, a moderator can help filter everything and keep everyone engaged. Usually, the ideal person for this position is already extremely active in your community.

        Designing

        “With great power comes great responsibility” [Spider-Man] could apply to the myriad of design tools now available. It's so easy to create images that anyone can create a disaster of pixels.

        You may not be able to afford an ongoing designer for your regular design needs (website, print, or other images), but I do highly recommend you invest in a professional designer for your most important stuff, like your podcast cover art.

        Consider hiring someone from 99designs, DesignCrowd, or contact me if you need a designer and I can refer you to someone I trust.

        Booking interviews

        Whether you like to have guests on your podcast or you like to be a guest on other podcasts, it can be a huge pain to find, filter, contact, and follow up with every possibility. That's why I highly recommend delegating this to someone else, and they can probably do a much better job!

        I recommend Jessica Rhodes' Interview Connections to help you “rock the podcast from both sides of the mic” (booking guests for your own show and booking you as a guest for other shows). If you want to focus solely on being a guest expert and optimizing your entire marketing plan around that, then I recommend Tom Schwab's Interview Valet.

        Managing your website

        Remember the Spider-Man quotation, “With great power comes great responsibility”? All that power should be handled cautiously regarding your website. You could easily crash your podcast, your site, or even your entire server by running bad code, not updating things, or making some bad choices.

        Whether you need a developer or a designer, I highly recommend that you get someone else to manage the technical stuff for you.

        For a reliable web host, I recommend SiteGround. If you need much more powerful hosting and more management, then I recommend WP Engine.

        Contact me if you need a website expert or developer and I can refer you to someone I trust.

        Marketing

        A marketing department sounds like an option exclusive to multi-million-dollar companies. Not true! You can have your own marketing “department” with only one person who helps promote your stuff.

        This marketing manager can help with social-media content, optimizing your website, improving your email newsletter, and much more.

        If you're trying to aggressively grow your audience or to build your business, a marketing manager will be a great investment!

        Thank you for the podcast reviews!

        • cafewhiskey wrote in iTunes USA, “I've found that most ‘how to' podcasts are not as informative or helpful as this one. Daniel obviously does this to promote his own products at times. But first and foremost are the tips and advice about podcasting. I especially find tips on audience growth and marketing very helpful, which most other podcasts do not cover. To make it even better, Daniel has a way of packaging advice in easy to-the-point tips that are easily accessible.”

        Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

        Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

        Announcements

        • Last chance to help celebrate and contribute to my upcoming 300th episode! Listen to my first episode of The Audacity to Podcast, then send feedback and critiques as if you want to help that podcaster improve.
        • I celebrate my ten years of podcasting on April 2, 2017! I'll bring a special episode to you that will share my full and unfiltered journey with and into podcasting.

        Need personalized podcasting help?

        I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

        Ask your questions or share your feedback

        Connect with me

        Disclosure

        This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

        ]]>
        https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/8-ways-to-use-people-for-automation-in-podcasting-tap299/feed/ 0 People can be wonderful parts of your podcasting team and be so skilled that you simply assign a task and they return amazing results—it's like automation!
        Here are the most powerful roles you can assign for podcasting "automation" with people.

        Contributing content
        Editing audio or video
        Writing
        Moderating
        Designing
        Booking interviews
        Managing your website
        Marketing

        Thanks to cafewhiskey for the 5-star review in iTunes!

        Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

        Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

        Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/299

        FEEDBACK
        Call (903) 231-2221
        Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
        Send a voice message from https://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

        MAILING ADDRESS
        The Audacity to Podcast
        PO Box 739
        Burlington, KY 41005]]>
        Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 31:42 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/8-ways-to-use-people-for-automation-in-podcasting-tap299/
        13 WordPress-Based Automation Tools for Podcasting – TAP298 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/2F10PXorw8Q/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/13-wordpress-based-automation-tools-for-podcasting-tap298/#comments Tue, 14 Mar 2017 16:04:28 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=12886

        WordPress is powerful for running your podcast website and it can be the base for automating your podcasting workflow. Here are 13 WordPress plugins to help!

        The premise of “automation” (versus automatic actions)

        Many tools can do things automatically. But all of the following tools are focused on automation, that is, automatically doing many things for you and not only a single task.

        Automation may have a learning curve, but the ultimate result will make up for it!

        Jetpack Publicize or Social Auto Poster

        Publishing your podcast post isn't the end of your podcasting workflow. It's also critical to share that post onto your own social-network accounts and perhaps other social areas.

        Jetpack offers a free Publicize module, or you can get a lot more control with the paid plugin Social Auto Poster. Both plugins allow you to link social accounts, such as Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, and more (even Buffer), and then your post will be shared out immediately on publish. Social Auto Poster even lets you customize how your messages appear before they're sent, or schedule when the messages will go out.

        Revive Old Post / Revive Old Post Pro or Tweet Wheel / Tweet Wheel Pro

        Like Social Jukebox and Edgar, Revive Old Post and Tweet Wheel will automatically reshare your content from your archive. But this is entirely powered and managed from your WordPress website! It can run on your archive as well as automatically on new content.

        The Pro versions (Revive Old Post Pro and Tweet Wheel Pro) unlock extra features, like custom share messages, sharing with images, more accounts, and much more.

        Browser Shots

        This is my favorite plugin I discovered in my research for this episode. When discussing content from other sites, it's often nice to include an image to represent that site. You could be commenting on a general website or a specific page. Instead of manually messing with browser plugins, PC apps, or other tools to capture, convert, upload, and include the screenshot of the website, Browser Shots will do that all for you and you only have to enter a simple shortcode in your page or post!

        WordPress to Buffer / WordPress to Buffer Pro

        I talked about Buffer in my episode about Internet-based automation tools for podcasting. Buffer allows for easily spreading multiple posts across a schedule as well as crossposting to other networks.

        This plugin can also be used instead of Jetpack Publicize or Social Auto Poster because you can post immediately through Buffer.

        Simple Podcast Press

        I usually talk about Simple Podcast Press as a better podcast player for your WordPress website. It also has great automation built in!

        If your podcast feed is generated by anything other than your own WordPress website, Simple Podcast Press can automatically import all your episodes to your own site and include your episode's player. This works on all past episodes and automatically for all future episodes!

        (Use promo code “noodle” to save 25%!)

        Simple Social Press

        Similar to Simple Podcast Press, Simple Social Press will automatically publish your Facebook Live events to your WordPress site.

        Add Shortcodes Actions and Filters

        I have previously recommended Shortcode Exec PHP and then Shortcodes Pro, but neither WordPress plugin is being developed anymore. Now, I recommend Add Shortcodes Actions and Filters.

        The most powerful use of this is in creating your own shortcodes. For example, [show_notes_close]. That shortcode can automatically insert your podcast's closing text into the WordPress post. That saves a lot of time and ensures consistency.

        This becomes an investment in future automation. If you ever decide you want to change that closing text, you need only change it in the shortcode and it will be automatically changed everywhere you used that shortcode!

        BackupBuddy, UpdraftPlus / UpdraftPlus Premium, BackWPupBackWPup Pro

        Backing up your WordPress website is extremely important. Your web-hosting provider may offer daily backups, and I think you should also keep your own. These are useful for rolling back updates, reverting to before you made breaking changes, and protecting your content in case your site is ever infected.

        Each of these backup plugins have manually triggered options, and automatic backups are often limited to the paid plugins.

        Of these popular backup plugins, I use and recommend BackupBuddy because it's easy, automatic, well-supported, and can send my backups off site to a variety of destinations (Amazon S3, Dropbox, email, FTP, etc.).

        Pretty Link Pro

        One of my all-time favorite plugins for WordPress, Pretty Link Pro, recently released its long-awaited new version. Now, Pretty Link Pro incorporates many of my suggestions and includes some great automation features.

        You're probably already familiar with these simple automated tasks Pretty Link Pro can do:

        • Automatically hyperlink keywords with your pretty links in pages, posts, comments, and feeds
        • Drastically simplify the process of making a pretty link for your pages and posts

        Pretty Link Pro 2.0 added a few great new tools for automations

        • Geolocation-based redirects—Instead of making separate redirects for each country, make a single one go different places depending on where the user is.
        • Technology-based redirects—A single link can redirect to a different destination based on the browser, device, or operating system of the user.
        • Time-based redirects—A single link can be scheduled to point different places (or expire) based a schedule!

        Thank you for the podcast reviews!

        • Ricky, host of Daily Devotional, wrote in iTunes-USA, “Inspiring and Practical. Love this podcast. I've been thinking about starting a podcast with Daily Devotionals for years and your show finally led me to pull the trigger. I'm about 60 episodes in [now more than 140!] and just enjoying every second. It's called Daily Devotional and seems to be going well. Thanks so much!!”

        Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

        Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

        Announcements

        Need personalized podcasting help?

        I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

        Ask your questions or share your feedback

        Connect with me

        Disclosure

        This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

        ]]>
        https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/13-wordpress-based-automation-tools-for-podcasting-tap298/feed/ 2 WordPress is powerful for running your podcast website and it can be the base for automating your podcasting workflow. Here are 13 WordPress plugins to help your podcast automation!
        - Jetpack Publicize or Social Auto Poster
        - Revive Old Post / Revive Old Post Pro or Tweet Wheel / Tweet Wheel Pro
        - Browser Shots
        - WordPress to Buffer / WordPress to Buffer Pro
        - Simple Podcast Press
        - Simple Social Press
        - Add Shortcodes Actions and Filters
        - BackupBuddy, UpdraftPlus / UpdraftPlus Premium, BackWPup / BackWPup Pro
        - Pretty Link Pro

        Thanks to Ricky from http://dailydevotionalpodcast.com for the 5-star review in iTunes!

        Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

        Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

        Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/298

        FEEDBACK
        Call (903) 231-2221
        Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
        Send a voice message from https://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

        MAILING ADDRESS
        The Audacity to Podcast
        PO Box 739
        Burlington, KY 41005]]>
        Daniel J. Lewis, featuring Jetpack Publicize, Social Auto Poster, Revive Old Post Pro, Tweet Wheel Pro, Browser Shots, WordPress to Buffer Pro, Simple Podcast Press, Simple Social Press, Add Shortcodes Actions and Filters, BackupBuddy, UpdraftPlus Premium, BackWPup Pro, and Pretty Link Pro clean 32:52 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/13-wordpress-based-automation-tools-for-podcasting-tap298/
        24 Internet-Based Automation Tools for Podcasting – TAP297 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/SvxiB2hPKVk/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/24-internet-based-automation-tools-for-podcasting-tap297/#comments Tue, 07 Mar 2017 16:34:53 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=12884

        Web services can automate parts of your podcasting workflow, even when you're not online! Here are my favorite web-based automation tools.

        The premise of “automation” (versus automatic actions)

        Many tools can do things automatically. But all of the following tools are focused on automation, that is, automatically doing many things for you and not only a single task.

        Automation may have a learning curve, but the ultimate result will make up for it!

        Zapier or IFTTT

        No conversation about automation is complete without mentioning either Zapier or IFTTT (If This Then That). Both services will monitor a myriad of sources and trigger actions based on customizable criteria.

        IFTTT is free, fairly simple, and limited to a single action.

        Zapier is a paid service and offers more powerful automations and multiple actions.

        Here are some examples of things you could automate with either tool:

        • Automatically send a text message whenever someone buys something from your online store.
        • Automatically crosspost content from one platform to another.
        • Receive data from other services and automatically reformat and route it somewhere else.
        • Automatically do almost anything you want with your latest podcast reviews (via a paid My Podcast Reviews account).

        Email service providers

        Building an email list for your podcast is helpful for many things: engagement, marketing, education, and much more (episode 198). These automations could be a series of emails or other processes based on subscriber activity.

        For example:

        • Write a series of emails to automatically send every week for a year. Then, every new subscriber starts at the beginning and never misses the same great content everyone else gets.
        • Automatically send an email to a subscriber based on their activity on your site (or lack thereof). This can get them more engaged or connect them with other stuff they wanted.
        • Automatically segment your subscribers based on almost any criteria. With that, you can ensure only the right people receive the right messages.
        • Automatically deliver special offers or resources you give away.

        Here are my favorite email service providers, and what I would recommend them for.

        1. ActiveCampaign: This is my new favorite email service provider! ActiveCampaign makes powerful automations easy. Plus, it has website activity-tracker unmatched by anyone else! I haven't found anything other platforms do that ActiveCampaign can't do better.
        2. ConvertKit: This is the cool new kid on the block. ConvertKit simplifies automations with a single list.
        3. Aweber: This may be the industry-standard tool for email newsletters and autoresponders. Their reputation and delivery is high, and they provide fantastic support.
        4. MailChimp: Get started for free with an email list up to 2,000 subscribers or 12,000 emails a month. I think MailChimp is the easiest-to-use provider and offers simple automation options (though it seems more is coming).

        Wavve

        I don't think podcast audio has a “viral” problem, but there are times you may want to share a snippet of great value from your podcast. Putting this in video makes it available to and stand out more on visual platforms, like Facebook, YouTube, Pinterest, and Instagram.

        Wavve automates this process by allowing you to create a template for your videos, and then uploading your audio clip to be processed and applied to the template. You can even have multiple templates, ideal for different platforms (such as square video for Instagram)!

        My Podcast Reviews

        Podcast reviews don't affect your iTunes ranking, but they can be a great way to build your reputation and engage your audience (episode 263)! The problem is that there are 155 different iTunes stores for 155 different countries. Each store has its own reviews for your podcast. Checking all of these would take a long time.

        Even when you find reviews in iTunes, you can't share them, you can't copy them, you can't sort them much, you can't filter them, and you can't integrate them with any other tool.

        But My Podcast Reviews can help you with all that!

        • Automatically find and collect all your podcast reviews from all iTunes stores and other podcast directories.
        • Automatically email your new reviews on the day you record so you have them for your next episode.
        • Integrate with Zapier, IFTTT, and other apps for automatic display, sharing, and more.
        • Sort and filter all your reviews so you can see exactly what you want.
        • Share individual reviews that also contain subscription links to help you build your audience.

        Social Jukebox or Edgar

        I rarely recommend automating content on social networks, but automating a schedule (especially a recurring schedule) can be a great way to save you time and better engage with your followers!

        Social Jukebox is a bit more affordable and has a better system for scheduling recurring messages, and Edgar is a bit easier to use with a simpler interface and RSS-based queue.

        Here are some examples of queue-based social automations you can do with either Social Jukebox or Edgar on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and someday more:

        • Automatically post leading up to, and during regularly scheduled events, such as a live-stream.
        • Automatically reshare old but timeless content, such as blog posts, podcast episodes, and guest appearances
        • Automatically start conversations by engaging your community with questions.
        • Automatically and regularly promote monetized content.

        I urge you to custom-write your messages, so they're personal. Also, I recommend you set your schedule to no more than once per hour, but less frequently if you don't have a lot of content to share.

        Buffer or Hootsuite

        Whereas Social Jukebox and Edgar can spread out recurring sharing of timeless content, Buffer and Hootsuite are nice ways to automatically share, crosspost, and spread out sharing of new content.

        Buffer and Hootsuite works on the idea of a one-time queue. You can load it up and the messages will post on your schedule, but they won't repeat unless you requeue them.

        They're also handy for simply crossposting the same message on multiple accounts right at the moment.

        Libsyn's OnPublish, Blubrry's Post to Social, or Repurpose

        Speaking of crossposting, there are several tools that can do this as soon as you publish your own content.

        Libsyn's OnPublish feature uses their feed to automatically crosspost your latest podcast episodes across many social and content platforms.

        Blubrry's Post to Social feature can do the same thing from the PowerPress feed for Blubrry hosting customers. Blubrry's option can even truncate the audio and automatically add a trailer, such as saying, “To hear the rest of this episode, listen and subscribe at MyAwesomePodcast.com!”

        Repurpose is a standalone service that, as its name suggests, repurposes your audio or video content from nearly any source (even Facebook Live!) and automatically reposts to other destinations.

        Auphonic

        I talked about the Auphonic desktop app in my episode about Windows- and macOS-based automation tools. This time, I want you to look at the Auphonic web service.

        Clear, consistent, and understandable audio is crucial for all podcasts (audio or video). Auphonic can automate the processing and more! Here's an example workflow Auphonic could do:

        1. Reduce background noise and hum
        2. Reduce reverb
        3. Even out volume differences
        4. Raise or lower perceived loudness to a target industry level
        5. Add an intro and outro
        6. Create a transcript
        7. Mixdown to mono
        8. Encode to MP3
        9. Upload to your media host

        Auphonic is available with a limited free plan and premium plans for larger limits.

        Quuu

        Quuu automatically shares your content with other influencers in your space. It's also a great way to find relevant content you can automatically share on your own social accounts.

        Relay

        Created by my friend and fellow podcaster Craig Carpenter, Relay dramatically speeds up the creation of professional-looking, branded images for your blog or podcast. You can create a template, enter your text, and then Relay will automatically create the multiple sizes ideal for different social networks.

        Designfeed

        Designfeed is somewhat similar to Relay, but it automates the process of finding relevant images based on the text you insert.

        Appointlet, Doodle, Calendly, or ScheduleOnce (and many more)

        If you need to schedule anything with someone else, you probably know the frustration of finding a time that works for you. Even when you pick the right time, it takes extra work to remind and follow up.

        That's where an online scheduling tool helps! Appointlet, Doodle, Calendly, and ScheduleOnce each have their unique features and they're all focused on making it easier to schedule time with someone else. Plus, they offer different types of automations, simplifying the process of reminders, followups, integrations with other tools, and more.

        Google Alerts

        It can be tough to stay on top of your industry, but Google Alerts makes that easy by finding and sending you relevant stuff from across the Web. This can be with simple keywords or advanced search queries (like excluding certain things).

        Announcements

        Need personalized podcasting help?

        I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

        Ask your questions or share your feedback

        Connect with me

        Disclosure

        This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

        ]]>
        https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/24-internet-based-automation-tools-for-podcasting-tap297/feed/ 8 Web services can automate parts of your podcasting workflow, even when you're not online! Here are my favorite web-based automation tools.
        - Zapier or IFTTT
        - Email service providers
        - Wavve
        - My Podcast Reviews
        - Social Jukebox or Edgar
        - Buffer or Hootsuite
        - Libsyn's OnPublish, Blubrry's Post to Social, or Repurpose
        - Auphonic
        - Quuu
        - Relay
        - Designfeed
        - Appointlet, Doodle, Calendly, or ScheduleOnce (and many more)
        - Google Alerts

        Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

        Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

        Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/297

        FEEDBACK
        Call (903) 231-2221
        Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
        Send a voice message from https://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

        MAILING ADDRESS
        The Audacity to Podcast
        PO Box 739
        Burlington, KY 41005]]>
        Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 33:43 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/24-internet-based-automation-tools-for-podcasting-tap297/
        9 Windows- and macOS-Based Automation Tools for Podcasting – TAP296 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/qGLzb9q_4qk/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/9-windows-and-macos-based-automation-tools-for-podcasting-tap296/#comments Tue, 28 Feb 2017 17:30:24 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=12868

        PCs (Windows or macOS) are powerful podcasting tools and ideal for automation. Here are 9 tools for automating many computer-based podcasting workflows.

        Please comment below with the best Linux alternatives!

        The premise of “automation” (versus automatic actions)

        Many tools can do things automatically. But all of the following tools are focused on automation, that is, automatically doing many things for you and not only a single task.

        You've probably heard the phrase, “time is money.” Although that seems more applicable and measurable in business, think of time as if it's money. When you spend it on one thing, it means you don't have as much to spend on another thing.

        The purpose of automation is to save you time and money! Yes, many of these automation tools cost (although many are free or have free options), but they will all save you time so that you have more time for the more important things. These automations could even help you make more money!

        Think about it like this. You could save some money by learning how to hand-code your own RSS feed, but that costs a bunch of time. Instead, you invest a little money into powerful tools (like WordPress, PowerPress, Libsyn, and many others) to save you time, frustration, and prevent you from having to learn stuff you don't want.

        Automation may have a learning curve, but the ultimate result will make up for it!

        Hazel or Hygeia

        Hazel (for macOS) and Hygeia (for Windows) automate tasks on files and folders. Here are some automation examples:

        • Automatically move your recordings from your SD card into a new episode folder and prepare for editing.
        • Automatically upload an ID3-tagged MP3 to your media host.
        • Automatically copy your image template files into new episode folders.
        • Automatically rename and move anything dropped into a particular folder.
        • Automatically process files or folders with AppleScript or other apps when they match a criteria.

        Thanks to Dr. Ryan Gray, from Medical School HQ, for showing me some Hazel workflows, and even inspiring this whole episode!

        TextExpander or PhraseExpress

        Text-expansion was one of the first PC productivity hacks I ever learned, and it's part of what convinced me to switch to Mac.

        But tools like TextExpander (macOS and Windows) and PhraseExpress (Windows) aren't only about text-expansion shortcuts. They can also help with automation! For example:

        • Insert an automatically shortened URL.
        • Turn a regular link into an affiliate link.
        • Automatically populate fields with processed data (such as pulling an image URL from a page when you have only the URL).
        • Run other tasks and programs.

        Both TextExpander and PhraseExpress offer nearly limitless possibilities with powerful scripting options.

        Auphonic

        Clear, consistent, and understandable audio is crucial for all podcasts (audio or video). Auphonic can automate the processing and more! Here's an example Workflow Auphonic could do in a single step:

        1. Reduce background noise and hum
        2. Reduce reverb
        3. Even out volume differences
        4. Raise or lower perceived loudness to a target industry level
        5. Add an intro and outro
        6. Mixdown to mono
        7. Encode to MP3

        Auphonic is available as either a desktop app (macOS and Windows) or as a web service.

        Quadro (formerly called Actions)

        If you have an unused iPad, iPhone, or iPod Touch, Quadro can turn it into a customizable action pad. This can trigger tasks on your PC, such as executing a command or launching a program. And it can also run an entire workflow of tasks with a single button!

        For example, a single button in the Quadro app on your mobile device could launch and prepare nearly all the apps and files you need open for a particular stage in your podcasting process.

        Automator or AutoHotkey

        For more advanced automation, macOS comes with the free program Automator, and Windows users can install the free program AutoHotKey. These can make custom automations (sometimes called “macros”) to run tasks in a variety of programs, or give easy access to developer-level tools built into many apps.

        AutoHotkey can even rerun mouse actions on your screen, so it can click all the right buttons for you!

        BackBlaze

        Since your PC is probably the home for most (if not all) your irreplaceable digital data, keeping it backed up should be your top safety priority!

        I recommend BackBlaze because it automatically backs up everything important on your computer. You don't have to add folders or drives. It simply grabs it all, even your external storage!

        Thank you for the podcast reviews!

        • Teawaterbay wrote in iTunes USA, “Up-to-Date and Enthusiastically Thorough. Daniel is a podcasting pioneer who continues to stay fresh and current on all things in the podosphere. I have listened over the last several years to many podcasters on podcasting and I find The Audacity to Podcast to be one source that I tap into more than most. Many roundtables and discussions reference what Daniel has said or is saying on issues and developments. The field is fortunate to have such a devoted, smart, and generous contributor making this podcast proposition so inviting—and thanks to him and others—accessible to more podcasters. His work has significantly contributed to my recent start-up of my own podcast. Yes, I accumulated the needed audacity—and content—to do it. Thanks, Daniel.”

        Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

        Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

        Announcements

        Need personalized podcasting help?

        I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

        Ask your questions or share your feedback

        Connect with me

        Disclosure

        This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

        ]]>
        https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/9-windows-and-macos-based-automation-tools-for-podcasting-tap296/feed/ 2 PCs (Windows or macOS) are powerful podcasting tools and ideal for automation. Here are 9 tools for automating many computer-based podcasting workflows.
        - Hazel or Hygeia
        - TextExpander or PhraseExpress
        - Auphonic
        - Quadro (formerly called Actions)
        - Automator or AutoHotkey
        - BackBlaze

        Thanks to "Teawaterbay" for the 5-star review in iTunes!

        Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

        Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

        Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/296

        FEEDBACK
        Call (903) 231-2221
        Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
        Send a voice message from https://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

        MAILING ADDRESS
        The Audacity to Podcast
        PO Box 739
        Burlington, KY 41005]]>
        Daniel J. Lewis, featuring Hazel, Hygeia, TextExpander, PhraseExpress, Auphonic, Quadro, Automator, AutoHotkey, and BackBlaze clean 28:28 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/9-windows-and-macos-based-automation-tools-for-podcasting-tap296/
        4 Steps to Critique Your Own Podcast – TAP295 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/ctK5pCnJtwY/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/4-steps-to-critique-your-own-podcast-tap295/#comments Tue, 21 Feb 2017 16:46:35 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=12850

        Regularly evaluating and critiquing your own your podcast, especially from your audience's perspective, will help you improve and grow the podcast. Here are four steps to get you started.

        1. Save your podcast for later

        It's important to add some distance between yourself and the podcast episode you want to evaluate. The longer you wait, the more you will have changed and the more likely you'll be to no longer have the information fresh on your mind. Thus, when you consume the podcast later, your perspective can be fresh enough that you have no context for the content.

        With no context, you can then see how well your podcast stands alone.

        2. Consume your podcast like your audience does

        To help put you in the place of your audience, consider the classic five W's and one H: who, what, when, where, how, and why.

        • Who is consuming your podcast? Are they working guys in their 20s? Are they stay at home moms? Are they seniors with limited technology?
        • What other podcasts might your audience be comparing yours to? What would compel them to listen to your podcast over others?
        • When is your audience consuming your podcast? Do they consume before you publish your next episode? Do they consume during the week, or on a weekend?
        • Where is your audience consuming your podcast? Driving? Working? Relaxing? Are there distractions?
        • How is your audience consuming your podcast? Headphones? High-speed? On a computer, or on a mobile device?
        • Why is your audience consuming your podcast? What profit is in it for them?

        You may be able to get this exact information by surveying your audience, or you may have to assume some things.

        Listen to “8 ways people consume podcasts and how to make a better experience” to gain some more perspective.

        The word “avatar” is often used in conversations about your audience. What most people mean when they say, “your avatar” is actually “your audience's avatar.” Because you want a representation of your audience (their avatar) and not a representation of yourself (your avatar).

        3. Critique your podcast as if it is someone else's

        It's often said that we are our own worst critics, but I think our pride often makes us too gentle on ourselves.

        If you have ever received negative criticism, it can inspire a useful perspective for critiquing your own podcast. For example, if someone says that your information isn't helpful, imagine you don't know anything about the subject, and then try to learn about it from yourself.

        In a way, a critical perspective is similar to how you listen and look for things to edit. But critiquing is broader. Instead of merely looking at the small details, look at the overall message. For example, instead of counting your ums, listen for how easy it is to follow and understand the idea being shared. Or consider how much you talk about yourself instead of providing value to others.

        Something may even help get you in the right perspective is if you listen to an episode of a podcast that annoys you—even if it's a different niche. This irritation can fuel extra negativity, so make sure you use it to critique yourself and not attack others!

        4. Check the tech

        Podcasting is a combination of all kinds of technology. There's a lot that could go wrong, so it's easy to imagine how many people can be overwhelmed (and thus make poor decisions).

        Check the different, audience-affecting pieces of your technology. Here are some examples:

        • Volume levels: Within a single episode, across episodes, and compared to other podcasts
        • Sound quality: Is it easy to hear and understand what's being said?
        • Compatibility: Does your podcast work in different players and apps? Does your website work well on mobile devices?
        • Call-to-action processes: If you ask your audience to do something, do it yourself first, and maybe even on someone else's device. This will ensure everything works, that you're giving accurate instructions, and maybe inspire ways to simplify.

        Thank you for the podcast reviews!

        • From the UK, “Jonahtron” said, “INCREDIBLE resource! If ONLY I'd found this podcast 6 months ago. I've just started podcasting a short time ago. I feel as though I have made every mistake there there is to make along the way, inadvertently going against some of the sensible and good advice that Daniel has shared in this series. BUT I'm a convert now. … I'm not sure I'll ever need the amount of detail he offers with his paid content, but it's a testament to the guy that he puts out so much free content. …” Click here to read the full review.

        Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

        Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

        Announcements

        Need personalized podcasting help?

        I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

        Ask your questions or share your feedback

        Connect with me

        Disclosure

        This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

        ]]>
        https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/4-steps-to-critique-your-own-podcast-tap295/feed/ 1 Regularly evaluating and critiquing your own your podcast, especially from your audience's perspective, will help you improve and grow the podcast. Here are four steps to get you started.
        1. Save your podcast for later
        2. Consume your podcast like your audience does
        3. Critique your podcast as if it is someone else's
        4. Check the tech

        Thanks to "Jonahtron" for the 5-star review in iTunes!

        Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

        Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

        Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/295

        FEEDBACK
        Call (903) 231-2221
        Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
        Send a voice message from https://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

        MAILING ADDRESS
        The Audacity to Podcast
        PO Box 739
        Burlington, KY 41005]]>
        Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 34:24 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/4-steps-to-critique-your-own-podcast-tap295/
        How to Continue Podcasting When Your Life Is Unpredictable – TAP294 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/o5oINSjJ3vk/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-continue-podcasting-when-your-life-is-unpredictable-tap294/#comments Tue, 14 Feb 2017 16:35:02 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=12833

        Life can get crazy and unpredictable. It can be joyous moments like a birth or marriage. It can be sad moments like a death or job loss. It can be trying moments like a move or transition of any kind. Here are 10 tips for keeping your podcast going, despite life's challenges.

        As an extra resource, check out my webinar, “How to Prepare Your Podcast for Breaks,” inside Podcasters' Society.

        1. Make life your highest priority

        Whatever is making your life unpredictable is probably more important than your podcast. It's far better to invest yourself in your life and relationships. Like the instruction on airlines to put on your oxygen mask before helping others, you may not be able to help others through your podcast if you're suffocating your life.

        2. Reduce your expectations

        Is it truly reasonable to think you can keep up your podcast during an unpredictable season of life? You may have had a great schedule for consistency, and I think we all know how important consistency is. But when life is crazy, you may have to drop your expectations altogether.

        3. Be open with your audience

        Podcasting is already a more intimate form of media, so it's okay to be open with your audience. You don't have to share all the dirty details. But if you open up to let your audience know something's going on, they will usually be amazingly supportive!

        From February, 2016 to February 2017, I published ten fewer episodes than usual. During that year, I took three breaks—a sabbatical, an emergency break for a death in my extended family, and time off for the birth of my first child. Never did anyone criticize me for those decisions. You and the rest of my audience were amazingly supportive! (THANK YOU!)

        What you express is what you attract (one of my most-tweeted quotations). So when you're human with your audience, they'll be human back.

        4. Discard old plans and make new ones (with flexibility)

        Before your life changed, you may have had your schedule all planned out. You knew you could podcast on a particular schedule and have your episodes published consistently by a particular time.

        Throw that all out.

        During an unpredictable time, you need to make new plans. And yes, you should make plans, but they'll be very different from before.

        With whatever plans you make, remember to be flexible.

        5. Focus the time you do get

        In his book Why We Want You To Be Rich, Robert T. Kiyosaki defines “FOCUS” as “Follow One Course Until Successful.” The core idea is that “focus” means doing nothing else but that task you mean to do, and doing that until you're finished or out of time.

        Because your time may be so short for the tasks you have, it's vital that you spend that time entirely focused on those tasks. Even if it's only a few minutes, isn't that better than no time at all?

        Here are some episodes, from fellow podcasters on my network, that I highly recommend to learn more about focusing effectively.

        6. Continuously plan and prepare new content

        You may no longer get the hours of preparation time you're used to. Instead, make it a regular practice to always be planning and preparing new stuff for your podcast.

        This is why I highly recommend tools like Evernote and Workflowy. They're available from PCs, tablets, and mobile devices, so they're very easy to load, edit, and add stuff as you develop ideas.

        You may find that carrying a notepad works better for you. Whatever your method, capture every idea and develop it as much as you can whenever you can.

        The point is to have developed content ready for when you have an opportunity to record.

        7. Have bare-minimum solutions ready

        It's common for podcasters to obsess over their gear. While it's good to record at the highest quality you can afford, that may not be possible when life is unpredictable.

        Even if you have a multi-thousand-dollar setup, have a bare-minimum option you can use if you must. Here are some suggestions:

        It's okay if you don't sound as pristinely as you usually do. The main things are for your audience to be able to hear and understand you. You don't have to apologize or maybe not even explain why your quality is different.

        8. Seize opportunities to record

        If you've been continuously planning and preparing new content, then be ready to record at any moment!

        New parents know the rarity and unpredictability of silence. Whatever your situation, when that opportunity comes up that you can record and you have content ready, jump on it! You may have no idea when you'll have another opportunity like it.

        9. Enlist helpers

        When you're open with your audience (back to tip #3), they may also be eager to help you. Such help could be in writing show notes, editing your episodes, publishing on your site, and more.

        This may even open up opportunities for future help, and be good practice for delegation.

        10. Create a new normal after this season

        Your life will probably be forever different after everything settles down. Embrace that difference and redefine your “normal.”

        During the unpredictable season, you may have discovered new hacks that can drastically improve your workflow. You may have discovered that you can cut out certain things from your process without negatively affecting anything else.

        Like consuming certain foods after an intense diet, you may discover a new appreciation or even a new distaste for what used to be normal. Thus, you may face some difficult decisions about the future of your projects.

        Whatever you decide, be open and respectful toward your audience, and they'll understand.

        Thank you for the podcast reviews!

        • From the UK, Tim Lewis, host of Begin Self-Publishing Podcast, said, “Great show for more advanced podcasters. Daniel gives information that more experienced podcasters need. The internet is awash with people who have run a few podcasts and start a podcasting course, but Daniel really knows his stuff and takes you through without too much waffle the important points a modern podcaster needs to know.” Look at Tim's site for some great examples of “getting started” and “what is a podcast” pages!

        Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

        Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

        Personal update: It's a boy!

        My wife, Jenny, and I are thrilled to have finally met our son, “Noodle Baby”! We're thankful to all our friends and family for the wonderful support.

        I don't normally ask for “handouts,” but if you know of any podcasting-themed baby things, you know they'll be perfect gifts for Noodle Baby!

        The Audacity to Podcast
        PO Box 739
        Burlington, KY 41005

        Announcements

        Need personalized podcasting help?

        I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

        Ask your questions or share your feedback

        Connect with me

        Disclosure

        This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

        ]]>
        https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-continue-podcasting-when-your-life-is-unpredictable-tap294/feed/ 1 Life can get crazy and unpredictable. It can be joyous moments like a birth or marriage. It can be sad moments like a death or job loss. It can be trying moments like a move or transition of any kind. Here are 10 tips for keeping your podcast going,
        1. Make life your highest priority
        2. Reduce your expectations
        3. Be open with your audience
        4. Discard old plans and make new ones (with flexibility)
        5. Focus the time you do get
        6. Continuously plan and prepare new content
        7. Have bare-minimum solutions ready
        8. Seize opportunities to record
        9. Enlist helpers
        10. Create a new normal after this season

        Thanks to Tim Lewis, host of http://beginselfpublishing.com/, for the 5-star review in iTunes!

        Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

        Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

        Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/294

        FEEDBACK
        Call (903) 231-2221
        Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
        Send a voice message from https://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

        MAILING ADDRESS
        The Audacity to Podcast
        PO Box 739
        Burlington, KY 41005]]>
        Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 37:00 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-continue-podcasting-when-your-life-is-unpredictable-tap294/
        Libsyn is offering free migration through Q1 2017, flat fee after that http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/T9Pt8w73fS4/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/libsyn-is-offering-free-migration-through-q1-2017-flat-fee-after-that/#comments Thu, 05 Jan 2017 16:43:21 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=12088

        Libsyn is making it more affordable to migrate your entire podcast archive to their powerful platform. Through March, 2017, podcasters can migrate up to 10 GB of episodes to Libsyn for free. In April, 2017, migrating up to that same amount will cost a flat rate of $25.

        Before 2017, Libsyn's migration service was a one-time cost based on how much archived media you transfer. A back catalog of episodes would cost 5¢ per megabyte (“archiving” current episodes costs 10¢ per megabyte).

        To understand the cost, imagine your podcast has 50 episodes, each an hour long and encoded with my recommended MP3 settings. With each episode being about 30 megabytes (MB), the total archive would be about 1.5 gigabytes (GB).

        1.5 GB archive × 5¢ per MB transfer fee = $75 total cost

        Libsyn's new offering would make this migration completely free through March 2017, or only $25 after that.

        How much can you fit in a 10 GB archive transfer? Assuming my recommended encoding settings, that lets you transfer up to 333 hours of content for free or only $25!

        This now makes it significantly more affordable to migrate your podcast archive to Libsyn and take advantage of their many great offerings.

        For migrations larger than 10 GB, contact Libsyn support for a custom quote.

        Click here to start your Libsyn account, and use promo code “NOODLE” to get the rest of this month and all of next month for free!

        Libsyn is one of only three podcast-media-hosting companies I recommend: Blubrry, Libsyn, and Spreaker (each for specific reasons and scenarios). For comparison, Blubrry will transfer your entire catalog for free; Spreaker charges based on total storage, so a migration is essentially free.

         

        ]]>
        https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/libsyn-is-offering-free-migration-through-q1-2017-flat-fee-after-that/feed/ 7 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/libsyn-is-offering-free-migration-through-q1-2017-flat-fee-after-that/
        Enter to win a podcasting prize in the 12 Days of PodChristmas Giveaway! http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/d72WsRWYdX4/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/enter-to-win-a-podcasting-prize-in-the-12-days-of-podchristmas-giveaway/#respond Mon, 19 Dec 2016 00:41:43 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=11866 In celebration of Christmas, I’m giving away more than $4,000 worth of podcasting prizes! I'm calling it “The 12 Days of PodChristmas Giveaway.”

        There will be a new prize each day, so you must re-enter each day, December 14–25, for a chance to win the daily prize!

        Click here to enter today's giveaway.

        (That link will always take you to the current day's giveaway.)

        Congratulations to the winners!

        1. One-year My Podcast Reviews™ Pro account: George E.
        2. SEO for Podcasters™ course: Paul B.
        3. Lifetime license for Social Subscribe & Follow Icons™: Denise S.
        4. One-year Podcasters' Society membership: Steve M.
        5. One-year My Podcast Reviews™ Pro account: Andres N.
        6. SEO for Podcasters™ course: Fredrick H.
        7. Lifetime license for Smart Podcast Player: Kathy P.
        8. One-year Podcasters' Society membership: Johnnie M.
        9. Pretty Link Pro (Blogger edition): Vern
        10. Lifetime license Simple Podcast Press: Susan W.
        11. One-year Zencastr Pro account: Scott
        12. 4 one-year Podcasters' Society memberships: Bryan E., Sherad LC, Justin F., and Gary C.

        Enter today's giveaway and share your lucky URL for more chances to win!

        ]]>
        https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/enter-to-win-a-podcasting-prize-in-the-12-days-of-podchristmas-giveaway/feed/ 0 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/enter-to-win-a-podcasting-prize-in-the-12-days-of-podchristmas-giveaway/
        7 Ways to Stay Connected with Your Audience During a Podcast Hiatus – TAP293 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/_Ca6z5mnn8c/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/7-ways-to-stay-connected-with-your-audience-during-a-podcast-hiatus-tap293/#comments Tue, 06 Dec 2016 15:47:46 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=11808 7-ways-to-stay-connected-with-your-audience-during-a-podcast-hiatus-wide

        Whether you're planning a holiday break, a seasonal hiatus, or need some time off, here are ways to stay connected with your audience so they will anticipate your show's return.

        I'm giving away over $3,000 worth of podcasting products and services in my 12 Days of PodChristmas Giveaway! Click here to sign up!

        1. Set expectations

        If your hiatus break will skip more than one episode, I recommend communicating a plan with your audience.

        Your plan could be as simple as “we won't have any episodes until we return on _____.” That tells your audience not to expect episodes, but to expect your return during that time.

        Or, if you choose to use any of the following tips to stay connected with your audience, communicate that. “I won't be here in the podcast, but I will be active in _____.”

        I recommend that you give advanced warning about the hiatus, and release a “Currently on hiatus” miniature episode. When you return, you can remove that episode from your feed.

        2. Point to active social account(s)

        It's easy to post on social networks. Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, and such allow you to stay engaged with your audience without requiring high production or preparation.

        I don't recommend pointing to every social account you have. Where Pat Flynn is known for saying, “Be everywhere,” I like to say, “Be everywhere you can be well.” Thus, instead of pointing to a dozen places people can follow you and not posting much to any of them, point them to one or two places to stay connected. With very few places to manage, it's easy to post frequently.

        This can also be a great opportunity to get better with a particular social network by forcing yourself to use it frequently.

        3. Preproduce miniature content

        A full podcast episode can be a lot of hard work. During a hiatus, you can scale back your commitment (as long as you've set the expectations with your audience).

        Imagine if your favorite podcasts took a three-month hiatus. Would you prefer to hear nothing from them until they return, or would you rather get tiny bits from them to hold you over.

        Miniature content can be short podcast episodes, blog posts, an email series, informal videos, live events, and anything else that doesn't take much time but maintains the relationship with your audience.

        Such miniature content can be preproduced and scheduled for automatic release during the hiatus.

        4. Use an email newsletter/autoresponder

        If you don't already have an email list, now could be a great time to start one! You can use your email list for many things, even during a hiatus. Your emails could be behind-the-scenes stories, short tips, or anything else that would be relevant to your audience.

        If you don't have an email list yet, I recommend getting started with MailChimp, Aweber, or ConvertKit.

        5. Participate in an online community

        Whether owned by you or by someone else, participating in a community during a hiatus can be a great way to continue the relationship with your fans. It can also help build your reputation, authority, and influence, which could result in gaining new subscribers.

        6. Offer direct contact

        You may decide maintaining a public connection with your audience isn't right for you and your show. If you still want to stay connected, consider offering a way for your audience to contact you directly. For example, “If you need help while we're on hiatus, please email us directly and we'll reply when we can.”

        7. Pick what's doable and fitting

        Going into a hiatus is not a good time to overcommit yourself. These tips I've provided are only options (and I welcome your suggestions in the comments!). Make sure the choice you make is something you can actually keep up with, and that it's an appropriate fit for your audience.

        Regardless of what you choose to do during a hiatus, remember the #1 tip: communicate so your audience will know what to expect.

        Thank you for the podcast reviews!

        • brakeb wrote in iTunes USA, “I learned a lot from Daniel. Daniel's show has definitely made me a better podcaster… He just makes you want to have a better podcast. I like how he lays everything out simply. His show notes are light years better than mine, which I'm working on. If you are a content producer, you definitely want to add this to your listening rotation.”
        • Sophie, host of The Edtech Podcast, wrote in iTunes UK, “A truly valuable resource for podcasters. Daniel has developed for the podcasting community a vast array of indepth, practical resources, through which to deliver great content and to innovate as the medium develops. Thanks Daniel!!”

        Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

        Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

        Announcements

        • Sign up for the 12 Days of PodChristmas for a chance to win one of over $3,000 worth of prizes!
        • I'm going on hiatus until late January while my first son or daughter (we're going to be surprised!) is born.

        Need personalized podcasting help?

        I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

        Ask your questions or share your feedback

        Connect with me

        Disclosure

        This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

        ]]>
        https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/7-ways-to-stay-connected-with-your-audience-during-a-podcast-hiatus-tap293/feed/ 1 Whether you're planning a holiday break, a seasonal hiatus, or need some time off, here are ways to stay connected with your audience so they will anticipate your show's return.
        Sign up for the 12 Days of PodChristmas giveaway at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/podchristmas

        1. Set expectations
        2. Point to active social account(s)
        3. Preproduce miniature content
        4. Use an email newsletter/autoresponder
        5. Participate in an online community
        6. Offer direct contact
        7. Pick what's doable and fitting

        Thanks to Sophie, host of http://theedtechpodcast.com/, and to "brakeb" for the 5-star reviews in iTunes!

        Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

        Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

        Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/293

        FEEDBACK
        Call (903) 231-2221
        Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
        Send a voice message from http://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

        MAILING ADDRESS
        The Audacity to Podcast
        PO Box 739
        Burlington, KY 41005]]>
        Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 25:31 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/7-ways-to-stay-connected-with-your-audience-during-a-podcast-hiatus-tap293/
        Should Your Podcast Take a Holiday Break? – TAP292 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/Z9cVAE8BX4s/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/should-your-podcast-take-a-holiday-break-tap292/#respond Tue, 29 Nov 2016 15:27:00 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=11691 should-your-podcast-take-a-holiday-break-wide

        Christmas, New Year's Day, and many more holidays affect people differently. Learn whether you should keep podcasting or take a break during a holiday.

        I cover this more thoroughly in a members-only webinar I did for Podcasters' Society, “How to Prepare Your Podcast for Breaks.” That's one of many resources to help you improve your podcast, available exclusively in Podcasters' Society. Click here to join and get immediate access to community, training, and support!

        1. Know your audience

        Geography

        What holidays affect your audience? The easiest way to know that would be to look at where your podcast is being downloaded.

        • Libsyn: Stats ➜ Show ➜ Geographic
        • Blubrry: Stats ➜ Geography ➜ World

        Most likely, if the top country (by a large margin) isn't your own, you may need to consider whether your own holidays will matter to the majority of your audience.

        For example, Memorial Day, President's Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, and Thanksgiving (in November) are nationally observed American holidays. Some of these may be known outside the USA (like Independence Day and Thanksgiving).

        Regardless of how you let a holiday affect your podcast, I recommend always being inclusive to those who may not know the holiday. Instead of being vague and saying, “the holiday,” be specific (for example, “It's Independence Day in America this week, …”).

        Immediacy

        It's also good to know the timelessness or “long tail” of your podcast episodes. Most podcasts will get the majority of their downloads in the first 72 hours. (Edison Research reports that 73% of podsumers play an episode within 48 hours of access.) If your podcast has this same “immediate” consumption pattern, then timely events and holidays may have a greater effect on your audience. But if your podcast has significant downloads continuing after the episode's first week, then timely events may not be as relevant to your audience.

        Lifestyles

        If you know your audience is affected by the same holidays as you, and they consume your podcast quickly, you should also think about the prominent lifestyle of your audience and how your podcast might fit into that.

        Consider Christmas and New Year's Day (which seem to be the most prominent international holidays). This is about a week or more that your audience's daily routines are significantly different. They may take time off work and thus may not be commuting. They may spend more time with family and friends and thus less time alone. They may spend more time with new “toys” and thus less time with established habits. And they may spend more time traveling to visit loved ones, but such traveling may be with others instead of alone.

        With this in mind, how does your podcast fit into the lifestyle of your audience? If your podcast is business-focused, then it may not be relevant or even desired around the holidays. If your podcast is entertainment-focused, it could be a way for your audience to escape holiday stress. And if your podcast is focused on something more relevant to the holidays (like family, health, and such), then your audience may need your podcast at that time.

        2. Know yourself

        Be realistic. How plausible is it for you to continue your podcast around a holiday? This significantly depends on your workflow and episode backlog.

        If you all your podcasting steps (planning, preparing, presenting, producing, publishing, and promoting) are within close proximity, then you may have very little margin for holidays.

        If your podcasting steps are more spread out, either through batching or through being several episodes ahead, then you have a lot more margin for holidays.

        What is actually doable for you? If you decide to podcast through the holiday, remember that value isn't measured in time. So your holiday episode doesn't have to be as time-consuming as your others, but it should still be as valuable.

        If you think it will be too stressful to podcast through the holiday, then don't feel bad for taking a break!

        3. Plan ahead

        Look at a calendar to see what holidays (or other events) might affect your podcasting schedule. When you know what's coming up, you can plan accordingly.

        For example, if you plan to take the entire month of December off but you want your podcast to continue, you can prerecord episodes weeks in advance.

        Or if you decide to not release episodes during that time, you can plan other ways to maintain a connection with your audience.

        4. Think long-term

        How will your decision today matter six months or a year from now? If your podcast is new, then taking a break in the beginning could certain slow your growth. If your podcast is established, a holiday break may not have a negative effect.

        Also consider how your decision will affect your podcast relative to your “competition.” What if you podcast when they're taking a break? Or what if you're taking a break while they're continuing to podcast?

        This also means that announcements or apologies about breaks won't matter once the break is past.

        Which is right for you?

        I don't think there's a definite right or wrong answer on this issue. It really depends on you, your podcast, and your audience. Some podcasts should probably continue through holidays, others should probably take a break.

        Consider these few things and make the decision you think is right for you. And remember that there may always be someone who will disagree and complain.

        For more information on this, including practical steps to prepare your podcast for breaks, join Podcasters' Society and check out our library of webinars, tutorials, and the amazing support of a mature community of podcasters!

        Thank you for the podcast reviews!

        • Ed Plumacher (AKA VI-EJP), host of iAccessVO, wrote in iTunes USA, “Informative and timely road map. Thank you for helping to shorten the learning curve for the launch of our podcast, iAccessVO. 29 episodes and one year later, we still find your podcast to be a valuable resource. Thank you for sharing such great information.”

        Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

        Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

        Announcements

        Need personalized podcasting help?

        I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

        Ask your questions or share your feedback

        Connect with me

        Disclosure

        This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

        ]]>
        https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/should-your-podcast-take-a-holiday-break-tap292/feed/ 0 Christmas, New Year's Day, and many more holidays affect people differently. Learn whether you should keep podcasting or take a break during a holiday.
        Christmas, New Year's Day, and many more holidays affect people differently. Learn whether you should keep podcasting or take a break during a holiday.



        I cover this more thoroughly in a members-only webinar I did for Podcasters' Society, "How to Prepare Your Podcast for Breaks." That's one of many resources to help you improve your podcast, available exclusively in Podcasters' Society. Click here to join and get immediate access to community, training, and support!

        1. Know your audience

        Geography

        What holidays affect your audience? The easiest way to know that would be to look at where your podcast is being downloaded.


        * Libsyn: Stats ➜ Show ➜ Geographic
        * Blubrry: Stats ➜ Geography ➜ World


        Most likely, if the top country (by a large margin) isn't your own, you may need to consider whether your own holidays will matter to the majority of your audience.

        For example, Memorial Day, President's Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, and Thanksgiving (in November) are nationally observed American holidays. Some of these may be known outside the USA (like Independence Day and Thanksgiving).

        Regardless of how you let a holiday affect your podcast, I recommend always being inclusive to those who may not know the holiday. Instead of being vague and saying, "the holiday," be specific (for example, "It's Independence Day in America this week, …").

        Immediacy

        It's also good to know the timelessness or "long tail" of your podcast episodes. Most podcasts will get the majority of their downloads in the first 72 hours. (Edison Research reports that 73% of podsumers play an episode within 48 hours of access.) If your podcast has this same "immediate" consumption pattern, then timely events and holidays may have a greater effect on your audience. But if your podcast has significant downloads continuing after the episode's first week, then timely events may not be as relevant to your audience.

        Lifestyles

        If you know your audience is affected by the same holidays as you, and they consume your podcast quickly, you should also think about the prominent lifestyle of your audience and how your podcast might fit into that.

        Consider Christmas and New Year's Day (which seem to be the most prominent international holidays). This is about a week or more that your audience's daily routines are significantly different. They may take time off work and thus may not be commuting. They may spend more time with family and friends and thus less time alone. They may spend more time with new "toys" and thus less time with established habits. And they may spend more time traveling to visit loved ones, but such traveling may be with others instead of alone.

        With this in mind, how does your podcast fit into the lifestyle of your audience? If your podcast is business-focused, then it may not be relevant or even desired around the holidays. If your podcast is entertainment-focused, it could be a way for your audience to escape holiday stress. And if your podcast is focused on something more relevant to the holidays (like family, health, and such), then your audience may need your podcast at that time.

        2. Know yourself

        Be realistic. How plausible is it for you to continue your podcast around a holiday? This significantly depends on your workflow and episode backlog.

        If you all your podcasting steps (planning, preparing, presenting, producing, publishing, and promoting) are within close proximity, then you may have very little margin for holidays.

        If your podcasting steps are more spread out, either through https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=11649 podcast-seo-for-itunes-google-play-music-and-more-apps-wide

        There are a lot of myths and misconceptions about podcast search-engine optimization (SEO). I have this information in my SEO for Podcasters course, and I want you to have the core understanding for what SEO stuff actually does and doesn't matter in podcasting.

        Through the end of 2016, use coupon code “podcastseo” to save $100 on my complete SEO for Podcasters course. Or, join Podcasters' Society and you get immediate access to the course and much more!

        Common podcast SEO bad advice and myths

        Before I get into what does matter, I need to point out some common misconceptions, bad advice, and myths I've heard from many podcasters (even some podcasting experts).

        Misconception: Podcast transcripts help SEO

        Getting your podcast audio transcribed is not an instant solution to podcast SEO. For the most popular podcast apps, those transcriptions will not affect your SEO at all. For websites, a transcript for show notes is better than a single sentence or paragraph.

        The fault of transcripts is in the amount of words relative to the quality of the content. Solo or interview podcasts may result in somewhat helpful transcripts, but conversation podcasts give horrible transcripts.

        Bad advice: Treat your author tag as a subtitle

        Although the author tag appears along with the title of your podcast in iTunes and other podcast apps, it is not a subtitle and should not be treated as such. The author tag is the place to put the creator (or creators) of the podcast, not to expound on the title or subject matter.

        Bad advice: Stuff your author tag with keywords

        The author tag is where you list the actual authors/creators/hosts of the podcast. The is not the place to stuff it with keywords, similar podcast names, names of your guests, or names of relevant famous people.

        Here's an example of the kind of bad author tag I'm talking about. I changed this to protect the quite guilty.

        Daniel J. Lewis chats with entrepreneurs Michael Hyatt, John Lee Dumas, and Pat Flynn with motivation from Steve Jobs, Abraham Lincoln, and Alexander the Great. If Seth Godin had a podcast, this would probably be it.

        Of all those names, who actually creates and hosts the podcast? Only one of them. And of all those names, who is actually alive?

        This kind of stuff will look horrible in your podcast listing, and it can even get your show blacklisted by Apple!

        Myth: ID3 tags affect your SEO

        ID3 tags are metadata you attach to your MP3 files. These are helpful for compatibility with various podcast apps and players, but they don't affect SEO because they aren't searched until they downloaded. Even after being downloaded to your subscriptions, some apps may not search the ID3 tags.

        I think this confusion comes from cross-platform terminology, like “tags,” “meta tags,” “metadata,” and “meta information.” These are is often used in reference to RSS feeds and webpage stuff, which do affect some SEO. But these tags in your ID3 tags don't affect SEO.

        Myth: Your podcast description is not searchable

        While it's true that some podcast apps don't search the description, other podcast apps do! (I'll point out which do one below.)

        The main purpose of your show description should be to tell someone why they should subscribe to the podcast and what to expect. That can be done with some SEO keywords, but it shouldn't be a priority to stuff the keywords.

        For example, if your description includes something like, “We talk about awesomeness, things that are awesome, and give tips for being awesome in your daily life,” you are both including keywords and telling more truth about your podcast.

        Myth: Podcast ratings and reviews affect iTunes ranking

        There are plenty of good reasons and uses for podcast ratings and reviews, but ranking is not one of them. Many podcasting experts (including Rob Walch, Paul Colligan, and myself) have tested, researched, and proven multiple times that subscriptions are the most important metric to podcast ranking. The charts weigh more heavily on new subscriptions within the last few days, and then fallback to total lifetime subscriptions.

        Doesn't it actually make sense for subscriptions to matter more than reviews? Think about measuring a book's popularity. Wouldn't you expect its popularity to be based on number of copies sold instead of on the number of reviews about the book?

        Misconception: Cover art doesn't matter for search

        The point of SEO is to make your podcast show up in relevant searches and to attract the right audience.

        The words in your podcast cover art will not make your podcast more findable. But where your cover art can help is in communicating the quality and subject of your podcast.

        Imagine you want a podcast about baking cakes. You enter some keywords in iTunes and the #1 result has cover art that shows a couple machine guns and cats. How relevant would that podcast seem to baking cakes?

        Your cover art is an opportunity to not only catch someone's eye, but also to help attract the right audience.

        Myth: Every word in certain fields is searchable

        Podcast apps search differently and place different emphasis on different types of words. A while back, a search for “clean comedy” would ignore the word “clean” and thus search for only “comedy.” The results were the top comedy podcasts—all explicit. Yikes, right?

        Many search engines have a list of words or types of words they ignore. These are commonly called “stopwords.” Those are usually short and seemingly unimportant words, like “a,” “the,” “to,” and such. Thus, some apps may return results for “audacity podcast” when you search for “The Audacity to Podcast,” even though the “the” and “to” in my title are extremely important.

        Besides these stopwords, some apps search with different styles of queries. Here are some examples with “audacity podcast” as the query:

        • “or” searches will return any results that match “audacity” or “podcast.”
        • “and” searches will return any results that include both “audacity” and “podcast.”
        • “exact” searches will return any results that include the exact phrase “audacity podcast” and would thus exclude “audacity to podcast.”
        • “similar” searches will use some intelligence to return results with similar words or similar forms of words, such as “podcasts” when you searched for “podcast.”

        I'm about to share a whole lot of information about different apps and RSS fields, so get my Podcast SEO Cheat Sheet for a quick reference!

        Get the Podcast SEO Cheat Sheet

        What matters to iTunes for podcast SEO

        Apple's iTunes and Podcasts apps are the top places for podcast searches and consumption. Thus, it's important to ensure your podcast is in Apple's apps and is appropriately findable.

        Most people (even many podcasting experts) think there are only three fields iTunes searches, but there are actually four!

        1. Show title

        This is the overall title of your podcast, in the channel-level <title> tag of your RSS feed.

        2. Show author

        This is the overall author/creator of your podcast, in the channel-level <itunes:author> tag of your RSS feed.

        3. Episode titles

        This is the title for each individual episode, in the item-level <title> tag of your RSS feed.

        4. Episode authors

        This is the secret one most podcasters don't know. It is the author/creator/guest for each individual episode, in the item-level <itunes:author> tag of your RSS feed.

        I show how to leverage each of these tags and best-practices inside my SEO for Podcasters, which is now included for all members of Podcasters' Society!

        What matters to Google Play Music for podcast SEO

        Google finally got back into supporting podcasts when they started including podcasts in Google Play Music in early 2016. I believe this will eventually become a major destination for podcast consumption (“podsumption”), so it's important to ensure your podcast is findable there.

        Google Play Music will first use any <googleplay:…> tags in your RSS feed and will fallback to the equivalent <itunes:…> tags if the Google Play Music tags don't exist.

        1. Show title

        This is the overall title of your podcast, in the channel-level <title> tag of your RSS feed.

        2. Show author

        This is the overall author/creator of your podcast, in the channel-level <googleplay:author> or <itunes:author> tag of your RSS feed.

        3. Show description

        This is the overall description of your podcast, in the channel level <googleplay:description><itunes:summary>, or <description> (in that order of priority).

        See? I told you your description is searched!

        Want to see all this information in a handy cheat sheet?

        Get free access to the Podcast SEO Cheat Sheet

        Again, I show how to leverage each of these tags and best-practices inside my SEO for Podcasters, which is now included for all members of Podcasters' Society! The Google Play Music part isn't in there, yet, but will be in the course updates in 2017.

        What matters to other popular podcast apps for SEO

        iTunes and Google Play Music are not the only popular podcast apps, so I researched more highly popular apps for what matters in their searches.

        • Stitcher: show title, show author, show description (<itunes:subtitle> or <description> field), episode titles, episode descriptions
        • Overcast: show title, show author, show description (<itunes:subtitle> or <description> field)
        • Pocket Casts, Downcast, and Castro: show title, show author
        • Podcast Addict: show title, show author, show description (<itunes:summary>, episode titles, episode authors, and optional iTunes search engine

        I know this is a lot of information, so look at my Podcast SEO Cheat Sheet to get a quick understanding and comparison.

        Click here to view the Podcast SEO Cheat Sheet

        Through the end of 2016, use coupon code “podcastseo” to save $100 on my complete SEO for Podcasters course. Or, join Podcasters' Society and you get immediate access to the course and much more!

        Thank you for the podcast reviews!

        • Mike Hayes (AKA “Hayesman22”), host of College Debt to Career Cash, wrote in iTunes USA,” Extremely helpful for a brand new podcaster as myself. Like many of us, I am trying to fine tune my audience and message. So to think in terms of reference or habit is thought provoking. To grow an audience, I think a good show will do both! Thanks for making me think more about the goal of my show. Also I enjoyed you mentioning the bible and the spiritual stuff! My podcast is: College Debt to Career Cash. I only have four episodes out and I have major improvements planned so go easy on me!”

        Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

        Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

        Need personalized podcasting help?

        I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

        Ask your questions or share your feedback

        Connect with me

        Disclosure

        This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

        ]]> https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/podcast-seo-for-itunes-google-play-music-and-more-apps-tap291/feed/ 8 Dispel the myths and misconceptions about podcast search-engine optimization (SEO). Learn what actually does and doesn't matter in podcasting.
        Get the my Podcast SEO Cheat Sheet at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/podcastseo

        Common podcast SEO bad advice and myths
        - Misconception: Podcast transcripts help SEO
        - Bad advice: Treat your author tag as a subtitle
        - Bad advice: Stuff your author tag with keywords
        - Myth: ID3 tags affect your SEO
        - Myth: Your podcast description is not searchable
        - Myth: Podcast ratings and reviews affect iTunes ranking
        - Misconception: Cover art doesn't matter for search
        - Myth: Every word in certain fields is searchable

        What matters to iTunes for podcast SEO
        1. Show title
        2. Show author
        3. Episode titles
        4. Episode authors

        What matters to Google Play Music for podcast SEO
        1. Show title
        2. Show author
        3. Show description

        What matters to other popular podcast apps for SEO
        - Stitcher: show title, show author, show description ( or field), episode titles, episode descriptions
        - Overcast: show title, show author, show description ( or field)
        - Pocket Casts, Downcast, and Castro: show title, show author
        - Podcast Addict: show title, show author, show description (, episode titles, episode authors, and optional iTunes search engine

        Thanks to Mike Hayes, host of http://www.collegedebttocareercash.com/ for the 5-star review in iTunes!

        Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

        Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

        Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/291

        FEEDBACK
        Call (903) 231-2221
        Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
        Send a voice message from http://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

        MAILING ADDRESS
        The Audacity to Podcast
        PO Box 739
        Burlington, KY 41005]]>
        Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 42:30 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/podcast-seo-for-itunes-google-play-music-and-more-apps-tap291/
        Is Your Podcast a Reference, or a Habit for Your Audience? – TAP290 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/Hzvgk7vKnB8/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/is-your-podcast-a-reference-or-a-habit-for-your-audience-tap290/#comments Tue, 15 Nov 2016 14:55:46 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=11633 is-your-podcast-a-reference-or-a-habit-for-your-audience-wide

        Reference or habit? These two approaches to your podcast could make a huge difference in engaging with your community and growing your audience.

        This topic was inspired by a conversation with Clay Lamb from Home Contractors HQ (current name).

        Why “reference” versus “habit” matters

        What I'm about to share with you could be the key in understanding why your podcast promotion may not be working, why your podcast audience may not be growing, and why you could be struggling to keep your podcast going.

        What is a “reference” podcast?

        A “reference” is something you use when you have a specific need. For example:

        • YouTube video on how to weld plumbing
        • Dictionary definition of a word
        • Encyclopedic resource to understand a subject
        • An answer to a question

        Generally, these are things you might not consume on a regular basis; people rarely read the dictionary page by page!

        You might have a “reference” podcast if each episode is serving only one or more isolated needs.

        There are cases where all of those combined needs may form a habit. For example, understanding how to maintain a car requires knowing how to check oil, tire pressure, change a flat tire, read indicator lights, add windshield-washer fluid, and more.

        Even then, when the need is met, the consumer might not stay.

        What is a “habit” podcast?

        A “habit” is something that becomes part of your life. Some habits are by choice, some are by necessity, and some are unintentional. Habits often connect to passions and lifestyles. For example:

        • Movies, novels, and comedy feed an ongoing desire for entertainment.
        • Self-help and spiritual materials feed an ongoing desire for improvement.
        • Topic/industry-specific content feeds an ongoing interest or passion.
        • Education feeds an ongoing need for knowledge and understanding.

        Note the theme of “ongoing” in each of these. A habit is ongoing.

        You might have a “habit” podcast if all your episodes are serving a bigger need, and people want to consume your episodes regularly because the podcast feeds an ongoing need or desire.

        A “habit” contains many needs. You may not be able to distinguish or even see all of your needs. Consider this very content for example! You may have never considered whether your podcast is a reference or a habit, but it's something that is feeding your ongoing interest in improving your podcast.

        How “reference” and “habit” affect your podcast

        Think of it this way. “Reference” generally means “one time,” and “habit” generally means “ongoing.”

        I believe for your podcast (a series you want people to subscribe to), you should seek to make it a “habit” podcast—fulfilling the ongoing needs or desires of your audience.

        “Reference” and “habit” may not be immediately evident from any particular podcast. For example, Mignon Fogarty's Grammar Girl Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Writing could seem like a reference podcast, but it actually makes a habit out of reference. Each episode shares valuable information you might be searching for, and the overall podcast feeds a bigger desire (and need) to get better at communicating in English. I have listened to every episode since the show's beginning, and I sometimes search the archive as a reference.

        Timely versus timeless content

        I think reference and habit are separate from timeliness and timelessness. Habit content can be timely or timeless, and reference content can also be timely or timeless. So I don't think you should see only timeless content as valuable and timely as a waste. Instead, you can choose the timeliness or timelessness of your content based on how well it feeds the habit for your audience.

        Audience growth

        If your podcast is purely reference content, then you could struggle to grow your audience because people don't think your podcast meets an ongoing need or desire.

        When you can design your podcast to provide habit content, then it's easier to grow an audience because they'll want to keep returning for more.

        Presentation perspective

        Even if you provide reference content, how you approach and communicate the content could make it also habit content.

        Movie-discussion podcasts are good examples of this. Each episode could be a self-contained discussion and reference about a one particular movie. But if the hosts integrate their unique perspectives (or an overall perspective of the podcast, such as music, philosophy, a specific actor, etc.), subscribers will become more interested in what the hosts think about any movie than simply wanting a reference about a particular movie.

        Interview-based podcasts can be both reference and habit, too. People will listen to your interviews not always because of the guest, but because of the conversations you create. Even for John Lee Dumas's template approach to EOFire (an approach overly imitated), people listen because of the expected value John designed his template to provide.

        Consider this example. You may have hundreds of recipes you want to share. If you have no authority or influence yet, people probably won't care about receiving recipe after recipe. But if all those recipes support the same diet, then each recipe becomes a reference to feed a habit.

        These approaches are more about how you present the content than the content itself.

        Focus on making “habit” content

        I think your best results will come from making your podcast feed a “lifestyle.” That is, an ongoing need or desire, either in the content itself or in your approach to the content—even if you offer “reference” content!

        This approach is what makes your audience put your podcast in their regular routine, instead of putting it on the shelf to reference only when necessary.

        (Personal aside to my fellow Christians: apply all of this to your perspective of the Bible and accountability and encouragement from fellow believers. These should not be merely “references,” but habits and part of our lives!)

        What kind of podcast are you creating? What kind of relationships, if any, are you inspiring by how your present your message?

        Thank you for the podcast reviews!

        • Jason (AKA “SkepticSmash”), from Skeptic Smash Talk Podcast, said in iTunes UK, “Brilliant and Informative. Really enjoy the tips and strategies, particularly when it comes to listener engagement and how to respect listeners, I wish more podcasters would pay attention to this.”

        Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

        Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

        Announcements

        Need personalized podcasting help?

        I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

        Ask your questions or share your feedback

        Connect with me

        Disclosure

        This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

        ]]>
        https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/is-your-podcast-a-reference-or-a-habit-for-your-audience-tap290/feed/ 3 Reference or habit? These two approaches to your podcast could make a huge difference in engaging with your community and growing your audience.
        Inspired by a conversation with Clay Lamb from http://homecontractorshq.com/.

        Thanks to Jason, host of http://www.skepticsmashtalk.com for the 5-star review in iTunes!

        Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

        Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

        Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/290

        FEEDBACK
        Call (903) 231-2221
        Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
        Send a voice message from http://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

        MAILING ADDRESS
        The Audacity to Podcast
        PO Box 739
        Burlington, KY 41005]]>
        Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 34:07 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/is-your-podcast-a-reference-or-a-habit-for-your-audience-tap290/
        How to Stay Safe and Secure in Podcasting – TAP289 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/fxq6obnLhbM/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-stay-safe-and-secure-in-podcasting-tap289/#comments Tue, 08 Nov 2016 14:21:40 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=11323 how-to-stay-safe-and-secure-in-podcasting-wide

        Internet security and privacy are deeply connected and important to your safety. Here are 17 tips to help you stay safe and secure in podcasting.

        1. Prioritize your privacy

        Transparency may seem great online, but this could be at the cost of your own privacy. Listen to my previous episode, “How to Protect Your Privacy While Podcasting,” for more information.

        2. Maintain reasonable ownership

        As much as possible, ensure you own or at least have significant control over the most important parts of your podcast:

        • RSS feed—Do you own the URL? Can you redirect it whenever and wherever you want? Is the URL reserved so no one else can steal it?
        • Domain—Always point people to your own domain, even if it merely points to somewhere else when you're starting out.
        • Hosting—You could have more control by leasing a VPS or dedicated server. However you host your website and media, keep backups so that you can more easily move, if you must.

        3. Use secure passwords

        Weak passwords are one of the easiest ways for “hackers” to access anything. Generally, the harder a password is to speak, type, and remember, the better it probably is!

        Secure passwords should be:

        • Long—Use the maximum number of characters a site or service will allow
        • Contain a mix of characters—Use numbers, uppercase and lowercase letters, and symbols
        • Avoid anything from a dictionary—Words are easy to guess
        • Not include anything personal—Birth dates, names, places, and such can all be figured out

        The only passwords you need to know are the ones you must enter without a password manager. For example, your mobile device's password, your PC's password, or your password-manager's password.

        4. Activate two-factor authentication everywhere

        Two-factor authentication (often abbreviated “2FA”) is when a second device or method is required for authorization. This could be a link or code sent through email, SMS, postal mail, phone call, or other notification.

        With 2FA, logging into a supported site or service on a computer would require not only the username and password, but also a code either generated by a different algorithm and available only on another device, or something sent to another location.

        5. Make up answers to security questions

        Darwyn, from Dealing With My Grief Podcast, commented on my episode about privacy:

        One thing that I do to protect myself when setting up accounts, is to never use true information for the security questions… For example, if one of my security questions for the account is “What's your mother's maiden name?” or “Name of your first school?” my answer might be something like “Applesauce.” The information doesn't have to be true, just something to which you can provide the correct answer. With things like classmates.com, ancestry.com or a Google search, it's very easy to find the real answers to these questions.

        You've probably seen those additional security questions that you can choose or customize. “Where were you born?” “What was your first car?” “Who was your first crush?” And so on. While some of these may be things only you know, it's probably more likely someone else could figure them out, especially with how transparent social networks make us.

        Usually, the answers don't actually have to be correct or even make sense. The answer could even be another secure password!

        Be careful with things like birth dates, as some services may require a photo ID at some point if you're locked out of your account. If the dates don't match, you could face a hard time.

        6. Use password-managers

        My previous three tips focused on securing your logins. That can be very difficult when you have only your memory to guide you. Thus, I fully recommend using intelligent password-managers to create, secure, and prefill this information for you.

        For password-managers, I recommend LastPass and 1Password.

        For two-factor authentication, I recommend Authy (which uses Google Authenticator), LastPass Authenticator, or 1Password.

        These tools will manage all your secure passwords, encrypt and store them securely, and protect other secure information (such as those fake answers to security questions).

        7. Backup regularly (and redundantly)

        Accept this fact: the universe isn't perfect and, at some point, something important will fail. This is why it's so important to backup all your important stuff (if not everything).

        Consider backing up:

        • Your computer hard drive (at least your important data on it)
        • Your mobile devices
        • Your podcast episodes
        • Your website files
        • Your website database(s)

        Think of it this way. If a nuclear bomb went off where you store your data, do you have a backup somewhere?

        For WordPress backups, I recommend BackupBuddy.

        For PC backups, I recommend BackBlaze as your remote backup and an external hard drive for local backups.

        8. Archive instead of deleting

        What happens to podcast episodes after they die? Keep an archive of all your podcast episodes, even if it's only the MP3s. I've worked with some podcasters who had lost their episodes and had no way to recover them.

        When you finish with a podcast episode, I recommend you compress the episode folder and archive it somewhere safe and secure. My current favorites are BackBlaze B2, Amazon S3, and Amazon Cloud Drive (my current choice). You could also use a spare hosting account, if that's acceptable use of their service.

        9. Update frequently (and upgrade when you can)

        WordPress, website plugins, apps, and many other tools release frequent updates. I'm not saying you need to upgrade to the latest versions, but I do think you should stay updated with the latest patches.

        For example, an operating-system upgrade may be too risky with older hardware and software, but you should keep that operating system version as updated as possible with all its security patches.

        You should do the same for your website, too.

        The latest upgrades will usually be more secure, so it's best to upgrade when you can.

        10. Share login access smartly and rarely

        Many sites, services, and people may require access to your other accounts. As much as possible, avoid outright giving usernames and passwords—especially to fringe social-media tools.

        Use APIs or OAuth (authenticating through a service instead of giving your login) as much as possible when one thing needs to access another.

        If you must share login access with another person, use a password-manager to share the login without exposing your password. You could, instead, make or authorize an additional account for temporary access.

        For example, make another admin account if you need someone to do something on your WordPress site. Then, when they're finished, you can delete the account or downgrade its access.

        Or, someone might need to access your Google account (for YouTube, Google Docs, FeedBurner, Anaytics, etc.). Instead of giving your username and password, authorize their Google account to access that thing of yours, or transfer the thing (such as a FeedBurner feed) to them (if you trust them).

        And as much as possible, avoid sharing login access with anyone or anything.

        Instead of logging into sites with a social account, I recommend creating a username and password for each site. This way, if someone gets access to your social account, they're not able to login to a bunch of your other accounts.

        Also be careful with what sites or services you connect to your social accounts, even if it's through API or OAuth. They may post without your knowing it.

        11. Be cautious on public or unsecure Wi-Fi

        You would be surprised how much information can be harvested over public or unsecure wireless networks. Ensure anything you login to is done over HTTPS (you'll see “https://” in the address bar).

        Another good way to protect yourself is by using a virtual private network (VPN) that allows you to encrypt and route your Internet traffic through somewhere else.

        12. Secure your mobile devices

        Mobile devices could be the weakest point in your security. Not only could they already contain sensitive information on them, but they could also be used to access your other secure accounts (with two-factor authentication). And because mobile devices are small and valuable, they're also big targets for theft.

        So ensure your mobile device has the utmost security enabled: encryption, location-tracking, “bricking” or erasing after a certain number of failed login attempts, and instant-locking (instead of locking with a password after some time).

        Beyond the digital side of the security, also be secure with the physical side. Protect your phone from damage by putting it in a protective case. If it's your two-factor authentication device, you wouldn't want it to be disabled when you need to login! Also protect the device from theft by carrying it in harder-to-steal areas and not setting it out where someone could easily grab it and run.

        13. Think critically

        A whole bunch of disasters can be avoided by making smarter decisions. I can't say your gut will always be right about what or whom to trust, but when you feel like something is not right, do not proceed!

        Here are some suggestions.

        • If someone—even someone you trust—sends you a URL with no explanation, you probably shouldn't click on it.
        • Don't give out personal information to companies calling you! If they claim to be from the government or a company you do business with, insist on calling them back through a number you trust.
        • If something sounds too good to be true, it probably isn't true.

        A little critical thinking can go a long way to protecting yourself! (And don't fall for those scams claiming to be the IRS!)

        14. Monitor weak spots

        There will always be potential holes in any system. So here are some ways to keep things in check to alert you to problem or quickly fix things once they've been compromised.

        • Monitor credit-card and bank statements to ensure you're not paying for things you didn't buy.
        • Regularly re-evaluate OAuth and API access you've granted. This is usually in a section like “Applications,” “API,” “Access,” or “Connected Accounts.” If you don't use something anymore, revoke its access.
        • Look for indicators of problems, such as sudden performance issues, which could indicate a brute-force attack; password-reset requests on your accounts; and other suspicious activity.
        • Scan for malware on your websites to ensure no one snuck anything on through some security hole.

        15. Implement protections

        Protections are important, but you can't always rely on them. The most common protections are:

        • Antivirus—blocking and scanning for threats that can damage and spread
        • Firewall—preventing unauthorized or suspicious activity from getting through (in or out)
        • Malware-scanning—finding and eliminating stuff that shouldn't be there
        • Denial-of-Service prevention—protecting against systems that will use brute force to crack a password or simply crash a server

        16. Enable encryption

        Think about your own computer. It may have a username and password required to use the computer, but what if someone connected the hard drive to a different computer? They may be able to access all your files with little or no problem. Encryption can prevent that.

        Encrypting data will make it inaccessible without a decryption key. The latest operating systems usually offer advanced encryption technologies that will barely affect performance. On my macOS PC, for example, the decryption adds only a few seconds to my boot-up and an imperceivable delay on launching programs.

        17. Find people you can trust

        All of these methods for protecting yourself and your data are important. It's also important that you have a couple people you can trust with access to all of this. I think the first person should be your husband or wife. Additionally, consider trusting someone outside your family.

        Think of the worst-case scenarios and take necessary steps to equip others to help in such cases.

        What steps are you taking to keep yourself and your podcast safe and secure?

        Thank you for the podcast reviews!

        • Rudy (AKA “Biggrood”), host of Cascade Hiker Podcast, said in iTunes USA, “I have used soooo many tips from your show. Thanks for always answering my questions… even though I haven't ever asked you one! The show notes have been helpful in the past as well. My podcast, Cascade Hiker Podcast, has been gaining traction thanks to this show.”

        Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

        Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

        Announcements

        Need personalized podcasting help?

        I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

        Ask your questions or share your feedback

        Connect with me

        Disclosure

        This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

        ]]>
        https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-stay-safe-and-secure-in-podcasting-tap289/feed/ 1 Internet security and privacy are deeply connected and important to your safety. Here are 17 tips to help you stay safe and secure in podcasting.
        1. Prioritize your privacy
        2. Maintain reasonable ownership
        3. Use secure passwords
        4. Activate two-factor authentication everywhere
        5. Make up answers to security questions
        6. Use password-managers
        7. Backup regularly (and redundantly)
        8. Archive instead of deleting
        9. Update frequently (and upgrade when you can)
        10. Share login access smartly and rarely
        11. Be cautious on public or unsecured Wi-Fi
        12. Secure your mobile devices
        13. Think critically
        14. Monitor weak spots
        15. Implement protections
        16. Enable encryption
        17. Find people you can trust

        Thanks to Rudy, host of http://cascadehikerpodcast.com for the 5-star review in iTunes!

        Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

        Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

        Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/289

        FEEDBACK
        Call (903) 231-2221
        Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
        Send a voice message from http://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

        MAILING ADDRESS
        The Audacity to Podcast
        PO Box 739
        Burlington, KY 41005]]>
        Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 57:07 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-stay-safe-and-secure-in-podcasting-tap289/
        How to Protect Your Privacy While Podcasting – TAP288 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/yiOoMt1P-ww/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-protect-your-privacy-while-podcasting-tap288/#comments Tue, 01 Nov 2016 14:29:30 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=11302 how-to-protect-your-privacy-while-podcasting-wide

        Your privacy is important and you could be compromising it with your podcast! Here are eight ways to protect your personal and professional privacy while podcasting.

        Why is privacy important?

        There are a lot of horrible people in the world who could harm you or your family. Such harm could be physical, emotional, financial, or other intangible forms.

        You should be even more concerned about your privacy if you have shared any kind of controversial opinions (especially conservative ones).

        Besides worrying about the creeps of the world, you may also need to protect your privacy because of your job, contractual obligations, or anything else. It may not be an issue of what's allowed, but more about what honors the spirit of relationships, positions, agreements, and associations.

        For example, Apple is extremely protective about what messages are communicated from the company. Employees may be prohibited from publicizing their employment with Apple. They may also be prohibited from engaging in certain conversations because they could be seen as endorsements from an Apple representative. Other companies may have similar—and reasonable—policies.

        While protecting your privacy may seem to limit freedoms, it can also give freedoms you wouldn't otherwise have.

        For whatever reasons you hold, here are eight ways to protect your privacy while podcasting.

        1. Consider a pseudonym or partial name

        Creating a fictitious name or not using your full name will make it harder for others to compromise your privacy. This is not necessarily the best option, but it may be the most effective with the least effort.

        This will most likely not work if you have already put your name out in the public. But if you're starting out, it's something you can consider.

        Listen to my previous episode, “Should you podcast under your real name, or a pseudonym?” for more thoughts on whether this is the right choice for you.

        2. Beware the “whole story” you're telling

        You may not be giving away your home address in a single episode, but you have to think about every clue you reveal.

        For example, you may reveal all of the following facts across different episodes, blog posts, and social-network posts:

        • Where you shop and what's nearby
        • How far you drive to work
        • What your company does
        • Something unique about your home area
        • A photo of your house
        • The name of someone else who might not be as protective of their privacy
        • When and where you attend a regular meeting, such as a church service

        With a combination of information like this, it would be fairly easy to figure out where you live, what valuables you might have, and when you'll be gone.

        Scary, right? You should be scared! This kind of stuff may sound like something from a spy movie or show, but it can be a reality. You need to be very careful, especially with how impossible it is to completely remove something from the Internet.

        3. Adjust privacy settings on social networks

        Facebook is notorious for frequently changing privacy settings. You should be aware of such changes and adjust your settings for any social network or account you make.

        For example, some sites may make public:

        • Your birthday
        • Your home city
        • Your location in a photo or post

        Beyond what information you share on such sites, you may also need to customize who can see that information. Facebook, for example, lets you group friends into different lists. You can then customize which lists can see what information in your account, or exclude certain lists from seeing things.

        4. Read privacy policies

        Generally, if a company has a privacy policy, that seems to make them more trustworthy. Nonetheless, it's still important for you to read anything you're agreeing to.

        For example, a privacy policy may address who can access your contact information, what rights the company has with showing your association, and so on.

        You usually don't have the option to use services without agreeing to their policies, but reading their policies can inform you on what you may need to do to further protect your privacy.

        5. Rent a mailing address

        If you need to enter a physical address anywhere other than with trusted online retailer, I think you should consider having another address.

        For example:

        • WHOIS information on domains shows a name, address, telephone number, and email address
        • Some annoying sites ask for a physical address when they really don't need it
        • You may want to give your audience the ability to send you things
        • Your address may used to populate a user map or display your city (this is a bigger concern if your physical addresses is in a smaller town)

        For these uses and others, I highly recommend that you have another address you're okay with sharing. This could be any of the following:

        • PO Box
        • Local shipping/mailbox company
        • Earth Class Mail or other online mail service

        6. Invest in privacy protection and ID-theft insurance

        Speaking of addresses, have you ever looked at what information is freely available when someone does a WHOIS search on a domain you own? Try it yourself!

        Many hosting companies and domain registrars offer privacy-protection services for the WHOIS database. Instead of displaying your home address, the company might display their own contact information and forward stuff to you. This is typically a few dollars per year per domain. Thus, it may cost more or less than renting a mailing address, depending on how many domains you own.

        Since you're putting your life online (even a small aspect of it), you may want to also invest in ID-theft protection. This might come through your home insurance, business insurance, or a separate insurance provider.

        ID-theft insurance may not protect you from identity-theft, but it could alert you to concerns, cover expenses when you face a problem, and even replace your income if you must take time off work in order to resolve problems.

        7. Use separate email accounts or addresses

        You may not be able to see what email address is associated with someone else's online account, but many tools can search for online accounts based on an email address.

        For example, tools like Rapportive can show someone your name, Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and other information based on your email address. Using multiple addresses prevents the reverse-searches.

        If you use Gmail or Google Apps, an easy trick is at “+SOMETHING” to your email address. This will function as an additional email address without having to create additional accounts. For example, you could have john+twitter@gmail, john+facebook@gmail, and such. However, some sites won't accept a plus sign in your email address.

        Whatever address you use must be highly secure. If someone could get access to your email account, they could take over any other account tied to that email.

        If you use email forwarders, make sure access to those settings (usually on your domain registrar or web host) is also extremely protected.

        8. Implement security measures

        Online security is another issue all to itself, but poor security can compromise your privacy.

        In short, here are some things you should be using in order to keep your private information secure:

        • Separate, unique, secure passwords for everything—A good password should be long and contain numbers, uppercase and lowercase letters, symbols, and no words.
        • Password managerLastPass and 1Password are the best and most popular managers. These can generate secure passwords for you, encrypt and store them in the cloud, and allow you to access them across different devices.
        • Two-factor authentication (2FA)—This is when signing into something requires an additional step, such as entering a code from an app, SMS, or email.
        • Secure storage for sensitive information—Don't save your passwords in a “passwords.txt” on your desktop! Ensure whatever sensitive information you have is stored securely and encrypted.

        These eight things will help you protect your privacy while podcasting, and even while doing almost anything online.

        How else do you protect your own privacy? Comment below!

        Thank you for the podcast reviews!

        • Rodger Paxton, host of The LAVA Flow, wrote in iTunes USA, “I listen to lots of podcasts on podcasting, and this is the best in a category with lots of greats. I never miss an episode. I started listening to TAP to start my first podcast, and now I have two out and I'm starting a new podcast network, thanks in no small part to Daniel. Keep up the great work!”

        Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

        Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

        Announcements

        • You will be able to join Podcasters' Society this week now that I'm completing a backend migration. That also means that I'll be back to hosting free, monthly webinars!

        Need personalized podcasting help?

        I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

        Ask your questions or share your feedback

        Connect with me

        Disclosure

        This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

        ]]>
        https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-protect-your-privacy-while-podcasting-tap288/feed/ 1 Your privacy is important and you could be compromising it with your podcast! Here are eight ways to protect your personal and professional privacy.
        Why is privacy important?
        1. Consider a pseudonym or partial name
        2. Beware the "whole story" you're telling
        3. Adjust privacy settings on social networks
        4. Read privacy policies
        5. Rent a mailing address
        6. Invest in privacy protection and ID-theft insurance
        7. Use separate email accounts/addresses
        8. Implement security measures

        Thanks to Rodger Paxton, host of http://TheLAVAFlow.com for the 5-star review in iTunes!

        Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

        Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

        Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/288

        FEEDBACK
        Call (903) 231-2221
        Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
        Send a voice message from http://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

        MAILING ADDRESS
        The Audacity to Podcast
        PO Box 739
        Burlington, KY 41005]]>
        Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 38:06 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-protect-your-privacy-while-podcasting-tap288/
        How to Record Podcasts in Multitrack – TAP287 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/fklNakALTiw/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-record-podcasts-in-multitrack-tap287/#comments Tue, 25 Oct 2016 12:41:01 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=11285 how-to-record-podcasts-in-multitrack-wide

        Here are several ways to accomplish the flexibility of multitrack recording with different podcasting hardware and software.

        Before you go down this path of learning how to record podcasts in multitrack, check out my previous episode about why and why not to record podcasts in multitrack.

        Multitrack basics

        To produce your podcast in multitrack, you three things:

        1. Separated audio channels (voices, sounds, etc.)
        2. Multitrack interface/recorder
        3. Multitrack editing software (also known as “digital audio workstation” or “DAW”)

        1. Separated audio channels

        Multitrack recording is pointless if all your audio is mixing together into the same track.

        Every participant in your podcast should have their own microphone. This is not only necessary for separating the audio channels, but it's also necessary for clear listening. There are some exceptions, such as in-person newscaster-style interviews or high-end video with specialized equipment and techniques.

        Podcasting with remote participants can make separating audio channels more complicated. For example, if you have multiple participants connected through the same method (such as Skype, Hangouts, telephone, and such), their voices are mixed into a single channel. You'll run into a similar complication if you use the same device for both remote participants and your soundtrack (music, segues, sound clips, etc.). I'll explain possible solutions further down.

        Depending on your podcasting hardware and software workflow, you may have to make choices about how you separate audio channels. For example, you may be limited to only two channels, but you have three voices. In such a scenario, you must choose which channels to combine into the same track, such as in-studio cohosts on one track and remote participants on the other track.

        2. Multitrack interface/recorder

        When you have separated audio channels, you need a way to capture that audio without mixing everything together.

        Most of the mixers within podcaster budgets may have multiple input channels, but only two output tracks. So even if you have a 6-track recorder, you'll be limited to the number of tracks your interface can support.

        The inverse could also be a problem. You could have a multitrack mixer, but your recorder may be limited to only two tracks (stereo).

        The ideal multitrack recorder will let you capture each audio channel into its own track, instead of combining channels into separate sides of a stereo track.

        3. Multitrack editing software

        Most audio- and video-editing software supports multitrack editing on PCs. But multitrack editing is not as common with mobile apps.

        Workflow will vary with each app. Generally, you need the ability to edit or process one track without affecting the other, as well as the ability to edit or process multiple tracks.

        For example, can you delete a cough from one track without deleting the words from another? Or can you delete something and have it shift all the tracks together and maintaining alignment?

        Multitrack editing requires a little more knowledge of the tools, especially understanding things link synchronization, target tracks, cross-track edits, split-edits, and more. The most popular multitrack editors (including Audacity and Adobe Audition) already support these features.

        With understanding these three basics, you can work with your particular tools or upgrade to the right tools to accomplish your needs.

        How to separate tracks through PCs and mobile

        If you host your podcast with remote participants, there are two ways to separate each voice (or soundtrack) into separate channels.

        Record each participant independently at the source

        This is usually called “double-ender” or “multi-ender.” It's the easiest way to get every participant on their own audio track and get the highest audio quality from each of them!

        When you record the mix you receive, it can be susceptible to quality-limitations set by the software (maybe the app won't stream the audio any higher than 16 kbps) and also a victim of available bandwidth (due to Internet connectivity or the device's own processing power). The result could then be much lower quality than what was sent.

        Thus, the core idea for multi-ender recording is to have each participant record the audio from their side. This means the recording comes directly from their equipment and is thus more likely immune to software and connectivity limitations (as long as they're using the right tools). Always test before you rely on this.

        One way to accomplish this is by having each participant record their own side, such as through their own tools or software.This is a more complicated approach, and I would never recommend this for a guest who isn't already familiar with such tools. Always ensure the recording settings (especially the KHz rate and bit-depth) are the same for each participant and this will minimize the chance of audio that doesn't stay synchronized (also known as “drift”).

        The other way to accomplish this is with specialized tools that handle the recording and synchronization. Such tools come and go, but here are the top three I recommend (as of October, 2016):

        The multi-ender technique will give you multiple audio files, each with only one voice in them. If you don't use a tool that synchronizes these for you, I recommend you use something to capture a reference mix of everything. Then, have each participant take turns with a loud clap that will give you a spike for easily aligning your multiple tracks. (This same technique works for recording separate audio with video projects.)

        Separate each participant into different different devices and channels

        If you have more than one remote participant, the most effective way to record them in multitrack is to completely separate their audio. This gets complicated and expensive, because it means you need multiple audio interfaces and call “lines.”

        For example, you could run multiple instances of Skype on a single PC and add multiple audio interfaces to that PC. This would allow each instance of Skype to send its audio to a specific audio interface, which then connects to different inputs and outputs on your mixer.

        Alternatively, you could use completely separate devices for each participant. You can use separate PCs, smartphones, tablets, or even iPod Touches for each incoming participant. Again, this would require multiple inputs and outputs from your mixer.

        What makes this even more complicated is that each input needs its own targetable output so that you can send that participant the mix of all the other tracks minus their own voice. That's why we call it “mix minus.” So if your mixer has only one auxiliary or effect output, then you're most likely limited to only a single mix minus.

        You may be able to work around this if you have a fancy multitrack interface with your PC. But that may still require software to combine the separate tracks into virtual mix minuses for each participant.

        See how complicated this can get? The more participants you want on their own tracks, the more expensive this gets. That's why many podcasters are turning to more modern, more intelligent multi-ender methods.

        How to record multitrack with most devices (2-track stereo)

        Nearly all audio mixers, interfaces, and recorders support stereo. Stereo can be considered a single track with both left and right tracks when you need audio-positioning effects (such as in music reviews, dramas, and other experiential effects). Otherwise, consider any stereo device to be a two-track device.

        Capturing two separate tracks with a stereo device is probably the easiest method. Simply use the pan/balance controls to move one channel fully left and move the other channel fully right. This control is usually built into every channel on nearly all mixers.

        This will sound a little weird while you're recording, because you'll hear yourself in one ear and the other audio (whether a person or your soundtrack) in another ear.

        If your audio gear doesn't allow you to adjust the pan or balance of the audio, you could consider upgrading, or buying a simply splitter for your audio recording. But you must pay attention to what the splitter can actually do. Most “splitters” you see are really only cloning the same audio into two separate destinations instead of splitting one channel from the other.

        When you use “stereo” for multitrack recording, you'll end up with completely different audio in the left side from the right side. For the love of audio, please don't publish your episodes sounding that way! It's not only a horrible listening experience (even if you reduce the stereo separation), but it could be impossible for some people to listen when they can use only a single earbud or headphone.

        Fixing this separation is really easy. You could mixdown to mono when you create your MP3. But most editing software (even Audacity) will have a way to split a stereo track into separate mono tracks. I have a tutorial showing how to do that inside Podcasters' Society.

        I have two cautions with this workflow.

        1. VOIP/live-streaming software—Depending on the program and interface, you may be sending stereo-separated audio to your audience (such as with “Studio Mode” in Hangouts on Air). But if the program uses mono (such as Skype or “Voice Mode” in Hangouts on Air), it may select only the left channel. Thus, put your voice—or whatever is supposed to go back out to your participants or live audio—in the left channel.
        2. Headphone leak and mic placement—If you follow my frequent recommendations to avoid plosives by pivoting your microphone around your mouth 45º to the right or left (so that it points at your mouth from a slight side), this places your microphone closer to one particular ear. Thus, it's easier for the microphone to capture audio leaking from your headphones. Since I recommend putting your voice in the left channel (in accordance with my previous caution), I also recommend putting your microphone on that same side. That would keep other audio from leaking into your microphone and causing a slight echo. Alternatively, you can reverse the orientation of your headphones or earbuds so that your audio is still in the left channel, but you put your left earbud or headphone in your right ear.

        How to record multitrack with a recorder

        Perhaps, instead of an app or an interface, you have a multitrack recorder. For example, the Zoom H6 records up to six tracks.

        You could use such a device in the place of a mixer, audio interface, and PC and connect multiple audio sources directly to it. That works fine for in-person multitrack. Because the H6 isn't a mixer, you won't be able to do mix-minus to easy account for remote participants.

        However, you could allow one remote participant to hear your local voices through the device's built-in microphone but route their own voice into the recorder (where your headphones are also connected).

        Another way to handle the multitrack with a recorder is to use a mixer that has multiple separate outputs. For example, the Behringer 1204 line offers two main outputs and two alternate outputs (other mixers may offer “subgroup” outputs). This gives up to four separate output channels.

        If you're not doing mix minus with your mixer, you could even use your auxiliary and effects outputs as two separate outputs.

        Then, you may need some cables and adapters in order to send these to the right inputs on your recorder.

        How to record multitrack with a multitrack mixer or interface

        If your budget allows, you may consider a high-end digital mixer or audio interface that connects via USB 2.0 (or higher), Firewire, or Thunderbolt. These usually send each channel as a separate track, and then you simply need to set your recording software to record all the tracks (and perhaps map them appropriately). Even Audacity can record as many tracks as the single device supports!

        Some mixers, such as the Behringer UFX1204 will also function as recorders and save the separate audio tracks to an external hard drive.

        Make sure you research the multitrack device carefully. Many of these will record all tracks “prefader,” which means that any muting or fader adjustments on the device won't be reflected in the recording. That's not a huge inconvenience, but it could affect your workflow since it means each mic is effectively always unmuted.

        It's complicated and expensive; do you really need it?

        As you can tell, multitrack recording can be very complicated and get really expensive. Thus, I think you should consider whether you truly need all the flexibility you get with multitrack recording. Listen to my previous episode to further explore why or why not to record in multitrack. Consider what else you could do with the time and money it would cost for an ideal multitrack setup.

        If you truly need the flexibility of multitrack, and you have regular cohosts, consider simple tools like Cast, Ringr, or Zencastr; or consider teaching your cohosts how to record and send you their own audio.

        Thank you for the podcast reviews!

          Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

          Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

          Announcements

          • For my upcoming 300th episode, listen to my first episode and either share a lesson for it, or tell me what you would tell that podcaster to help him improve.

          Need personalized podcasting help?

          I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

          Ask your questions or share your feedback

          Connect with me

          Disclosure

          This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

          ]]>
          https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-record-podcasts-in-multitrack-tap287/feed/ 2 Here are several ways to accomplish the flexibility of multitrack recording with different podcasting hardware and software.
          Multitrack basics
          1. Separated audio channels (voices, sounds, etc.)
          2. Multitrack interface/recorder
          3. Multitrack editing software (also known as "digital audio workstation" or "DAW")

          How to separate tracks through PCs and mobile
          - Record each participant independently at the source
          - Separate each participant into different different devices and channels

          How to record multitrack with most devices (2-track stereo)

          How to record multitrack with a recorder

          How to record multitrack with a multitrack mixer or interface

          It's complicated and expensive; do you really need it?

          Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

          Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

          Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/287

          FEEDBACK
          Call (903) 231-2221
          Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
          Send a voice message from http://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

          MAILING ADDRESS
          The Audacity to Podcast
          PO Box 739
          Burlington, KY 41005]]>
          Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 47:50 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-record-podcasts-in-multitrack-tap287/
          Why and Why Not to Record Podcasts in Multitrack – TAP286 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/VRKEDz9q428/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/why-and-why-not-to-record-podcasts-in-multitrack-tap286/#comments Tue, 18 Oct 2016 13:07:38 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=11269 why-and-why-not-to-record-podcasts-in-multitrack-wide

          Multitrack recording keeps audio source separate. Here are some reason why you may and may not want to record your podcast in multiple tracks.

          The difference between channels and tracks

          Mixers, audio interfaces, recorders, and other audio devices will often refer to tracks and channels.

          Generally, channels are how many separate audio paths a device supports. For examples, Mackie describes their mixers by the number of channels: 8-channel, 12-channel, 18-channel, and such. Behringer uses the word “inputs” to mean the same thing (although they technically have more inputs than they say).

          Tracks, also sometimes called bus, represent the final mix and separation of all the channels. You know 1-track audio as “mono,” and 2-track audio as “stereo.” However, the number of tracks does not necessarily imply any kind of perceived physical positioning (such as left and right). Most devices support at least two tracks, which are usually treated as stereo.

          Consider the Behringer X1204USB and the UFX1204. Both are 12-channel mixers. The X1204USB (and most of the 1204 line) outputs only two tracks through USB or through the main outputs. You can get an additional two tracks from the Alt or Subgroup outputs, effectively turning it into a four-track analog mixer (but the USB is still only two tracks).

          The UFX1204 outputs up to 16 tracks via USB to a PC or directly to USB storage. That makes it a 16-track device. Each track can be treated as an individual mono source.

          Stereo audio is technically multitrack. If you have the same audio going to both tracks, you're treating it as a single, stereo track, not two separate tracks. However, it's possible to use stereo for multitrack, which I'll explain further in the next episode.

          Thus, when we refer to multitrack, it generally means separating audio sources into their own tracks. Here's what a 4-track podcast could look like:

          Track 1: Main host
          Track 2: Cohost
          Track 3: Guest
          Track 4: Soundtrack

          Benefits to recording podcasts in multitrack

          Multitrack has some definite advantages that you might want for your podcasting. It's all about the flexibility multitrack-recording offers.

          1. Powerful editing

          When each participant or the soundtrack is separated, it's easy to edit almost anything. Here are some examples.

          • If one participant coughs while the other is talking, you can edit out the cough without affecting the speaking you want your audience to hear.
          • If participants talk over each other (accidentally or intentionally), it's easy to edit out or shift things so the conversation is still understandable.
          • If you have any background audio during the opening or closing, you never have to worry about perfecting the timing because you can shift things in editing when they didn't align in recording.
          • If make a mistake while you have background music or other audio, you can edit out the mistake and shift the background. This won't sound obviously edited because you didn't have to cut anything from the background audio.

          2. Specific loudness adjustments

          A common problem when there's more than one audio source (whether a person or a soundtrack) is the loudness between the multiple sources. For various reasons, one cohost's voice could be a different volume from the other.

          Compression can help with this, but when it's really only one source that needs the loudness-correction, recording it on its own track means you can adjust it without affecting the other tracks.

          3. Targeted processing

          Audio equipment, microphone technique, voice, and environment could be—and most likely are—different for each audio source (person or soundtrack). Thus, the ideal processing for one source may not be ideal for another.

          Here are some practical examples.

          • Audio compression (evening out the dynamic range between loud and quiet) is usually good for voices, but not good for music.
          • Male voices usually need different processing than female voices. There's even enough variety within each gender that two males (or two females) may sound best with different processing from each person.
          • One participant may have more background noise (or other interference) than anyone else. So you can reduce the noise on only their track and not have to process the others.

          Benefits to recording podcasts in a single track

          Single-track recording (even if you're treating stereo as single track) offers a lot of simplicity.

          1. Simple management and workflow

          When everything mixes down to a single track (mono or stereo), it's easy to route the audio appropriately.

          For example, using a multitrack interface may make it complicated for a remote participant or your live audience to hear everything being recorded. However, many multitrack interfaces offer a separate stereo-track mixdown of all the tracks. This is easier to manage when you have only one track.

          Editing in single track means far fewer files to manage and the processing is much simpler. Instead of separately processing several tracks, you have only one to process.

          2. More-affordable equipment

          It seems multitrack audio gear is always more expensive than single-track equivalents. For example, the Behringer UFX1204 16-track mixer is more than twice the price of the X1204USB 2-track mixer, even though they both have the same number of channels; the Mackie Onyx 1220i 12-channel mixer is nearly three times the cost of Mackie's VLZ and ProFX 12-channel mixers.

          There are even more advanced multitrack audio interfaces, offering USB 3.0 or Thunderbolt connectivity, and these can cost even more—$1,000 and up.

          Sticking with basic stereo/2-track recording works with most of the professional-quality audio equipment available and at much lower prices.

          3. Improved skills

          If you record all your participants and the soundtrack into the same track, you'll quickly discover you can't rely on editing to fix everything. To avoid capturing mistakes, your best option is to prevent the problems in the first place by improving your skills.

          • Fix crosstalk by learning to not interrupt each other and to share your thoughts effectively.
          • Fix coughs or other distractions by muting or moving away from the microphone.
          • Fix background noise by turning off noise-makers or moving away from them.

          Improving your skills will not only make your podcasts better and easier to edit, but it will also make you a far better communicator.

          Do you record in multitrack or single-track? What benefits or limitations have you discovered?

          Thank you for the podcast reviews!

          • Danny Stern (“Middleagecrank”), from Art Dealer Show, wrote in iTunes USA, “Must listen for both the novice and seasoned podcast vet. One year ago with nothing more than an itch to start a podcast of my own. I decided to binge on every podcast I could find that covered the topic. There are many indeed. And the value of them ranges greatly. But of all of them, you’ll never find one better researched, delivered and thoughtfully put together by someone who knows of what he speaks. And done by a good guy to boot. Now a year later I’m several episodes into my podcast Art Dealer Show and very grateful for the role this podcast took in getting me there. Thank you Daniel.”
          • Brad Hargis, from The Cinema Guys, wrote in iTunes USA, “Fantastic show and very informative. I'm very new to the world of podcasting and recently started a podcast, The Cinema Guys. After we recorded our first episodes I wanted to learn more about podcasting and work to make our show better. As I researched and came across many great shows, I found The Audacity to Podcast. It has been a great help with improving not only my podcast but inspiring me to work on creating more shows in the future. Thanks for the great episodes and keep up the awesome work!”

          Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

          Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

          Announcements

          Need personalized podcasting help?

          I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

          Ask your questions or share your feedback

          Connect with me

          Disclosure

          This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

          ]]>
          https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/why-and-why-not-to-record-podcasts-in-multitrack-tap286/feed/ 3 Multitrack recording keeps audio source separate. Here are some reason why you may and may not want to record your podcast in multiple tracks.
          The difference between channels and tracks

          Benefits to recording podcasts in multitrack
          1. Powerful editing
          2. Specific loudness adjustments
          3. Targeted processing

          Benefits to recording podcasts in a single track
          1. Simple management and workflow
          2. More-affordable equipment
          3. Improved skills

          Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

          Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

          Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/286

          FEEDBACK
          Call (903) 231-2221
          Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
          Send a voice message from http://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

          MAILING ADDRESS
          The Audacity to Podcast
          PO Box 739
          Burlington, KY 41005]]>
          Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 33:01 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/why-and-why-not-to-record-podcasts-in-multitrack-tap286/
          10 Ethical Tips to Monetize Your Podcast with Affiliate Marketing – TAP285 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/gKjKJZOh5wI/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/10-tips-to-monetize-your-podcast-with-affiliate-marketing-tap285/#comments Tue, 11 Oct 2016 13:55:41 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=11243 10-ethical-tips-to-monetize-your-podcast-with-affiliate-marketing-wide

          Whether you're podcasting for business or pleasure, promoting affiliate products and services can be a great way to monetize your podcast. Here are 10 tips to help you use affiliate marketing effectively.

          Before I talk about this, keep in mind that you don't have to monetize in order to profit from your podcast. I don't think monetization should ever be your primary focus, even for a commercial podcast. Nonetheless, bringing in some extra money can help you continue or improve your podcast.

          You probably won't get rich with affiliate income, but it can be a nice added benefit to give you a few extra dollars and better serve your audience.

          What is affiliate marketing?

          An affiliate program is where a company gives you a special link or code you can promote to your audience. When people take action with that link or code, you may earn a commission. These are usually based on a percentage of what the referral spends, anywhere from 1%–75%. But some programs do pay a flat rate for particular things.

          Affiliate programs are different from sponsorships. Nearly anyone can join affiliate programs (as long as you comply with their terms and maybe meet some basic requirements), but sponsorships are more targeted and carefully picked.

          “Affiliate marketing” may sound like a dirty term, but it really isn't. You are delivering extra value to your audience by recommending something of value, and you receive value in return. That's the ideal model.

          1. Seek to meet your audience's needs

          Your listener/viewer is most important in monetizing your podcast. If what you want to promote isn't relevant to your them, either by need or desire, then it's not worth whatever income you might earn.

          Get to know your audience to discover their needs. Ask them questions about their pain-points, what they enjoy, how they use your content, and such.

          You may think a particular affiliate program is a perfect fit for your audience, but they may not need it, want it, or be able to afford it.

          For example, the average listener to my Once Upon a Time podcast probably doesn't a way to watch the TV show, because they already do! They're also probably not interested in Internet-business products.

          When you meet your audience's needs with your recommendations (usually within relevant context), your audience will be far more likely to take action.

          2. Promote what you truly believe in

          When you promote something, it's a form of endorsement from your reputation. Companies know host-endorsed sponsorships are far more powerful than ad-insertions, and even preferred by the audience. So consider carefully whether you truly believe your audience will be well-served by what you're promoting.

          It's okay to use affiliate links to things you may not like (such as within comparisons or reviews). After all, not everyone will agree with your conclusion and your criticism may actually convince them why they want the thing you don't recommend.

          For example, I am an affiliate for a podcast-transcription service, just in case someone truly needs that, but I don't promote it. If you've been following me for longer than a couple months, then you probably know how negative I am toward podcast-transcriptions for show notes.

          You don't have to limit yourself to only what you've used, but try at least research anything you recommend, even if only to know the quality of the company enough to endorse new things they offer. For example, when Harry's sponsored one episode of The Audacity to Podcast, I got to try a Harry's razor and I compared it to a fresh razor from the company I had been using. That experience gave me personalize talking points that allowed me to be more effective. And in case you're wondering, yes, I'm still using and paying for Harry's razors because I truly believe in what I advertised.

          3. Become an ambassador

          Instead being merely a catalog of recommendations, promote the product or service as if it was your own or you had some vested interest in it.

          Here are some ideas:

          • Make a review and explain why you like the thing, especially why you like it more than alternatives.
          • Make tutorials showing how to use the product or service.
          • Create a landing page that educates your referral on their decision instead of merely pointing them to the product page.
          • Offer to help your audience with the decision or with the thing you recommend.
          • Create a bonus for high-value affiliate/joint-venture (JV) deals.

          Becoming an ambassador for your recommendations will help your audience make their decision, build further influence and authority for yourself, and possibly even open a relationship between you and the provider. For example, I now podcast with an Electro-Voice RE320 that was given to me by the company because they were familiar with my videos and endorsements.

          4. Make it relevant and get creative

          The two most-common affiliate-promotion techniques I hear are either fake-sponsorships (“This episode is brought to you by …,” which is legally questionable) or contextual recommendations (“buy this thing we're talking about at …”).

          Contextual recommendations will definitely be the most relevant to your audience. For example, when you're talking about a particular book, that's a perfect opportunity to promote your affiliate link for that book.

          You can also get creative with your promotions. You could have a special segment that promotes an affiliate, such as “what I'm listening to/reading/watching this week.” Or a “tool/tip/recommendation of the week.”

          Here are a couple examples (you're welcome to copy these).

          The featured podcaster microphone of this week is the Electro-Voice RE320. I use this microphone myself, and so do Dave Jackson from School of Podcasting and Stargate Pioneer from Better Podcasting. Tweet me if you use an RE320, as well! And if you would like to use this same great microphone, learn more about it and buy it through theaudacitytopodcast.com/re320 and that will help support the podcast.

          This tool of the week is TextExpander, suggested by John Doe. This is what he uses to save time entering simple and even complicated text into almost anything. When we looked at TextExpander, we can see why John and many others recommend it! Visit theaudacitytopodcast.com/textexpander to learn more, get your own copy, and even support the podcast at no extra cost to you! Thanks for the suggestion, John!

          5. Give simple calls to action

          If you're going to recommend a product ensure the process for your audience is as simple as possible. If you have to give instructions beyond visiting a simple URL or promo code, then try to simplify.

          For example, asking people to visit your website, find a banner in your sidebar, click or search for the product, and then purchase is too many steps. Instead, give them a simple and memorable URL and include it in your show notes.

          This is one reason I so-often recommend Pretty Link (Lite or Pro version). It's much easier for me and my audience if I say, “Try SiteGround's great web-hosting at theaudacitytopodcast.com/siteground.” Both free and paid versions of Pretty Link allow you to make those simple URL redirects (which should be 307 temporary redirects).

          If you have a lot of URLs or recommendations, then point your audience to your show notes for the appropriate links. For example, I say, “Visit theaudacitytopodcast.com/affiliatetips for the links to everything I just recommended” instead of overwhelming you with a dozen different links.

          6. Track each podcast's earnings separately

          Most affiliate programs allow you to add sites, campaigns, IDs, or other forms of tracking. This allows you to see which podcast or “brand” is earning income. This also means you don't have to create multiple affiliate accounts, which is especially nice with platforms like Amazon Associates where your percentage goes up when you refer more sales.

          I don't recommend that you get crazy making separate campaigns for every episode (unless the process is as simple as updating a URL). Start with tracking simply the separate podcasts or brands that you host.

          When I first started the Podcasting Deal Alerts newsletter, I made the mistake of using the same Amazon tracking ID as The Audacity to Podcast. Thus, after a very profitable holiday season, I had no idea whether that increase in profit was from the deal alerts. Now, I have a separate tracking ID for the deal alerts so I can see how profitable it is to my subscribers and to myself.

          7. Comply with laws, terms, and commonsense ethics

          Money makes things complicated. It's best for you to disclose when you'll be compensated for a recommendation. I know this can feel tricky because then your audience may think you're compromising your morals simply for a few dollars. That's where you must invest in building your authority, reputation, and influence. Also, how you promote the affiliate deal can also inspire or dispel suspicions.

          Furthermore, make sure you read the terms of your affiliate relationship. The most common things you need to know are where and how you're allowed to promote your affiliate relationship. With any affiliate link, it's reasonable to assume using your own affiliate link is against their terms and will get you kicked out.

          Also consider commonsense ethics. For example, don't promote illegal activities, don't promote adult things to an audience of minors, don't promote scams or marketing traps, and such.

          A potential affiliate approached me for my Once Upon a Time podcast with an offer that sounded like a perfect fit. We set up the agreement and when I tested the affiliate link, I was horrified to see the URL bounce through several questionable URLs (most of them blocked by my ad-blocker); and then the final landing page seemed like nothing more than an email-harvesting tool to add people to a marketing email list. That smelled like spam to me. I immediately ended that relationship and explained why.

          Your relationship with your audience is worth far more than money. Be very careful and respectful of that relationship and your own reputation.

          8. Simplify your processes

          Promoting and linking to different affiliates can start to get complicated. Here are the three best tools I recommend to simplify your own process.

          1. TextExpander—This can make linking to affiliates as quick as typing a short abbreviation. You can also do fancier things, like turning a standard URL into an affiliate URL.
          2. Pretty Link Pro—This is one of my favorite and most-valuable WordPress plugins. Not only does it allow for easy friendly-link creations (like /affiliate), but the Pro version can do more advanced things such as automatically hyperlinking keywords with your affiliate link (like this: Pretty Link Pro) and version 2 can dynamically redirect users based on their location (for example, theaudacitytopodcast.com/amazon takes USA visitors to the USA Amazon store, Canadian visitors to Amazon.ca, and so on).
          3. EasyAzon Pro—This is my favorite Amazon-affiliate link-maker for WordPress. Inserting an Amazon affiliate link into your WordPress content is as easy as pressing couple button and searching for your product—all without leaving WordPress! The links can even be internationalized so visitors in other countries will be taken to the relevant search results (or even directly to the product) in the Amazon store in their country.

          9. Remember your international audience

          Because podcasting is global and you probably have an audience outside your own country, ensure your affiliate links work for the majority of your international audience.

          Some promotions may be limited to only a particular country and can't be helped. Others may be available worldwide. And others, such as Amazon, may need to be localized.

          That's where Pretty Link Pro or EasyAzon Pro can make things much easier by allowing you to internationalize your links. For example, I might point you to /atr2100 to buy the Audio-Technica ATR2100-USB microphone. But in the United Kingdom, that microphone is twice the cost of the Samson Q2U, so I could make /atr2100 point UK visitors to equivalent microphone.

          10. Be patient

          Affiliate income is usually a slow build. When your content is timeless, every affiliate promotion has the potential to exponentially increase your income.

          Here's how that works. Assume that every episode you publish has one relevant affiliate link. With only one published episode, you get have one opportunity to earn money from each “podsumer” (my term for podcast-consumers). 50 episodes later and you have 50 times as many opportunities.

          Plus, any one of your old episodes could be found and inspire someone to purchase through your link.

          Here's another way to look at it. Assume each episode of your podcast earns $1 its first month, 50¢ the next, and 10¢ per month after that. With 50 published episodes, you could be earning $5 per month from episodes you already published in addition to what you earn from new episodes!

          Yes, you make get a wave of income with each new episode, but every wave still leaves continuing ripples.

          What has been most effective for you in using affiliate links? Comment below or tweet @theDanielJLewis.

          Thank you for the podcast reviews!

          • From the USA, TADAMS4U said, “I just discovered this podcast. I must say, I'm learning a lot. Great job and thanks for the info.”
          • Also from the USA, Robert (Qohelet1213), from Theology Simply Profound, said, “Excellent source for learning how to and sustaining your podcast. I first learned of this excellent resources just looking for help with Audacity as I was beginning a podcast for the first time for our church (Theology Simply Profound). Since then I've used this remarkable website and podcast for help with everything from audio quality to WordPress technical issues. Most of all, Daniel is just a great encouragement….thanks much.”

          Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

          Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

          Announcements

          Need personalized podcasting help?

          I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

          Ask your questions or share your feedback

          Connect with me

          Disclosure

          This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

          ]]>
          https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/10-tips-to-monetize-your-podcast-with-affiliate-marketing-tap285/feed/ 1 Whether podcasting for business or pleasure, affiliate marketing can be a great way to monetize your podcast. Here are 10 tips to help you use it effectively.
          1. Seek to meet your audience's needs
          2. Promote what you truly believe in
          3. Become an ambassador
          4. Make it relevant and get creative
          5. Give simple calls to action
          6. Track each podcast's earnings separately
          7. Comply with laws, terms, and commonsense ethics
          8. Simplify your processes
          9. Remember your international audience
          10. Be patient

          Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

          Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

          Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/285

          FEEDBACK
          Call (903) 231-2221
          Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
          Send a voice message from http://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

          MAILING ADDRESS
          The Audacity to Podcast
          PO Box 739
          Burlington, KY 41005]]>
          Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 44:36 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/10-tips-to-monetize-your-podcast-with-affiliate-marketing-tap285/
          How to Find Local Podcasters – TAP284 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/4KbxD6HdXhQ/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-find-local-podcasters-tap284/#comments Tue, 04 Oct 2016 13:36:53 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=11225 how-to-find-local-podcasters-wide

          Hanging out with other podcasters can be inspiring and profitable! Here are five tips to help you find and connect with other podcasters in your area.

          1. Search Google and iTunes

          This is probably already obvious. Search Google for things like “[city] podcast” or “[city] podcaster.” In iTunes or your favorite podcasts app, search for “[city]” and look for the podcasts that mention your city in the title, author tag, or description.

          Once you find them, visit their website or look inside their RSS feed for an email address or other contact information.

          2. Use Twitter Advanced Search

          When you use Twitter search, the two most important results you'll see will be accounts and tweets.

          Try searching Twitter for keywords like “[city] podcast” or “[city] podcaster.” You could even turn those words into hashtags. Remember to also try local abbreviations (for example, Cincinnati is often abbreviated to “Cincy”). Clicking on “Accounts” in the search results will show you the personal or brand profiles that match your search based on their location, bio, or name. Clicking on “Live” will show you tweets that match.

          These simple keyword-searches may already return plenty of results. To get more advanced filtering and results, try the Twitter Advanced Search. This lets you search specifically by location. You can also add this information to any Twitter search, for example, podcaster near:"Cincinnati, OH" within:15mi will search for any tweet or bio with the word “podcaster” and where the bio or the tweet's location is within 15 miles of Cincinnati. You can also use a zip code instead of a city name.

          I've used this method to find podcasters in “middle of nowhere” towns.

          3. Find or make Facebook groups

          Facebook can be a fantastic way to find and stay connected with local podcasters. The best thing to try is finding a group that may already exist for podcasters in your area. Make sure you search for the nearest well-known city or metropolis names and not only small towns.

          If you can't find a group, consider creating one to start connecting local podcasters with each other.

          4. Attend or host local events

          Local meetups may be your ultimate goal for finding local podcasters. It's possible such events already happen, so search Facebook events or sites like Meetup.com.

          Don't search only for podcasting-focused meetups. Blogger, entrepreneur, social-media, “YouTuber,” WordPress, and other types of meetups may be appealing to other podcasters and give you the opportunity to meet or event present around podcasting.

          If you can't find any such meetup, consider starting one yourself! It could be as simple as having a meal or drink together, or you could rent or borrow a space (such as a library or conference room) for training and structured discussions.

          5. Support your local podcasters

          When you find other podcasters in your area, help each other with shoutouts in your show, compiling a list on your website, cross-promotion, and encouragement.

          Try these methods and tell me how many podcasters you found near you! Comment below or tweet @theDanielJLewis with #LocalPodcasters.

          I found #LocalPodcasters I hadn't met before! Thanks, @theDanielJLewis!Click To Tweet

          Thank you for the podcast reviews!

            Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

            Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

            Announcements

            Need personalized podcasting help?

            I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

            Ask your questions or share your feedback

            Connect with me

            Disclosure

            This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

            ]]>
            https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-find-local-podcasters-tap284/feed/ 2 Hanging out with other podcasters can be inspiring and profitable! Here are five tips to help you find and connect with other podcasters in your area.
            1. Search Google and iTunes
            2. Use Twitter Advanced Search
            3. Find or make Facebook groups
            4. Attend or host local events
            5. Support your local podcasters

            Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

            Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

            Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/284

            FEEDBACK
            Call (903) 231-2221
            Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
            Send a voice message from http://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

            MAILING ADDRESS
            The Audacity to Podcast
            PO Box 739
            Burlington, KY 41005]]>
            Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 19:00 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-find-local-podcasters-tap284/
            Why You Should Stop Asking Your Audience for So Much – TAP283 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/1I-qV-rcKBQ/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/why-you-should-stop-asking-your-audience-for-so-much-tap283/#comments Tue, 27 Sep 2016 16:37:33 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=11208 why-you-should-stop-asking-your-audience-for-so-much-wide

            Podcasters tend to ask too much of their audience and often too soon. Here's why that could be hurting your podcast and how to overcome it.

            We commonly refer to things you ask your audience to do as “calls to action” (CTA). Here are some example podcasting calls to action:

            • Subscribe to the podcast
            • Send feedback
            • Leave a rating and review
            • Share the podcast
            • Join an email list
            • Visit the show notes
            • Follow on social networks
            • Buy from a sponsor or affiliate
            • Donate to the podcast

            None of these calls to action are bad in themselves. You have to examine your overall strategy with calls to action.

            So here is why you should stop asking your audience for so much.

            1. People need good reasons to give

            If I was a stranger to you, would you give me money if I asked for it? Your first response is probably something like, “It depends on how you ask,” or “It depends on why you need it.” Both of these and many other responses ask a core question: why?

            The relevance of the answer to “Why?” is what could inspire someone toward or deter them from further action. Consider my money-asking example. How would your likelihood to give change based on the following reasons?

            • I want to buy a lottery ticket.
            • I'm suffering from a disease and I can't afford the treatment.
            • My wallet is empty.
            • I have something you need or want.
            • I already gave you something valuable.
            • I can give it and more back to you.
            • I can use it to help someone you care about.

            Each of these are reasons, and how compelling they are to you depends on how well I make each reason relevant.

            For your podcast, answer “Why?” for each call to action. For example:

            • Why should someone send you feedback? Because you value their thoughts and want to share them in your podcast.
            • Why should someone donate to your podcast? Because you provide an experience they appreciate or enjoy, and their support enables you to continue and do more.
            • Why should someone visit your show notes? Because you have more valuable information and resources that will be easier for them to get from your show notes.

            Practice this with the example calls to action I shared above and come up with good and compelling reasons for someone to do any of them.

            2. You may not have given enough first

            I often hear podcasters start their episodes with one or several calls to action. Usually, it's sponsors, subscribe, rating and review, or send feedback.

            Your calls to action may be very important for both you and your audience. But putting this stuff first (called front-loading) actually makes it less important to your audience.

            The reason for this is the social psychology principle of reciprocity. Essentially, reciprocity is a feeling that you owe something to someone else because of what they've given you. Think about birthday or Christmas gifts. Don't you often feel like you need to give someone else a gift because they gave one to you?

            Reciprocity comes into play in podcasting when you give your audience what they want and they feel compelled to express their appreciation—to reciprocate.

            Whether your calls to action are for sponsors, feedback, subscriptions, reviews, or anything else. I suggest you seek to give—and give a lot—before you ask to receive.

            Hardly anyone dislikes a genuine giver. But most people dislike selfish takers.

            Whenever you want to ask for something from your audience, ensure you have given them enough first.

            3. Too many choices cause confusion

            Alvin Toffler created the term “overchoice” (also known as “choice overload”) in his 1970 book, Future Shock. The idea is that people will have a harder time making a decision when faced with too many choices.

            You've probably experienced this in your own life: grocery shopping, ordering from a restaurant menu, reading comparisons between products, and such. I think this thinking is why fewer people vote in the American primaries than in the election, and why elections generally have so few political parties.

            Think about this for your podcast. If you start asking people to subscribe and follow you on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, YouTube, Snapchat, iTunes, Google Play Music, Stitcher, and more, most people will be overwhelmed and probably not choose the one that's most important.

            This applies to your calls to action in both your podcast and on your website. How many subscription buttons do you have? How many social-sharing buttons are on each post? How many banners do you have in your sidebar?

            Repeating the same few choices is good. Offering too many choices is bad.

            There are so many things you want your audience to do that if you were to ask them all, your audience would probably do none of them.

            Here are some ways you can effectively reduce your calls to action.

            • Stop giving calls to action that no one ever does.
            • Narrow your calls to action to what's truly most important.
            • Create and promote funnels on your website or autoresponders on your email list that disperse your calls to action.
            • Rotate through calls to action across episodes. This is easier to do when you publish at least weekly.
            • Adjust your language so a call to action is no longer a request. For example, “Please subscribe to receive every episode automatically” is a request; “Thanks for subscribing so you can receive every episode automatically” sounds like something special to join.

            4. Your audience isn't on the same step with each other

            It's true that many people will binge-consume podcasts they love (and you'll see that in a podcast review I recently received). But you can't assume that everyone in your audience is at the same place in their fandom and understanding of your podcast. For example, asking your audience, in every episode, to subscribe or follow you on social networks could be wasting time for the majority of your audience who have already done so.

            Rotating through calls to action across episodes is one way to better reach your audience members who are on different steps. Pointing to funnels can be another way.

            Here's an example funnel:

            • Every podcast episode promotes joining an email list.
            • When people join the email list, you welcome them and give them something of value right away.
            • A week after they joined your email list, you ask them to subscribe to your podcast.
            • A week after that, you ask them for some feedback.
            • A week after that, you promote one of your best episodes or resources.
            • A week after that, you ask them to write a review for your podcast.
            • A week after that, you ask them to tell someone else about your podcast.

            This kind of funnel can be automated through autoresponders with an email service provider (such as MailChimp, Aweber, or ConvertKit) or on your website through special software or plugins that show things based on interactions with your site. You could also automate this on social networks with Buffer, SocialJukebox, or Edgar, but then everyone sees the messages instead of being led through a progression.

            When you can funnel your audience, you can help them take the right action one step at a time, instead of overwhelming them with things that may not matter, yet.

            Thank you for the podcast reviews!

            • leafbreeze said, “Everything you need to know. Daniel J. Lewis is a brilliant teacher that has created a resource for podcasters that has few equals. I discovered him as one of the guests on the Podcasters' Roundtable, and have since binge listened just about every episode I can get my iPod to hold. In just two weeks I have gone from noob to pro in everything from scheduling and show prep, to content creation tips and technical requirements. Daniel's manner, voice, and easy-to-follow advice makes it possible for anyone to create a podcast. If you're going to start a podcast — THIS IS WHERE YOU START! Thank you for putting this out into the world, Daniel! With your help, I'm now off to start my first podcast!”

            Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

            Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

            Announcements

            Need personalized podcasting help?

            I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

            Ask your questions or share your feedback

            Connect with me

            Disclosure

            This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

            ]]>
            https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/why-you-should-stop-asking-your-audience-for-so-much-tap283/feed/ 2 Podcasters tend to ask too much of their audience and often too soon. Here's why that could be hurting your podcast and how to overcome it.
            1. People need good reasons to give
            2. You may not have given enough first
            3. Too many choices cause confusion
            4. Your audience isn't on the same step with each other

            Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

            Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

            Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/283

            FEEDBACK
            Call (903) 231-2221
            Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
            Send a voice message from http://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

            MAILING ADDRESS
            The Audacity to Podcast
            PO Box 739
            Burlington, KY 41005]]>
            Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 29:30 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/why-you-should-stop-asking-your-audience-for-so-much-tap283/
            6 Ways Podcasters and Podcast-Fans Can Celebrate International Podcast Day in 2016 – TAP282 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/Hkdlg8OZJg8/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/6-ways-podcasters-and-podcast-fans-can-celebrate-international-podcast-day-in-2016-tap282/#comments Tue, 20 Sep 2016 13:39:15 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=11163 6-ways-podcasters-and-podcast-fans-can-celebrate-international-podcast-day-in-2016-wide

            International Podcast Day is September 30. Here's how to celebrate podcasting, whether you're a podcaster or a podcast fan!

            How podcasters can celebrate International Podcast Day

            Of course, we have a lot to celebrate. Podcasting may have enabled us to pursue our dreams, build lifelong relationships, enjoy new hobbies, and much more.

            1. Meetup with local podcasters

            Check Meetup.com, Facebook communities, and Twitter searches to find other podcasters in your area. Meetup for a meal, a snack, or simply to hang out and watch the International Podcast Day live stream.

            2. Do something live with your audience

            Consider an open Q&A, fan-appreciation day, or behind the scenes. Any way you can help your audience celebrate International Podcast Day with you.

            3. Submit your podcast for the Gratitude Award

            For the 2016 International Podcast Day Gratitude Award, your podcast will win based on global reach, as measured through international podcast reviews in iTunes. Get more details from the International Podcast Day website.

            How podcast-fans can celebrate International Podcast Day

            Celebrating podcasting isn't only for the podcasters, it's for the fans, too!

            4. Share your favorite podcasts with others

            Blog, post on social networks, email your friends, or tell anyone you meet about your favorite podcasts. Not only what they are, but how to subscribe and why they should.

            5. Support the podcasts and podcast apps you enjoy

            Podcasters need support. So if you truly appreciate the value you're getting week after week, put that gratefulness into action! Write a review, purchase their products, join their community, send a donation, mail a letter or fun item.

            And think about your podcast app. Consider the huge amount of life-changing value and connections you get through podcasts compared to what you get through TV. Is that worth $10 per year or whatever your preferred podcast app costs? (Hint: the answer is probably “YES!” That's why I'm a proud premium user of Overcast.)

            6. Try a new, niche podcast

            You may be loving the podcasts you listen to, and you see the popular articles recommend the popular podcasts. But I suggest you find a smaller, more niche podcast that hasn't received news coverage and doesn't have a big audience.

            For example, check out any of the “7 Great Podcasts You Probably Haven't Heard” I blogged about on my personal site.

            Many more ideas

            There are plenty of other ways to celebrate International Podcast Day on the site. However you celebrate, tag it with #PodcastDay.

            Also, listen to my 2015 episode with Steve Lee about how to celebrate International Podcast Day.

            Thank you for the podcast reviews!

            • Stephen, host of Heartland Running, said, “The perfect name. Thank you for this show Daniel. Your great advice did give me ‘The Audacity' to start my podcast. I had been wanting to start a podcast about running in the midwest for more than a year but didn't know how to go about it. Your show really did give me the confidence to finally launch Heartland Running Podcast. Thank you again.”

            Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

            Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

            Announcements

            Need personalized podcasting help?

            I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

            Ask your questions or share your feedback

            Connect with me

            Disclosure

            This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

            ]]>
            https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/6-ways-podcasters-and-podcast-fans-can-celebrate-international-podcast-day-in-2016-tap282/feed/ 1 International Podcast Day is September 30. Here's how to celebrate podcasting, whether you're a podcaster or a podcast fan!
            Learn more at http://InternationalPodcastDay.com

            1. Meetup with local podcasters
            2. Do something live with your audience
            3. Submit your podcast for the Gratitude Award
            4. Share your favorite podcasts with others
            5. Support the podcasts and podcast apps you enjoy
            6. Try a new, niche podcast

            Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

            Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

            Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/282

            FEEDBACK
            Call (903) 231-2221
            Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
            Send a voice message from http://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

            MAILING ADDRESS
            The Audacity to Podcast
            PO Box 739
            Burlington, KY 41005]]>
            Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 27:09 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/6-ways-podcasters-and-podcast-fans-can-celebrate-international-podcast-day-in-2016-tap282/
            Stop Obsessing over These 10 Podcasting Things – TAP281 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/K6LzojSUZac/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/stop-obsessing-over-these-10-podcasting-things-tap281/#comments Tue, 13 Sep 2016 15:50:22 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=11141 stop-obsessing-over-these-10-podcasting-things-wide

            Podcasters are often guilty of obsessive compulsive personality disorder (OCPD). It's okay to intently focus on important things, but here are ten podcasting things not worth the obsession.

            1. Launching

            Yes, your launch is important. I think it's good to make a “big splash” when you launch a new podcast. But I think too many people focus too much on the size of the “splash” and not enough on what they're actually throwing into the “water”!

            You'll see some supposed experts overhype the importance of iTunes “New & Noteworthy,” ratings and reviews, building a launch team, and having a specific launch day. None of these things are bad in themselves and each can help your podcast to some degree. But the amount of work you might put in obsessing over these things could be far better invested in going where your ideal audience is and building rapport.

            Stop obsessing over your podcast launch!Click To Tweet

            2. Your microphone

            “I listen to the podcast only because they have a great microphone,” said no one, ever.

            The purpose of a microphone is for people to be able to hear and understand you. “Decent” and understood is better than “perfect” and never launched.

            I know you want to sound your best. You may even have certain conditions (personal or environmental) that make finding the right microphone more difficult. But you must remember that you are your worst critic and your audience probably doesn't care as much as you do. After all, even a cheap microphone can sound good if you know how to use it!

            Stop obsessing over your podcasting microphone!Click To Tweet

            3. Minor distractions

            Outside noise, a microphone bump, a mispronounced word, or a verbal crutch can all be distractions for you or your audience, but they don't have to be! In fact, your audience will probably notice it less than you do, especially if you don't even acknowledge it.

            I'm referring to the minor distractions. The stuff that doesn't actually prevent you from being heard and understood. Holding a crying baby in your arms while you're podcasting is not a minor distraction, but a lawn mower outside might go unnoticed.

            Yes, there are plenty of things you can do to improve the quality of your audio, and plenty of ways that you can reduce or completely eliminate distractions. But don't make your distraction your audience's distraction. And don't let minor distractions prevent you from communicating your passion!

            Stop obsessing over minor podcasting distractions.Click To Tweet
            Don't let minor distractions prevent you from podcasting your passion!Click To Tweet

            4. Competition

            No matter your niche, you will have competition at some point. But competitive rivalry is based more in your beliefs than in reality.

            Competitive rivalry is based more in your beliefs than in reality.Click To Tweet

            I've struggled with rivalry before, and I sometimes still do! I would sometimes seethe while listening to a “competitor,” being critical about everything they say and how they say it. I would want to attack their success. I would want to write nasty iTunes reviews. I would want to expose their flaws.

            Disgusting, isn't it?

            There will always be competition, maybe even copycats, especially if you were first. Obsessing over competition will do nothing to inspire your audience. Instead, look for ways to collaborate with your “competition.”

            Obsessing over podcast competition will do nothing to inspire your audience.Click To Tweet
            Stop obsessing over #podcasting competition.Click To Tweet

            5. Negative feedback

            If you haven't received negative feedback, wait. You'll get your chance!

            Negative feedback can hurt. It can hurt your pride, your feelings, and how you handle it can even hurt your passions.

            Learn how to handle negative feedback. Sometimes, the negativity comes from people with negative lives. Sometimes, the negativity comes from someone who isn't your ideal audience. Sometimes, the negativity comes from someone you can't win back. And often, the negativity comes from a minority of your audience.

            That's not to say “negative” feedback is worthless. You can learn great things and discover weak spots you may never have seen yourself. But when you obsess over your negative feedback, you're only beating yourself up. Plus, you may be trying to change yourself for a very small number of people who have already left your podcast. Instead, improve things for the people you already have!

            Stop obsessing over negative podcast feedback.Click To Tweet

            6. Stats

            Let's be honest. How many times have you parked your browser on your podcast stats page and hit refresh every few minutes? I think we've all done it.

            It's certainly wonderful to see your podcast spreading. But remember that stats are merely numbers. Instead of trying to get those numbers up, what if you spent the same amount of time refreshing your feedback inboxes or building relationships with your audience? Then, 10 close relationships would be far more mutually valuable than 10,000 passively disconnected followers.

            Stop obsessing over your podcast stats. Focus on relationships!Click To Tweet

            7. Making money

            It's not often that people start a hobby with hopes or expectations to monetize. Yes, it's possible (certainly in exchangeable hobbies, like collecting). If you're podcasting for business, profit is absolutely important. But obsessing over monetary profit will never lead to success.

            Consider some of the greatest tech companies today: Apple, Google, and Microsoft. We know these companies not because of their income, but because of what they offer.

            Obsess over giving instead of getting.

            Obsess over giving instead of getting.Click To Tweet
            Stop obsessing over making money #podcasting.Click To Tweet

            8. The latest technologies

            Oh, how we love our podcasting toys! Microphones, mixers, cameras, processors, apps, and much more. I'm sure we could easily spend our entire incomes on nothing but podcasting technologies.

            There's certainly a place for upgrading your podcasting tools or trying new things, but chasing the latest interesting technologies is like a puppy chasing a butterfly. If you build your entire platform on the tool instead of using the tool to build your own platform, your empire could collapse literally overnight.

            Stop obsessing over the latest #podcasting technologies.Click To Tweet

            9. Rankings, ratings, and reviews

            You hear it often, and maybe do it yourself. Podcasters love ranking better and getting ratings and reviews, so they ask frequently.

            The truth many people (especially marketeers) don't realize is that these things don't work like they think they do. Ratings and reviews do not affect ranking. iTunes “New and Noteworthy” is not a ranking system. And these things don't have the power many people ascribe to them.

            Ratings and reviews are good for some things, like getting to know your audience and building social proof. In fact, your spread of global podcast reviews could help your podcast win the International Podcast Day Gratitude Award.

            But podcast rankings, ratings, and reviews are more reward and indication of what you're doing, they aren't the cause for your success.

            Stop obsessing over @iTunesPodcasts rankings, ratings, and reviews.Click To Tweet

            10. iTunes/directory listing

            An amazing thing about podcasting is how it opens many doors for you to list and syndicate your content through hundreds of popular podcast apps and directories. Each app and directory has its own uniqueness and popularity, but iTunes still dominates.

            I see many podcasters obsess over their directory listing. Their podcast search-engine optimization (SEO) isn't work as well as they expected, their listing isn't showing the correct information or displaying it in the way they want, or their latest episode hasn't displayed in the directory yet.

            Don't panic! There are several things you should know and check when your iTunes (or other) listing doesn't seem to be working. But you shouldn't obsess over it. As long as you can download your own episodes when you're subscribed to your own podcast, your audience probably can, too.

            Stop obsessing over your @iTunesPodcasts listing or update issues.Click To Tweet

            What podcasting things have you wrongly obsessed over?

            Thank you for the podcast reviews!

            • Inyang Effiong, from The Inyang Effiong Show said, “Good information and well organised. I just started listening to ‘The Audacity to Podcast' and the way each episode is organized around a theme and the consistent way information is makes it a good resource. I like the recent series on ideas and things to do to improve your podcast and have picked up a few tips – like using TV exposure to improve your chances with sponsors! I will be incooprating tips from this podcast into my podcast ‘The InyangEffiong Show' over at inyangeffiong.com.”

            Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

            Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

            Announcements

            Need personalized podcasting help?

            I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

            Ask your questions or share your feedback

            Connect with me

            Disclosure

            This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

            ]]>
            https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/stop-obsessing-over-these-10-podcasting-things-tap281/feed/ 3 Podcasters are often guilty of OCPD. It's okay to intently focus on important things, but here are ten podcasting things not worth the obsession.
            1. Launching
            2. Your microphone
            3. Minor distractions
            4. Competition
            5. Negative feedback
            6. Stats
            7. Making money
            8. The latest technologies
            9. Rankings, ratings, and reviews
            10. iTunes/directory listing

            Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

            Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

            Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/281

            FEEDBACK
            Call (903) 231-2221
            Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
            Send a voice message from http://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

            MAILING ADDRESS
            The Audacity to Podcast
            PO Box 739
            Burlington, KY 41005]]>
            Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 32:23 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/stop-obsessing-over-these-10-podcasting-things-tap281/
            Redirects and How to Use Them in Podcasting – TAP280 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/tgAPs4lkV8U/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/redirects-and-how-to-use-them-in-podcasting-tap280/#comments Tue, 06 Sep 2016 13:35:15 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=11121 What-Are-Redirects-and-How-to-Use-Them-Wide

            Learn about 301 and 307 redirects: what they are, which ones to use, how to make them, and how to use them effectively.

            Redirect types

            When data is requested through the Internet, it usually includes extra information in the header. This could help with caching, identification, and redirection. A “response code” is a three-digit number that corresponds to behavior or a result. For example, you're probably familiar with “404 error.” 404 is a response code that means “not found,” and it's what you would get if the data you're trying to load can't be accessed.

            When we talk about redirects by their numbers—301, 307, and such—we're referring to technical differences in the response codes and how those are interpreted.

            Here are what the most-relevant types of redirects do.

            300 “conditional” (my nickname)

            This is an interesting one you may have experienced without knowing it. A 300 redirect is offers multiple choices and redirects based on certain conditions. It's like telling the Post Office to split and forward your mail based on the recipient.

            For example, a 300 redirect could point visitors in the United States to one link, and visitors in the United Kingdom to another. Or, it could point Android users to one link but iOS users to another.

            Cool, right? This is quite technical to implement, but some plugins can do this for you on some level.

            301/308 permanent redirect

            This is the most common redirect you hear us talking about in podcasting. This redirect is permanent and cacheable. It's like telling the post office to forward all your mail and notify the sender of a change of address.

            Being a permanent redirect, any search-engine ranking for the old URL will be passed to the destination. Apps should eventually stop looking at the old URL and start looking at the new URL. If the apps don't update what URL they check, they do cache the destination URL. So if you changed where a permanent redirect goes, many apps might not follow it properly.

            301 and 308 are both permanent redirects. The difference is technical. Whereas a 301 redirect can be interpreted slightly differently with GET and POST, a 308 redirect resubmits the GET or POST based on the original request. 308 redirects don't support protocol changes, such as HTTP to HTTPS.

            Most of the time we refer to a permanent redirect, it's a 301, and that's the kind of permanent redirect you should probably use.

            302/303/307 temporary redirects

            Temporary redirects are common and we should probably use them more often that we do. (More on my recommendations later.) A 302, 303, or 307 redirect is temporary and not cacheable. It's like telling the post office to forward your mail to your vacation spot, but not notify anyone of a change of address.

            Being a temporary redirect, search-engine ranking for the old URL will not be passed to the destination. Apps will usually follow temporary redirections but won't update the URLs they check each time and won't cache the destination URL. Thus, whenever you change where a temporary redirect forwards, all apps should follow.

            The differences between 302, 303, and 307 temporary redirects are technical and similar to the differences between 301 and 308 permanent redirects. A 302 redirect was intended to be interpreted a particular way with GET and POST requests, but some apps forced one way or the other. Thus, the 303 and 307 redirects were created to remove the ambiguity. A 303 redirect forces a request as a GET (even if it was originally a POST), but a 307 passes it on in the same way it was requested.

            302 redirects are still supported for backward compatibility, but 307 is the ideal temporary redirect.

            304, 305, and 306

            These other redirects are most likely too technical for podcasters to have to know. 306 is deprecated and 305 uses a proxy (but isn't universally supported).

            304 “not modified” is the interesting one because it communicates that the destination data has not been changed since a date in the HTTP headers. Theoretically, this is ideal for RSS feeds as it would prevent a client from loading an entire RSS feed to find new data. Instead, a 304 redirect would allow the client to compare only the last-modified dates and only continue loading the data if the dates didn't match. However, this is rarely implemented in apps at this time.

            When to use each redirect type

            Maybe your head is spinning from all the different types of redirects, so here's what you need to know for making your decisions.

            Use 301 permanent for your URLs, SEO, and unchanging things

            Treat 301 redirects as permanently as possible (even though the Internet is always changing). You almost can't go wrong using 301 permanent redirects for stuff you own.

            Here are my recommendations for when to use a 301 permanent redirects.

            • Domain changes: http://olddomain.com ➜ http://newdomain.tv
            • Protocol changes: http://myawesomepodcast.com ➜ https://myawesomepodcast.com
            • Shortcuts for your own content: http://myawesomepodcast.com/100 ➜ http://myawesomepodcast.com/the-most-awesome-celebration-ever-episode-100
            • SEO rank passing for updated content: http://myawesomepodcast.com/why-feedburner-and-soundcloud-are-awesome ➜ http://myawesomepodcast.com/why-you-should-not-use-feedburner-or-soundcloud
            • URL/permalink structure changes: http://myawesomepodcast.com/page/about/contact ➜ http://myawesomepodcast.com/contact
            • RSS feed changes: https://feed.horrible-podcast-hosting.com/myawesomepodcast ➜ http://myawesomepodcast.com/feed/podcast

            Remember that a 301 redirect should only be used for what you intend to be permanent. Thus, I really don't recommend it for affiliates, other people's sites, live-streaming sites, and such. That's when you should use temporary redirects.

            Use 307 temporary for others' URLs and changing things

            Being temporary, 307 redirects are best for the things you know or suspect will change. You almost can't go wrong using 307 temporary redirects for stuff you don't own.

            Here are my recommendations for when to use a 307 temporary redirects. Any of these could change at any time, by you or by whoever owns the destination URL.

            • Affiliate URLs—the URL pattern may change, the company may change affiliate programs, or you may want to refer to a different store
            • Resources on someone else's site—they may change their URL structure, they may start or end an affiliate program, or you they may have updated something
            • Live-streaming services—unless you use your own /live page on your site, you may be redirecting to different services each week, or they may give you a different URL for each event, or you may even want to stop embedding the live on your own site and sending everyone to a service's site
            • Anything else that you can't control and that might change

            Because 307 redirects are temporary and uncached, an app or visitor should be properly redirected each time they access the URL.

            Where to make temporary and permanent redirects

            Depending on your needs, you may want to make your redirects at the server level, with a WordPress (or other content-management system) plugin, or in a file on your site.

            Server-side redirects

            If you're hosting on a server running Apache, most server-side redirects would be placed in a .htaccess file in your site root folder or through your control panel. If you're hosting on a server running Nginx, most server-side redirects would be placed in a .conf file inside or accessible to the Nginx configuration. Either of these support regular expressions for advanced redirecting.

            There are plenty of ways to do these, and they're easy to get wrong and break your website, so you may need to ask your hosting company for help.

            WordPress plugins

            I use and recommend Pretty Link Pro for easily making your own 301 and 307 redirects. This doesn't support very advanced stuff, but it's really easy to use and has great features (including location-based redirects in Pretty Link Pro 2.0, automatic keyword-linking, and more).

            For more advanced redirects, including regular expressions or exhaustive imports and exports, I recommend Redirection (free). This also works nicely to track and redirect page and post URLs you change. I've used this for redirect a large list of URL changes in one of my forums.

            And for some clever, alternative methods of redirecting, including easily redirecting an existing page or post, or for some clever support for your own affiliate program, try Quick Page/Post Redirect Plugin (free). I've used making AffiliateWP work with LeadPages for Podcasters' Society.

            Files on your site

            If you don't want to risk breaking your site and you can't use a plugin, you can create redirects inside of files on your site, but these may have to be named with .php (or another extension) at the end to be interpreted by your server.

            Guidance on using redirects

            For blogging and especially for podcasting, here are some of my general recommendations for using redirects.

            Don't go crazy

            Redirects are powerful, but they are also best when simple. You may not need a redirect for everything you link to on your website.

            Keep them simple

            If you are making redirects to speak in your podcast, ensure the redirects are short, unambiguous, easy to understand when heard, and easy to type. Avoid symbols, hyphens, underscores, and leading zeros.

            Be smart about numbers

            Since making redirects are free, it's okay to make multiple redirects for the same thing when you think there could be some confusion, such as whether numbers should be spelled out or used as numerals. Instead of complicating your call to action by explaining which way, simply make both ways to make it easy for your audience.

            Stay lowercase

            Although email addresses, domains, and top-level domains (.com, .net, .market, etc.) are case-insensitive, anything after the slash in a URL could be and probably is case-sensitive. Thus, /iTunes and /itunes may actually be different URLs on your server, especially a Linux server (which most of them are).

            The best thing is to use only lowercase for your URLs

            Say “slash”

            I have a small pet peeve over unnecessary redundancies (think about what “PIN number” or “ATM machine” really mean, unabbreviated). “Forward slash” is another redundancy. The opposite of “backslash” is simply “slash.” People are quite familiar with what a slash is. Think of common uses, such as “n/a,” “and/or,” “c/o,” “s/h,” “his/her,” and fractions like “1/4.” In each of these, people either pronounce the symbol as “slash,” or wouldn't pronounce it at all. Could you imagine someone saying, “and forward slash or”?

            Also, people know what button to press on their keyboards to get a slash. You really don't have to help them distinguish between a slash and a backslash. As they said in the 2001 Microsoft-depicting movie Antitrust, “Dust the colon and the backslash key! Only geeks use those keys.”

            Rarely use subdomains

            A subdomain would appears in a URL like this: http://subdomain.domain.tld.

            Subdomains are a way for your domain or server to easily run completely different software or even connect with a completely different server. They might work nicely for live.myawesomepodcast.com or store.myawesomepodcast.com, but they can also be confusing.

            Many people still wrongly assume domains require “www.” in them (that's actually a subdomain, too!). So if you use a subdomain for a redirect, they may still prepend it with “www.” and then land on a broken page.

            Point to valid, full URLs

            You may be able to create a redirect on your domain like /live, but the destination URL must be complete with the protocol (“http://” or “https://”). Some apps—such as browsers, WordPress, or Google apps—will assume a protocol, but that doesn't work for redirects. (how many times have you commented on a social network and your URL didn't become a link? This is why!)

            Bad: /live ➜ myawesomepodcast.com/live
            Good: /live ➜ http://myawesomepodcast.com/live

            You may be able to omit the domain if you're making an internal redirect, such as /live ➜ /live-page, but it's still a good practice to use full URLs.

            Have really good reasons for speaking several URLs

            When you can make your own redirects, it's really easy to throw them all over in your podcast. But be concise, especially in important calls to action. The best thing to do is point your audience to your show notes (with an easy URL!) for all your links and resources.

            Thank you for the podcast reviews!

            • Sven Brandsma (Seffen99), from the Netherlands and Praatje Podcast, said, “… In my case, the audacity to podcast literally gave me the guts to pursue my dream of starting my own podcast. And It happened! I now have a Dutch podcast for over a year now. I present it with my best friend who is the co-host. Our podcast is about Video Games, Movies, Music and Technology. It's called Praatje Podcast. Where “Praatje Pod” is kind of a Dutch synonym for small talk. Thanks you Daniel for all your wisdom, information and fun.”

            Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

            Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

            Announcements

            Need personalized podcasting help?

            I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

            Ask your questions or share your feedback

            Connect with me

            Disclosure

            This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

            ]]>
            https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/redirects-and-how-to-use-them-in-podcasting-tap280/feed/ 7 Learn about 301 and 307 redirects: what they are, which ones to use, how to make them, and how to use them effectively.
            Support The Messengers: A Podcast Documentary! https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/themessengers

            Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

            Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

            Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/280

            FEEDBACK
            Call (903) 231-2221
            Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
            Send a voice message from http://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

            MAILING ADDRESS
            The Audacity to Podcast
            PO Box 739
            Burlington, KY 41005]]>
            Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 45:43 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/redirects-and-how-to-use-them-in-podcasting-tap280/
            What Makes Podcasting More Intimate than Other Media – TAP279 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/P53Q3gTNpso/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/what-makes-podcasting-more-intimate-than-other-media-tap279/#comments Tue, 30 Aug 2016 13:31:13 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=11100 What-Makes-Podcasting-More-Intimate-than-Other-Media-Wide

            Podcasting connects with people in more personal—even more intimate—way than blogging, radio, video, and more. Here are 8 things that make podcasts different.

            1. Being authentic

            There's a realness to podcasting that you don't get anywhere else. Writing is often edited. Video has a lot of production to it. Radio is very rigid. And similar issues exist with many other media.

            You may watch every episode of your favorite TV show, but do you feel like you truly know the people you see on screen? Probably not, because what you see is an act.

            Most of what people share in podcasting is their authentic selves. “Authenticity” is about being real, not about being fully transparent (especially not overly transparent).

            2. Speaking directly to individuals

            Most TV and movie content doesn't speak directly to the audience. Radio gets close, but since radio is live, the hosts often speak to a mass audience with terms like “all of you.” Plus, you probably never hear an audience member named unless they call in at that time.

            Podcasts are different. They are almost always consumed via download within a short time after they were recorded and published. Even if a podcast has millions of listeners, most people listen by themselves, not surrounded with fellow fans. Thus, speaking to the listener as an individual makes it feel more intimate.

            3. Building relationships

            Good relationships are built on trust, and authenticity creates that. Not only will your audience feel like they know you, but they will often get to know you personally through various levels of engagement—social-network conversations, in-person events, direct correspondence, and such.

            When your talk directly to your audience, and they're listening by themselves, it's easy for a small personal connection to mature into a relationship at varying levels.

            4. Publishing consistently

            You may hear bad husband joke, “I told my wife I loved her when I married her, so if anything changes, I'll let her know.” But I'm sure you know the importance of consistently reinforcing your love and commitment for each other. (In fact, here's a fun test. Ask your wife if she would rather have a dozen roses today, or one rose per week for the next twelve months. What about saying, “I love you,” seven times today versus saying it every day this week?)

            Consistency is key to any form of “intimacy.” Friends who don't stay connected with each other often drift apart. Spouses who don't spend consistent quality time with each other usually feel neglected.

            Because of the time-shifted nature of podcasts, it's easy for people to structure aspects of their lives around a podcast's release schedule, or to form regular patterns to their week. For example, I see and listen to episodes of School of Podcasting, She Podcasts, or Libsyn's The Feed every Monday morning. If they weren't consistent, my Mondays wouldn't feel the same. Likewise, one of my all-time favorite podcasts (That Story Show) is on hiatus, and now my lawn-mowing is not as enjoyable.

            These daily or weekly routines start to establish a deeper connection with each new episode.

            5. Taking content everywhere

            Because podcasts are consumed primarily via download, most people can take those episodes with them everywhere, thanks to the proliferation of smartphones and other mobile devices. Audio consumption significantly trumps video consumption because we can listen in more places than we can watch or read. Many people will listen while driving, mowing, cooking, cleaning dishes, folding laundry, working at their jobs, and even using the restroom! These are places other conversations are either impossible or unwelcome.

            6. Engaging with real people

            Although podcasts can certainly engage with inflated personalities (especially in business-related interview shows), a lot of podcasts bring real conversations with real people. That could come through an interview, a cohosted conversation, or even the interaction you have with your audience.

            You'll rarely hear radio shows refer to the same listener multiple times. But you hear this often in podcasts. Because of the more social nature of podcasts and the community around them, it's also possible for your audience to know each other.

            Podcasting doesn't require a degree in broadcasting or any kind of professional training (although that can certainly help your communication skills!). Thus, many podcasters tend to be on the same level as their audience. More than authenticity, this makes you relatable as people see how much you are like them.

            7. Connecting through social media

            Podcasting is deeply connected with social media. Facebook, Twitter, and many other social networks are foundational to podcast engagement and growth. Many would even categorize podcasting as social media instead of broadcasting. This makes podcasting inherently more social (“us together”) than a broadcast medium built on broadcasting ideas (“me to many”).

            8. Focusing on the niches

            I'll take a risk and say that no great relationship starts like this, “Do you like breathing oxygen? ME, TOO! Let's be best friends!”

            It's the narrow similarities that make deeper connections—in another word, the niche. The more niche interests you share with another person, the easier it is to connect with them (despite other differences).

            Max Flight said this in Podcasters' Society:

            I think one factor driving the intimacy of podcasts is that many have a narrowly focussed topic and target audience. In that environment, the producers and the consumers share a very specific interest. The conversations that result are thus more meaningful to those participating.

            What makes podcasting and listening to podcasts intimate for you?

            Thank you for the podcast reviews!

            • DivineYoganista, from Canada, said, “Value Packed & Well Produced. Definitely worth the listen if you're a podcaster! I also subscribed to Daniel's email list and I've been getting a lot of super useful tips to get reviews on my new podcast. I'm brand new to podcasting and I feel that I'm in good hands with Daniel. Can't wait to dive into the archives, Thanks Daniel, you rock!”

            Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

            Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

            Announcements

            • Did you miss “What You Must Know about the Law and Your Podcast” with Gordon Firemark? It's now available exclusively to members of Podcasters' Society!

            Need personalized podcasting help?

            I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

            Ask your questions or share your feedback

            Connect with me

            Disclosure

            This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

            ]]>
            https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/what-makes-podcasting-more-intimate-than-other-media-tap279/feed/ 2 Podcasting connects with people in more personal—even more intimate—way than blogging, radio, video, and more. Here are 8 things that make podcasts different.
            1. Being authentic
            2. Speaking directly to individuals
            3. Building relationships
            4. Publishing consistently
            5. Taking content everywhere
            6. Engaging with real people
            7. Connecting through social media
            8. Focusing on the niches

            Get the help, accountability, and training you need to grow your podcast from average to amazing! https://PodcastersSociety.com/

            Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

            Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/279

            FEEDBACK
            Call (903) 231-2221
            Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
            Send a voice message from http://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

            MAILING ADDRESS
            The Audacity to Podcast
            PO Box 739
            Burlington, KY 41005]]>
            Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 31:54 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/what-makes-podcasting-more-intimate-than-other-media-tap279/
            Creative Solutions to Podcasting Problems – TAP278 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/CuKrv3yjXJQ/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/creative-solutions-to-podcasting-problems-tap278/#comments Tue, 23 Aug 2016 14:14:20 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=11078 How-to-Creatively-Fix-Podcasting-Problems-Wide

            Concluding the series on fixing common podcasting problems, here are ways others have creatively solved problems they faced with their podcasts.

            Making interesting openings

            Colleen Mullen from Coaching through Chaos and Shrink 2 Shrink.

            1. Avoid saying the same thing in your episode openings.
            2. Engage your audience right away.

            Getting sponsors

            Maurice Cherry from Revision Path.

            1. Only go after sponsors you actually use.
            2. Convince sponsors on the value of your show and that it matches their value.

            Appearing on TV and interviewing popular guests

            Stephan Spencer from Marketing Speak and Optimized Geek

            1. Call TV producers with a timely proposal (ideally with local relevance).
            2. Incorporate props into your segment.
            3. Create a media page with your TV appearances.

            Learn more about “Becoming a Celebrity through TV Appearances” from Stephan's podcast. Plus, download and learn from Stephan's TV segment proposal (PDF).

            Reducing reverb

            1. Use a mirror to find the places that reflect directly into your mic.
            2. Reduce flat surfaces.
            3. Hang multiple layers of blankets or towels.
            4. Build your own acoustic panels.

            Telling stories

            Alex Blumberg from Startup and Gimlet Media.

            1. Practice.
            2. Experiment.
            3. Test on others to see how it works.

            Thank you for the podcast reviews!

            • General Snobbery said, “This is a podcast that demonstrates podcasts at their best. Podcasts, above all, are here to help us. Here's a podcast geared entirely toward helping others. No ivory tower, no ego – simply a kind, intelligent man spreading quality information. Thank you, Mr. Lewis!”

            Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

            Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

            Announcements

            Need personalized podcasting help?

            I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

            Ask your questions or share your feedback

            Connect with me

            Disclosure

            This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

            ]]>
            https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/creative-solutions-to-podcasting-problems-tap278/feed/ 2 Concluding the series on fixing common podcasting problems, here are ways others have creatively solved problems they faced with their podcasts.
            - Making interesting openings
            - Getting sponsors
            - Appearing on TV and interviewing popular guests
            - Reducing reverb
            - Telling stories

            Register for my free webinar with Gordon Firemark, "What You Must Know about the Law and Your Podcast": https://PodcastersSociety.com/

            Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

            Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/278

            FEEDBACK
            Call (903) 231-2221
            Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
            Send a voice message from http://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

            MAILING ADDRESS
            The Audacity to Podcast
            PO Box 739
            Burlington, KY 41005]]>
            Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 38:34 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/creative-solutions-to-podcasting-problems-tap278/
            How to Fix Common Podcast Interview Problems – TAP277 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/YtHS4JOXzTI/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-fix-common-podcast-interview-problems-tap277/#comments Tue, 16 Aug 2016 13:25:20 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=11053 How-to-Fix-Common-Podcast-Interview-Problems-Wide

            Interviews can create good content and share powerful stories across all media. Podcasting is full of interviews with problems, here's how to fix them.

            Before anything, respect your guest

            Regardless of whom you interview, make it easy for them! Don't give them a multipage checklist or require them to do complicated things to be on your podcast. Whatever problems you face, remember to respect your guest, their time, and choose wisely what is really worth inconveniencing your guest to fix or prevent.

            1. Poor audio quality

            Unless you're interviewing other podcasters, it's very likely that your guest is not as passionate and knowledgeable about audio quality as you are.

            Before I help you understand and fix poor audio quality, you should know that content and presentation are far more important than production. As long as people can hear, understand, and get value from what your guest says, your guest's audio doesn't have to be as good as yours. In fact, most people will forgive lower audio quality from your guest, but expect higher audio quality from you.

            The following three things affect your guest's audio quality the most, even more than the particular technology they use.

            Mic technique

            Ensure your guest knows how to use a microphone. Generally, this means doing only three things: talk into the mic, stay a consistent distance away (a fist-width away is usually ideal), and don't touch the mic or anything connected to it.

            Thus, instead of their using their computer and it's built-in mic, consider suggesting they connect with you over their smartphone (via Skype, or whatever tool you use). The reason for this is smartphone mics are often pretty good, especially when they remain a consistent and short distance from the voice.

            Environment

            Ensure your guest is in a quiet and low-reverb space for recording. This should also be somewhere with a good Internet or cellular connection (wired is best if talking over a telephone line or a computer).

            Processing

            This responsibility is yours. Regardless of the technology you use to communicate with and record your guest, you will probably need a little audio processing afterward. Usually, the only things you need are loudness normalization (to get your guest's volume level to match yours) and maybe compression (to reduce the difference between loud and quiet spots).

            Other considerations

            If your guest is more tech-savvy or willing to try better things, consider more advanced call-recording solutions such as Cast, Zencastr, or Ringr.

            2. Scheduling

            Getting availabilities to align can be almost as hard as aligning the planets! But here are some general tips for fixing scheduling problems.

            • Suggest specific times—Even if you have a scheduling system, it may be most convenient for your guest if you simply suggest a couple specific times that you know will work.
            • Always use time zones—Your guest might be anywhere in the world, so always ensure you're talking about the same time. If you know their location, it may be best to speak according to their time zone, but still include the time zone in case they are traveling. (Sidenote and pet peeve: American time zone abbreviations change with Daylight Saving Time, and so do GMT/UTC offsets. So make sure you're either using the correct abbreviation—such as “EDT” versus “EST”—or keep it universal—such as “ET” or “Eastern Time.”)
            • Prioritize your guest's schedule—Unless you're famous, be flexible to accommodate your guest instead of forcing them to fit your schedule, especially for really important guests.
            • Use a scheduling system—Avoid the back-and-forth emails with trying to pick a schedule. Use a tool like Appointlet, ScheduleOnce, Calendly, or one of the many other online-scheduling tools that make it as easy as possible for your guest to pick a time that works for both of you. Remember to make it easy and simple. Don't force them to create an account or complete a long form!

            3. Introductions

            “Tell me about yourself” communicates one unfortunate thing about you: you're lazy. (I know that probably hurts a little. Please hear me out.)

            As a interviewer, a guest, and a listener, I think it shows far more respect and communicates more relevance when you are the one who introduces your guest. And you do so without merely reading their bio.

            This means you need to do at least a little research on your guest. The better you know them, the better you can introduce them.

            Another common problem I hear in podcast interviews is a double introduction. The host will often pre-record the interview with an introduction in it, and then they record their episode opening with an introduction in it, too. Consider whether what you're saying leading into the interview is redundant with the interview's opening itself. Sometimes, this may mean removing whatever introduction you recording into the interview.

            4. Weak questions and answers

            The burden of a quality interview rests on you, not on your guest. I recently heard an interview with Gary Vaynerchuck, who has all kinds of amazing insight and value to give. But the interview was horrible! It wasn't Gary's fault, it was the interviewer's fault.

            • Research your guest and their industry—Ask questions you know your guest will be good at answering. You may get ideas based on other interviews or things they've been doing lately. Those ideas could be for questions to ask, to avoid, or quality questions no one else has asked them.
            • Avoid questions that lead to simple yes/no answers—”Does,” “did,” and “are,” at the beginning of your questions are usually signs of yes/no question.
            • Don't try to be the expert with your questions—Let your guest fill in the details, especially if you know the answers.
            • Don't force your outline—Some questions will be irrelevant to your guest, or they may have already answered the question.
            • Listen—This was Marc Maron's single-word advice from Podcast Movement 2015. Listen to everything your guest says and communicates through their emotions and you may discover more value than you ever anticipated.

            Unless your guest is an expert interviewee and decides to work harder than you in the interview, the general rule is bad questions lead to bad answers.

            5. Legal issues

            How are you protecting yourself and your podcast if your guest doesn't like their interview, you don't use the interview, or some other issue comes up? You really should have a legal release form your guest signs (not only records verbal acceptance) before you record. This should cover some basic things:

            • Compensation—Will they get paid? What if you later charge for this episode or make a product from it?
            • Release—What are they letting you do with their recording, their imagery, and the content they share? Do they have rights over their episode?

            There are more legal issues about podcast interviews that you need to consider. In fact, there are big legal issues all around podcasting! That's why I'm thrilled to have entertainment lawyer Gordon Firemark as my guest in a free webinar on Thursday, August 25 at 3:00 pm (EDT/GMT-4)! We'll discuss copyrights, trademarks, releases, contracts, and more! Click here to register for the free webinar. (A free replay will be available for a limited time afterward before the webinar is exclusive to members of Podcasters' Society.)

            6. Irrelevant value

            People live interesting lives, and you may bring some of that out in your podcast. But does that really matter to your audience? If you're going to get off-topic (or spend too much time getting to know your guest), I suggest you move that to the end of the interview (even if through editing) or save it for an opt-in bonus.

            I'm not saying that content has no value—it could be even more value than the interview itself! But is that value relevant to your audience? Maybe, or maybe not. That's for you to decide.

            7. Wasted words

            Remember that, generally, bad questions lead to bad answers. But even good questions may return wasted words.

            Wasted words could be on your guest's part as they are forming their answer in their mind. They may also be wasted because they're giving a verbose answer to a simple question.

            You could also be wasting words by asking unnecessarily complex questions or giving possible answers in your questions.

            Much of this can be removed in editing, but it's far better to refine your skills so you won't have to edit later.

            8. Bad or no transitions

            An outline is great for keeping a structure to your content. But don't be so rigid with that outline that you have bad transitions or no transitions whatsoever.

            For example, a guest could end their response with, “and that's when I discovered I have cancer and only three months left to live,” and then you, focused on your outline, say, “How did you grow your business?”

            This goes back to Marc Maron's advice, “LISTEN!” Listen to what your guest says more than you focus on your outline. Listen for followup questions. Listen for potential transitions.

            Erik K. Johnson, from Podcast Talent Coach, often points out that no one says, “And now it's time for …” in real conversations.

            Transitioning well is a skill that takes practice.

            What podcast interview problems have you faced, and how have you fixed them?

            Thank you for the podcast reviews!

            • Zach (“1peter[spp-timestamp time="2:24"]” on iTunes), from HearSpurgeon.com, said, “Favorite Podcast about Podcasting! I listened to a handful of podcasting podcasts when I was starting up my own podcast a few months ago. Daniel's is the only one I still listen to regularly. He provides the most value-per-minute with clear, easy to understand, thoughtfully laid out content. He also talks just enough about his own life and beliefs that I feel I can get to know the man behind the mic, which I rather enjoy 🙂 Thank you, Daniel, for holding this toddler podcaster's hand and teaching me the ropes.”

            Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

            Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

            Announcements

            Need personalized podcasting help?

            I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

            Ask your questions or share your feedback

            Connect with me

            Disclosure

            This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

            ]]>
            https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-fix-common-podcast-interview-problems-tap277/feed/ 3 Interviews can create good content and share powerful stories across all media. Podcasting is full of interviews with problems, here's how to fix them.
            1. Poor audio quality
            2. Scheduling
            3. Introductions
            4. Weak questions and answers
            5. Legal issues
            6. Irrelevant value
            7. Wasted words
            8. Bad or no transitions

            Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

            Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

            Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/277

            FEEDBACK
            Call (903) 231-2221
            Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
            Send a voice message from http://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

            MAILING ADDRESS
            The Audacity to Podcast
            PO Box 739
            Burlington, KY 41005]]>
            Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 52:04 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-fix-common-podcast-interview-problems-tap277/
            How to Fix Common WordPress Problems – TAP276 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/C7Q5S5hg2nE/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-fix-common-wordpress-problems-tap276/#respond Tue, 09 Aug 2016 14:06:55 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=11030 How-to-Fix-Common-WordPress-Problems-Wide

            WordPress is the best platform for blogging and podcasting. And with so many parts, something could break. Here is how to fix the most common problems you may face with WordPress.

            The common WordPress troubleshooting steps

            Review the “11 WordPress Troubleshooting Tips” (#226, /wptroubleshooting) I have previously shared:

            1. Backup
            2. Consider hiring help
            3. Trace the problem logically and linearly
            4. Test with “incognito” and other browsers
            5. Revert changes
            6. Deactivate WordPress plugins
            7. Try a default WordPress theme
            8. Optimize performance (and clear the caches)
            9. Ask your web host
            10. Tighten security
            11. Hire help

            The most commonly successful steps are to clear (or disable) caching or deactivate plugins.

            Review the official “Common WordPress Errors” resources

            Most of the common problems you'll face are already addressed by the WordPress team:

            • The White Screen of Death—You visit your front-end or back-end and the screen is blank and white
            • Internal Server Error—Also called “error 500”
            • Error Establishing Database Connection
            • Failed Auto-Upgrade
            • Connection Timed Out—Stuff takes a really long time to load and may eventually give up
            • Maintenance Mode Following Upgrade
            • You Make Changes and Nothing Happens
            • Pretty Permalinks 404 and Images not Working—Also called “page not found”
            • Custom Post Type 404 Errors—Also called “page not found”
            • Specific Error Messages

            Numbers appended to URLs or a slug/URL is already taken

            A “slug” is a section of a URL usually after the domain and usually between slashes. For example, TheAudacitytoPodcast.com/this-is-a-slug/. WordPress makes a slug for most content (pages, posts, products, pretty links, and custom post types) and taxonomy (tags, categories, and some other taxonomy for custom post types).

            With few exceptions, these slugs must be unique. Thus, if you have two items with the same name, WordPress will usually append a number to the slug to prevent duplicates.

            This is also why you may have trouble making a /podcast URL with PowerPress installed, but there's a workaround.

            To avoid duplicate slugs, you may need to check your pages, posts, categories, tags, and other plugins to delete or rename anything already using the same slug (for example, I recommend you make your category slug “podcast-episodes” or “audio-podcast” instead of “podcast”).

            Some URL-creating plugins, such as Pretty Link, may be more sensitive to pre-existing slugs. In fact, I discovered and reported a bug in a version of one such plugin where it would not allow a new slug to end with anything the same as another slug (for example, you can't make “/mypodcastfeed” because “/feed” was already used).

            Stuff doesn't update

            In addition to WordPress's own recommendation for clearing your browser cache (under “You Make Changes and Nothing Happens”), you may need to clear or disable your website cache, as well. Remember that there may be multiple layers to clear or disable, such as WordPress cache, server cache, and external/CDN cache (like CloudFlare).

            Thank you for the podcast reviews!

            • 5 stars in iTunes by Sleep with Silk from USA on June 7, 2016: “… His information has assisted us greatly to improve our “Sleep with Silk” podcasts. Daniel's tips have allowed us to create better podcasts to help our stressed and sleepless listeners to relax and fall asleep easier to nature sounds, calming voices, background noise, and binaural beats. He is also enthusiastic and engaging – so he won't put you to sleep like our podcasts will! …”

            Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

            Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

            Announcements

            • Thank you for your patience while I was absent with illness and a death in my extended family.
            • Support The Messengers, an upcoming podcast documentary.

            Need personalized podcasting help?

            I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

            Ask your questions or share your feedback

            Connect with me

            Disclosure

            This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

            ]]>
            https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-fix-common-wordpress-problems-tap276/feed/ 0 WordPress is the best platform for blogging and podcasting, but it can break sometimes. Here is how to fix the most common problems you may face with WordPress.
            Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com

            Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com

            Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/276

            FEEDBACK
            Call (903) 231-2221
            Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
            Send a voice message from http://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

            MAILING ADDRESS
            The Audacity to Podcast
            PO Box 739
            Burlington, KY 41005]]>
            Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 40:14 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-fix-common-wordpress-problems-tap276/
            Podcasting Lessons from a Sabbatical, Personal Rebranding, and Podcast Movement 2016 – TAP275 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/13gc5Xpu-S4/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/podcasting-lessons-from-a-sabbatical-personal-rebranding-and-podcast-movement-2016-tap275/#comments Tue, 12 Jul 2016 14:57:45 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=10974 Podcasting-Lessons-From-Wide

            Podcasting encouragement and tips about taking breaks, refocusing, saying “no” so you can say “yes,” and Podcast Movement 2016.

            Until I write thorough show notes, please listen to the episode to hear my thoughts.

            Thank you for the podcast reviews!

              Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

              Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

              Need personalized podcasting help?

              I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

              Ask your questions or share your feedback

              Connect with me

              Disclosure

              This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

              ]]>
              https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/podcasting-lessons-from-a-sabbatical-personal-rebranding-and-podcast-movement-2016-tap275/feed/ 4 Podcasting encouragement and tips about taking breaks, refocusing, saying "no" so you can say "yes," and Podcast Movement 2016.
              Until I write thorough show notes, please listen to the episode to hear my thoughts.

              Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

              Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

              Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/275

              FEEDBACK
              Call (903) 231-2221
              Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
              Send a voice message from http://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

              MAILING ADDRESS
              The Audacity to Podcast
              PO Box 739
              Burlington, KY 41005]]>
              Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 42:14 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/podcasting-lessons-from-a-sabbatical-personal-rebranding-and-podcast-movement-2016-tap275/
              How to Fix Common Podcast Presentation Problems – TAP274 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/QeTRYr6P2dU/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-fix-common-podcast-presentation-problems-tap274/#comments Tue, 21 Jun 2016 13:00:00 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=10916 How-to-Fix-Common-Podcast-Presentation-Problems-Wide

              Whether you podcast alone or with others, presentation problems can hinder effective communication and slow your podcast growth. Here are some solutions to common presentation problems.

              Filler words

              It's okay to say “um,” “like,” “ya know,” and other such fillers. But your presentation will drastically improve if you can reduce or completely remove these. Here are the three biggest ways to stop using these filler words.

              1. Be prepared. The more you have planned, prepared, and practiced, the more clearly and confidently you'll present.
              2. Don't slow down (or speed up). Speed is almost irrelevant in effective communication. Some people mess up more when they talk quickly, some mess up more when they talk slowly. Speak at the speed that is natural for you and fitting for your content.
              3. Pause. A pause … is one of the most powerful things in communication. A pause can create anticipation, allow for mental digestion, punctuate humor, and more. Pauses may not always occur where there would be punctuation, and vice versa.

              Distractions

              Even the best presenters and conversationalists will sound horrible if they're distracted. The solution is more than “don't get distracted” (although that is the general idea)! Here are some tips for dealing with distractions.

              1. Focus when you need to. If it's time for you to speak, focus on what you're saying. This is not the time to try reading something else while you're trying to speak.
              2. Make times to be distracted. I think our brains need some distractions every now and then. So it's okay to have them, but allow them at only designated times. It's far easier to edit out awkward silences than to edit together a distracted presentation.
              3. Don't allow interruptions. If you have something to say, say it without interrupting yourself! This is especially important for live-streaming. Every comment in the chat room could not only be distracting but also an interruption. If you have guests or cohosts, learn how to not interrupt each other except when appropriate.
              4. Don't try to do too much. Multitasking is horrible for our brains and our tasks. If it's too distracting for you to manage a chat room and listen to your cohost, ignore the chat room! If you can't reasonably live-stream while recording your presentation, don't live-stream!
              5. Deal with, delegate, or dump. Some things can continue being distractions until we process them in some way. You might have to take a moment to deal with the distraction (such as a troll in your live show or an interrupting child), you might have to delegate the distraction to someone else (like running your mixer or camera), or you might have to dump the distraction altogether.

              Short responses

              Conversations feel like they come to abrupt and awkward halt when you receive a short response. This could be from either a cohost or from an interviewee.

              1. Ask open-ended questions. Avoiding “yes or no” questions usually requires thinking, but it allows the other person to demonstrate their expertise and demonstrates your own ability to converse. For example, instead of asking, “Did you like the movie?” Ask, “What did you think of the movie?”
              2. Make the question shorter than the response. Don't waste words in building up a massive question. Not only can this be confusing for the other person, but it can also lead to an extremely short answer (or wasted words).
              3. Warm up before passing the conversation. Your other participant (a cohost or interviewee) may not know when you want them to speak. Ensure you don't surprise them with a sudden pass of the conversation to them. Body language is very helpful for this, if you can see it.
              4. Speak to encourage dialog. When you say everything that could be said on a matter, you close the conversation to extra input. Leave it open and leave some stuff unsaid so others can participate, too. This allows others to say more than an awkward, “yup.”

              Wasted words

              It's easy to waste words, especially when the conversation passes between people. Here are some tips to help you not waste words.

              1. Speak when you have something to add. When someone says something you like, it's easy to fall into repeating what they said as your form of agreement. But seek to add value to the content with each response.
              2. Think before you speak. A lot of words get wasted while you are trying to think of a response. It's better to have silence for you to gather your thoughts than to waste words until you figure out what you want to say.
              3. Don't try to fill the void. Silence can be uncomfortable (but it's the easiest thing to edit!), so we often fill the void with unnecessary words. If you said what you needed to, stop speaking!
              4. Learn to be concise. Not every answer needs a lengthy explanation. If you feel you have to summarize at the end of your explanation, maybe you could have skipped everything leading up to that summary and given only the summary.
              5. Learn to expound. Sometimes, you can be too concise by giving one-word responses. If you're answer is “yes,” explain it more.
              6. Avoid immediate summaries or recaps. I struggle with this, myself. I'll give a wordy explanation and then summarize immediately after. If you do this, too, something was unnecessary. Note that this is separate from reviewing (such as repeating previous points or referring back to the “headline”).

              Missing context

              There are multiple contexts you need to include or make irrelevant with your podcast.

              Your audience doesn't think like you or remember your content as well as you do. That sometimes results in their forgetting what you're talking about.

              Imagine you removed the first portion from your presentation. Would others still know what you're talking about? Would the context still be obvious?

              The other context you may be missing is your immediate context when you're recording the episode. It could be current events, recording date, or something you can see but your audience can't.

              Here are some ways to ensure your audience doesn't forget your context.

              1. Repeat proper nouns. If you're talking about something specific, be specific! Avoid generic terms that assume your audience knows what you're talking about. For example, a movie-review episode should repeat the title of the movie throughout the discussion. This also helps for show notes.
              2. Repeat actionable information. If you're presenting any kind of call to action, including recommending resources, repeat the name of the item and where people can get it.
              3. Reset the context without a break. Podcasts are not radio and aren't consumed like radio. People usually don't jump into the middle of an episode without having heard the beginning at some point. Yes, their consumption may be split up across time (such as before and after work). Thus, it's important to reset the context to remind your audience what you're talking about. This doesn't have to be done with a cliché break like a radio show where you “go somewhere” and then “come back.” Weave your context reminders throughout your conversation. This may even mean momentarily shifting to address your audience and talk about the guest and then shifting back.
              4. Be timeless or specific. Although most podcast consumption happens within a couple days of download, a podcast is a time-shifted medium. You may be recording at night, but your audience may be listening at a different time. When possible, avoid time-based stuff that may be irrelevant in a few weeks or months. But if you must refer to time-based stuff, be specific by giving the exact date. Relative dates (such as “this Thursday”) can work is for regularly recurring events. Such as a weekly webinar that is always on the same day.
              5. Ignore video. One of the most frustrating things I hear from podcasts that host live-streaming video is when they refer to something the participants can see, but the majority of the audience (the podcast downloaders) can't see. The context is completely missing. If you want to refer to something visual, describe it for your audience without making them feel inferior for not being present to watch.

              Thank you for the podcast reviews!

              • Panda303 from the UK said, “Practical and addictive. I can't recommend this podcast enough; it's informative and has a lot of practical ideas, and is also really interesting to listen to. I'm currently in the development stage of my own podcast and I've gained so much advice and ideas from listening to this. Even if you know the information contained here, the podcast in itself sets an example on how to clearly present information. If you're a podcaster or just curious about podcasting, you will definitely enjoy listening.”

              Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

              Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

              Announcements

              Need personalized podcasting help?

              I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

              Ask your questions or share your feedback

              Connect with me

              Disclosure

              This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

              ]]>
              https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-fix-common-podcast-presentation-problems-tap274/feed/ 4 Whether you podcast alone or with others, presentation problems can hinder effective communication and slow your podcast growth. Here are some solutions to common presentation problems.
              Filler words
              Distractions
              Short responses
              Wasted words
              Missing context

              Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

              Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

              Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/274

              FEEDBACK
              Call (903) 231-2221
              Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
              Send a voice message from http://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

              MAILING ADDRESS
              The Audacity to Podcast
              PO Box 739
              Burlington, KY 41005]]>
              Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 36:42 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-fix-common-podcast-presentation-problems-tap274/
              How to Fix Common Podcast Recording Problems – TAP273 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/xJSiTpPjxfk/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-fix-common-podcast-recording-problems-tap273/#comments Tue, 14 Jun 2016 13:00:16 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=10853 How-to-Fix-Common-Podcast-Recording-Problems-Wide

              Recording problems can result in noisy, corrupted, or missing audio. Test before anything important! Here are solutions to these common podcasting problems.

              Missing audio

              Whether through software or hardware, there's a chance you're not recording everything you think you are. Here are some things to check.

              1. Can your tool record what you want? I've seen a lot of podcasters think recording Skype calls was as simple as using Audacity, but it's not. Whether you're using hardware or software, ensure that it can even do what you want it to do with the tools you have.
              2. Is everything properly connected? Cables might be loose or not connected, or apps might not be running.
              3. Is everything on? Power, mute, volume, and more could be simple switches or knobs that might not be in their right place.
              4. Are signals properly routed? Trace the cables and audio processing chain to ensure everything is going where it should be. On the software side, ensure that your apps are looking at the right devices for inputs and outputs.

              Corrupted audio

              It's horrible to record audio only to discover it's completely unusable due to corruption. Here are some things to check.

              1. Reboot before recording.
              2. Quit as many background apps and processes as possible and don't run anything resource-intensive.
              3. Unplug and reconnect digital audio interfaces.
              4. Keep enough free space on recording devices.
              5. Ensure your input levels aren't too high.

              Noise

              Unwanted noise comes in many forms. You may be able to remove it with software, but it's best to remove it before you record. Here are some things to check.

              1. Ambient background noise: turn off what's making noise, move away from it, put things between your mic and the noise, and point your mic away from it.
              2. Constant hiss (not background noise from your environment): get closer to the mic (about a fist-width away), use quality equipment, and don't let low-quality gear handle the audio amplification.
              3. Humming, buzzing, or strange interference: keep audio cables away from power cables, plug everything that's connected to each other into the same surge protector, use a ground-loop isolator, use a HumX, move equipment farther away from each other, and invest in quality gear (including cables).

              Volume

              If the audio is too loud, it will clip and distort. If it's too quiet, then you may introduce more noise when you amplify the audio. Here are some ways to ensure consistent volume levels.

              1. Learn good microphone technique: stay a consistent distance from the microphone, but move farther away when you get louder.
              2. Watch volume meters when testing different sources: have each host or sound source come through one at a time and ensure they average the same volume range.
              3. Record test audio for review: it's hard to mix your own voice with others' in real time. A recording will let you see and hear the actual differences to tweak.
              4. Listen instead of looking: loudness is more than the visual waveform (although it is generally a good representation). A highly compressed signal may look quieter than an uncompressed signal, but it could still be louder.
              5. Use proper measuring tools: use a LUFS-measurement tool, such as r128x-GUI for OS XOrban Loudness Meter for Windows, or the measuring tools in professional software to get actual numbers. These are integrated loudness (measured in LUFS), loudness range (LRA), and true peak (dBTP). Ideal targets are -19 (mono) / -16 (stereo) LUFS, under 4 LU LRA, and -1.0 or lower dBTP.

              Thank you for the podcast reviews!

              • Timm S. from Switzerland said, “Bingeworthy. Whether you've just started podcasting or are a seasoned podcaster, this show will bring you useful tips with depth and humor.”

              Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

              Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

              Announcements

              • Podcasters' Society opens to new members on July 1. Join the waiting list for a special bonus!
              • I'm taking a sabbatical in June 1 through July 15, 2016. I'll still have publish podcast episodes and my weekly email newsletter, but I'll be available only to members of Podcasters' Society. All emails, voicemails, and other comments during that time will be automatically archived and will not be responded to unless you email again after July 15.

              Need personalized podcasting help?

              I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

              Ask your questions or share your feedback

              Connect with me

              Disclosure

              This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

              ]]>
              https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-fix-common-podcast-recording-problems-tap273/feed/ 6 Recording problems can result in noisy, corrupted, or missing audio. Test before anything important! Here are solutions to these common podcasting problems.
              Missing audio
              Corrupted audio
              Noise
              Volume

              Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

              Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

              Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/273

              FEEDBACK
              Call (903) 231-2221
              Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
              Send a voice message from http://TheAudacitytoPodcast

              MAILING ADDRESS
              The Audacity to Podcast
              PO Box 739
              Burlington, KY 41005]]>
              Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 32:17 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-fix-common-podcast-recording-problems-tap273/
              Sennheiser MKE 440 Stereo Shotgun Mic for Cameras http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/Des1Q2pLyG0/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/sennheiser-mke-440-stereo-shotgun-mic-for-cameras/#respond Thu, 09 Jun 2016 13:00:57 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=10884

              Get better ambiance in your videos with the Sennheiser MKE 440 Stereo Shotgun Mic.

              The MKE 440 is a V-shaped mic with two matched mini-shotgun microphones, clear focus, side-noise rejection, and audio that matches the image. The MKE 440 includes internal shock mounts and a stainless steel grill that protects against wind and offers adjustable sensitivity.

              The stereo-separation of the sound can be used for clear-focused video and practical interviews on-the-fly for podcasters, but it adds a more experiential sound that Sennheiser is known for.

              The Sennheiser MKE 440 Shotgun Mic is available now for $349.

              Need personalized podcasting help?

              I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

              Ask your questions or share your feedback

              Connect with me

              Disclosure

              This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

              ]]>
              https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/sennheiser-mke-440-stereo-shotgun-mic-for-cameras/feed/ 0 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/sennheiser-mke-440-stereo-shotgun-mic-for-cameras/
              Sennheiser MK 4 Digital Studio Condenser Mic for iOS http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/OrZw11ckGrA/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/sennheiser-mk-4-digital-studio-condenser-mic-for-ios/#respond Wed, 08 Jun 2016 13:00:54 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=10888

              If you like the sound of a studio condenser microphone, the Sennheiser MK 4 Digital is a portable and professional microphone for connecting to iOS devices.

              The MK 4 Digital is a studio condenser microphone that records into any audio app (such as Apogee MetaRecorder), video app, or live-streaming app on a Lightning-connected iOS device (iPhone, iPod Touch, or iPad).

              I usually don't recommend condenser microphones for podcasters because of typically noisy podcast “studios”—heating/ventilation/air conditioning, computer fans, appliances, etc. However, because the MK 4 Digital connects to any iOS device, you can make a noise-free “studio” out of any space you can take your mic and iPhone, iPod Touch, or iPad.

              Expect the Sennheiser MK 4 Digital Studio Condenser Mic for iOS in summer 2016, priced around $400. Read Sennheiser's announcement for more information.

              Need personalized podcasting help?

              I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

              Ask your questions or share your feedback

              Connect with me

              Disclosure

              This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

              ]]>
              https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/sennheiser-mk-4-digital-studio-condenser-mic-for-ios/feed/ 0 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/sennheiser-mk-4-digital-studio-condenser-mic-for-ios/
              How to Fix Common iTunes Podcast Problems – TAP272 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/t1AzjnZ1XOc/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-fix-common-itunes-podcast-problems-tap272/#comments Tue, 07 Jun 2016 13:00:38 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=10848 How-to-Fix-Common-iTunes-Podcast-Problems-Wide

              iTunes is the largest podcast directory and it powers many podcast apps. Here's how to fix the most common podcasting problems you may face with iTunes.

              Directory information

              All the information about your podcast in iTunes (title, descriptions, episode, cover art, copyright, etc.) is pulled from your RSS feed. Thus, to change how your podcast is listed in the iTunes store, you need to change the information in your RSS feed.

              This would be in FeedBurner only if you're using the horrible “SmartCast” feature. Otherwise, make the changes where the feed is being generated.

              Ratings, reviews, ranking, and related podcasts are maintained by Apple, and you can't change them.

              Missing the latest episode

              I'm quite certain this is the most common iTunes issue podcasters complain about. They'll publish a new episode and then look at their iTunes listing only to see the latest episode isn't there yet.

              DON'T PANIC!

              First, if the episode downloads fine for you (subscribed to your own podcast) and others, then there's probably nothing wrong. People are subscribed directly to your RSS feed, so it doesn't matter whether iTunes displays the latest episode in the store. Your subscribers will still download it automatically according to their app's settings.

              iTunes caches everything, so it can sometimes take up to 24 hours for a new episode to appear. However, iTunes also learns your publishing frequency and may update your podcast more quickly around the time you consistently publish a new episode.

              If you've waited at least 24 hours, login to Podcasts Connect with the Apple ID you used to submit your podcast, click on your podcast and click to refresh your feed. Then wait another 24 hours.

              If your iTunes listing still hasn't updated, there may be a different problem with your feed causing issues with iTunes. Libsyn has seen this to most commonly be the podcast cover art. See the next section for tips on fixing that.

              But if the latest episode doesn't download, then you may need to fix common podcast RSS feed problems.

              Podcast cover art hasn't updated

              If you changed your podcast cover art but it hasn't updated, yet, in iTunes. It could be one of several issues.

              1. Broken URL—This is the basic “Did you turn it on?” issue, but it could still be a problem. Ensure the URL actually works. I recommend opening a private/incognito browser window to check.
              2. Time—Wait at least 24 hours. If it still hasn't updated, login to Podcasts Connect with the Apple ID you used to submit your podcast, and refresh your feed. Then wait another 24 hours.
              3. File size—This is the most common problem I see. The image file needs to be smaller than 512 KB for iTunes to be able to process it. Try extra image compression, smoother or no textures, or fewer colors to get the file size smaller.
              4. Filename and URL—iTunes will only know to update the image if the URL has changed. This could be automatically changed if your image URL has a date. But I still recommend changing the file name. It could be as simply as adding a version number or year to the file.
              5. Pixel dimensions—Your cover art should be at least 1,400 × 1,400 or at most 3,000 × 3,000. Anything outside that may cause issues.
              6. Image hosting—Where your podcast cover art is hosted must support HTTP HEAD requests. Most web-hosting and all podcast-hosting companies support this. But file-sharing tools may not.
              7. Color format—Images must be 16-bit RGB. Anything else may cause problems.
              8. Wrong file format—Images must be JPEG (.jpg or .jpeg) or PNG (.png). Anything else won't work.

              If you change anything, remember to wait at least another 24 hours.

              In the very rare case, there may be a problem on Apple's side, so contact them through Podcasts Connect to ask that they force refresh, after you have done everything else.

              You can't see your podcast's reviews

              Being able to see your podcasts' reviews in iTunes has several layers and points of potential oversight.

              1. Different countries—iTunes is currently available in 155 countries. When you submit your podcast to Apple, your podcast is automatically added to all these others iTunes Stores (explicit podcasts are excluded from a few countries). Each iTunes store has its own rankings, ratings, and reviews for your podcast. Thus, you may simply be looking at the wrong country. You could manually switch iTunes between its 155 countries, or use My Podcast Reviews to check them all automatically.
              2. Confusion with ratings—People can rate a podcast with one to five stars without writing a review, but every written review must have a rating. Thus, it's possible someone merely rated your podcast but didn't write a review. Apple doesn't offer any identifying information or ratings API.
              3. Incompleted process—It's possible whoever wrote the review didn't complete the process.
              4. Automatic filtering—Apple has automatic filters to prevent profanity from appearing in iTunes. Thus, any review with profanity may be automatically removed.
              5. Time—Because Apple caches the iTunes stores, it could take 24 hours for new reviews to appear, or even longer if Apple is already having problems. Some of the My Podcast Reviews copycats have also run into API issues that result in missing reviews, but My Podcast Reviews has been specially designed to not be susceptible to such API issues.

              Thank you for the podcast reviews!

                Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

                Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

                Announcements

                • Please remember to vote for our podcasts and our friends' in the Podcast Awards every day through June 12.
                • Podcasters' Society opens to new members on July 1. Join the waiting list for a special bonus!
                • I'm taking a sabbatical June 1 through July 15, 2016. I will still publish podcast episodes and my weekly email newsletter, but I'll be available only to members of Podcasters' Society. All emails, voicemails, and other comments during that time will be automatically archived and will not be responded to. So if you need to reach me, please try again after July 15.

                Need personalized podcasting help?

                I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

                Ask your questions or share your feedback

                Connect with me

                Disclosure

                This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

                ]]>
                https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-fix-common-itunes-podcast-problems-tap272/feed/ 7 iTunes is the largest podcast directory and it powers many podcast apps. Here's how to fix the most common podcasting problems you may face with iTunes.
                iTunes is the largest podcast directory and it powers many podcast apps. Here's how to fix the most common podcasting problems you may face with iTunes.



                Directory information

                All the information about your podcast in iTunes (title, descriptions, episode, cover art, copyright, etc.) is pulled from your RSS feed. Thus, to change how your podcast is listed in the iTunes store, you need to change the information in your RSS feed.

                This would be in FeedBurner only if you're using the horrible "SmartCast" feature. Otherwise, make the changes where the feed is being generated.

                Ratings, reviews, ranking, and related podcasts are maintained by Apple, and you can't change them.

                Missing the latest episode

                I'm quite certain this is the most common iTunes issue podcasters complain about. They'll publish a new episode and then look at their iTunes listing only to see the latest episode isn't there yet.

                DON'T PANIC!

                First, if the episode downloads fine for you (subscribed to your own podcast) and others, then there's probably nothing wrong. People are subscribed directly to your RSS feed, so it doesn't matter whether iTunes displays the latest episode in the store. Your subscribers will still download it automatically according to their app's settings.

                iTunes caches everything, so it can sometimes take up to 24 hours for a new episode to appear. However, iTunes also learns your publishing frequency and may update your podcast more quickly around the time you consistently publish a new episode.

                If you've waited at least 24 hours, login to Podcasts Connect with the Apple ID you used to submit your podcast, click on your podcast and click to refresh your feed. Then wait another 24 hours.

                If your iTunes listing still hasn't updated, there may be a different problem with your feed causing issues with iTunes. Libsyn has seen this to most commonly be the podcast cover art. See the next section for tips on fixing that.

                But if the latest episode doesn't download, then you may need to fix common podcast RSS feed problems.

                Podcast cover art hasn't updated

                If you changed your podcast cover art but it hasn't updated, yet, in iTunes. It could be one of several issues.


                * Broken URL—This is the basic "Did you turn it on?" issue, but it could still be a problem. Ensure the URL actually works. I recommend opening a private/incognito browser window to check.
                * Time—Wait at least 24 hours. If it still hasn't updated, login to Podcasts Connect with the Apple ID you used to submit your podcast, and refresh your feed. Then wait another 24 hours.
                * File size—This is the most common problem I see. The image file needs to be smaller than 512 KB for iTunes to be able to process it. Try extra image compression, smoother or no textures, or fewer colors to get the file size smaller.
                * Filename and URL—iTunes will only know to update the image if the URL has changed. This could be automatically changed if your image URL has a date. But I still recommend changing the file name. It could be as simply as adding a version number or year to the file.
                * Pixel dimensions—Your cover art should be at least 1,400 × 1,400 or at most 3,000 × 3,000. Anything outside that may cause issues.
                * Image hosting—Where your podcast cover art is hosted must support HTTP HEAD requests. Most web-hosting and all podcast-hosting companies support this. But file-sharing tools may not.
                * Color format—Images must be 16-bit RGB.]]>
                Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 27:30 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-fix-common-itunes-podcast-problems-tap272/
                How the Electro-Voice RE320 Dynamic Microphone Was Created http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/h18hbSikJmk/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-the-electro-voice-re320-dynamic-microphone-was-created/#comments Fri, 03 Jun 2016 14:42:40 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=10878

                The Electro-Voice RE320 is my favorite podcasting microphone. It produces a more natural sound than other studio dynamic microphones in the same price range.

                Watch my previous review of the RE320 and my review of the RE20.

                At NAB Show 2016, I talked to Rick Belt, one of the men behind the RE320. Rick told the story behind the RE320, including its predecessors, the Electro-Voice RE20 and RE27N/D. Rick Belt, known as TheEVMicGuy on YouTube, was part of a strategic team to make a versatile dynamic cardioid microphone that works great for voice, as well as recording music, with a lower price point than the more expensive RE20 and RE27N/D.

                Electro-Voice began developing the technology for the RE20 and the RE27N/D in the 1950s, which became known as Variable D. This technology means you don't have to maintain an exact distance from the microphone to get a consistent tone. (Most dynamic microphones get more bassy the closer you get.) Variable D was patented in 1964 and Electro-Voice used this technology in 1968 in the RE20.

                In the 1980s, Electro-Voice began using neodymium magnets, which are more sensitive than the ceramic magnets in the RE20. Around 1984, they introduced the RE27N/D with this technology. The RE27N/D sounds more like a condenser microphone, which most people find makes their voice sound richer and more “radio-like,” even though it is a dynamic mic, which means it won’t pick up as much background noise.

                Electro-Voice wanted to approach the music market with a less expensive version of the RE20, using its body and the engine out of the RE27N/D. Electro-Voice came up with a low-mass, high-velocity plastic that responds quickly to voice.

                And thus, inspired from Rick's tests in his basement, the RE320 Variable-D dynamic vocal and instrument microphone was born.

                The Electro-Voice RE320 is my top recommend podcasting microphone and it retails for $299.

                For comparison, the Electro-Voice RE20 retails for $449 and the Electro-Voice RE27N/D retails for $499.

                Need personalized podcasting help?

                I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

                Ask your questions or share your feedback

                Connect with me

                Disclosure

                This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

                ]]>
                https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-the-electro-voice-re320-dynamic-microphone-was-created/feed/ 2 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-the-electro-voice-re320-dynamic-microphone-was-created/
                Sennheiser HandMic Digital Dynamic Microphone Connects to iOS via Lightning Port http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/poJR33gNdNs/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/sennheiser-handmic-digital-dynamic-microphone-connects-to-ios-via-lightning-port/#respond Fri, 03 Jun 2016 13:55:10 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=10834

                Record quality audio outside your studio with Sennheiser's new HandMic Digital. This microphone plugs directly into your iOS device's Lightning port. This microphone can be used for podcasting, video recording, or live-streaming wherever you can take your iOS device (iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad).

                The HandMic Digital is among the latest Sennheiser products in collaboration with Apogee. Connecting the HandMic Digital via Lightning port produces better audio quality than a device's 3.5 mm TRRS connector. The Lightning connection allows the gain and processing to be handled by the external device instead of limited to iOS's internal hardware audio processor.

                The design is based on the Sennheiser E835. HandMic Digital features built-in wind reduction for outdoor use, as well as internal shock mounting for handheld use. The HandMic Digital can also connect to any PC via the included USB cable.

                If you prefer studio use, the HandMic Digital also includes a standard microphone clamp and desktop stand.

                The HandMic Digital works best with Apogee MetaRecorder, but it is compatible with any other audio or video app that accepts a Lightning-connected audio devices (such as FiLMiC Pro, Periscope, and much more).

                The Sennheiser HandMic Digital is will be available in summer, 2016, and will retail for under $300.

                Need personalized podcasting help?

                I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

                Ask your questions or share your feedback

                Connect with me

                Disclosure

                This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

                ]]>
                https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/sennheiser-handmic-digital-dynamic-microphone-connects-to-ios-via-lightning-port/feed/ 0 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/sennheiser-handmic-digital-dynamic-microphone-connects-to-ios-via-lightning-port/
                How to Fix Common Podcast RSS Feed Problems – TAP271 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/QB6Ba7yp9eI/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-fix-common-podcast-rss-feed-problems-tap271/#comments Tue, 31 May 2016 13:54:00 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=10844 How-to-Fix-Common-Podcast-RSS-Feed-Problems-Wide

                If your RSS feed breaks, your podcast breaks. So here are the most common RSS problems you may face in podcasting and how to fix them.

                Validation errors

                A lot of podcast RSS feed problems are related to validation problems. This is when something, often technical, is inside the feed that shouldn't be there, something is there that shouldn't be, or something is formatted incorrectly. Here's how to check that.

                1. Validate your feed.
                  1. FEED Validator—This is a basic RSS validator. “Warnings” won't break your feed, but errors will. Try to find where the error is.
                  2. Cast Feed Validator or PodBa.se Podcast Validator—These feed-validators are designed for podcasters and will more appropriately point out problems like missing enclosures, poor hosting, and other issues specific to podcasting.
                2. Fix the problem.
                  1. If it is an invalid RSS feed, the problem could be a hidden or invalid character (such as a space or quotation mark) that you simply need to retype. Other times, it may be some code you need to remove from a post (such as embedded Flash objects or other special coding).
                  2. Follow the advice the validation tools give for replacing or fixing other problems.

                Inaccessible feed

                If your feed is completely missing (you'll usually get an 404 error), there could be many things going wrong.

                1. Double-check the URL—Ensure you spelled everything correctly, ensure you're using or not using “www.” as your domain is set up.
                2. Reset permalinks—Some things can break this, so simply save your WordPress permalink setting again.
                3. Test for conflicts—Plugins and themes could cause conflicts with your RSS feed (though PowerPress is now protecting the default podcast-only feed), try disabling all other plugins to see if your feed can still be reached, then reactivate them one or two at a time. Try changing your theme, too.

                Timeouts

                When your feed takes a long time to load, some RSS clients will give up after a certain amount of time. Your feed may be valid, but if it's too slow, it times out and will be the same as if it was inaccessible.

                1. Reduce your feed size—1 MB is the practical maximum, but I recommend smaller than 512 KB.
                2. Use caching—Implement a tool to caches your RSS feed so it isn't regenerated with every request, or consider making it a static file on your site. You may need the caching on the rest of your website in order to make your feed load better.
                3. Ask your web host about performance issues—It could be your site or someone else's on the server with some bad code that is hogging the server resources.

                Missing episodes

                Your feed could be missing the latest episode or past episodes. Here are some things to check.

                1. Properly attached the episode—A blog post without a podcast episode properly added won't appear in podcast apps. There have been many times I published a post and forgot to attach the media.
                2. Check the channel/category—If you use custom channel or category feeds, you may have put the post in the wrong place.
                3. Low item/episode limit—The WordPress default limits RSS feeds to 10 items. You may need to increase that in the WordPress Reading settings, PowerPress, Libsyn, or whatever is creating your RSS feed (FeedBurner doesn't create feeds, so don't look there).
                4. Combined blog posts and podcast episodes—If you don't have a podcast-only RSS feed, each blog post could be bumping out your podcast episodes from the item limit.
                5. Theme/plugin settings—Some WordPress themes or plugins may offer the option to filter the main blog page, which could affect what goes in your RSS feeds.
                6. Caches—Website caching, CDN/external caching, and feed caching may need to be refreshed for your latest episode to display.
                7. Duplicated posts—Some tools may allow you to duplicate a post, but it in rare cases, it may also duplicate the globally unique identifier (GUID), so most RSS clients won't recognize the new post as a new episode.

                Accidental redownloads

                If your subscribers have been forced to redownload your old episodes, it could mess up your stats and annoy your audience.

                The core cause is the globally unique identifier (GUID) in every item/episode of an RSS feed. If that GUID changes, RSS clients and podcast apps will think that is a new post.

                Don't change that GUID! Here are some specific situations to be cautious.

                1. Migration—When moving your RSS feed from one place to another, ensure your new feed-generator will also migrate the GUIDs. Blubrry, PowerPress, and Libsyn are smart enough to do that; I can't say the same for other providers.
                2. Find and replace operations—If you're editing your database, be very careful when running find-and-replace. It's best to filter such operations to only specific columns and thus exclude the GUID.
                3. Correcting episode mistakes—Unless it's absolutely necessary to force a redownload, reuse the existing post, URL, and filename for fixing mistakes. Creating a new post—even with the same URL, title, and filename—will force a redownload.

                Thank you for the podcast reviews!

                  Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

                  Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

                  Announcements

                  • Please remember to vote for our podcasts and our friends' in the Podcast Awards every day through June 12.
                  • Podcasters' Society opens to new members on July 1. Join the waiting list for a special bonus!
                  • I'm taking a sabbatical June 1 through July 15, 2016. I will still publish podcast episodes and my weekly email newsletter, but I'll be available only to members of Podcasters' Society. All emails, voicemails, and other comments during that time will be automatically archived and will not be responded to. So if you need to reach me, please try again after July 15.

                  Need personalized podcasting help?

                  I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

                  Ask your questions or share your feedback

                  Connect with me

                  Disclosure

                  This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

                  ]]>
                  https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-fix-common-podcast-rss-feed-problems-tap271/feed/ 3 If your RSS feed breaks, your podcast breaks. So here are the most common RSS problems you may face in podcasting and how to fix them.
                  Validation errors
                  Inaccessible feed
                  Timeouts
                  Missing episodes
                  Accidental redownloads

                  Vote for our shows in the Podcast Awards! https://noodle.mx/podcastawards

                  Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

                  Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

                  Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/271

                  FEEDBACK
                  Call (903) 231-2221
                  Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
                  Send a voice message from http://TheAudacitytoPodcast

                  MAILING ADDRESS
                  The Audacity to Podcast
                  PO Box 739
                  Burlington, KY 41005]]>
                  Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 30:38 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-fix-common-podcast-rss-feed-problems-tap271/
                  Should You Host Your Own Podcast RSS Feed? – TAP270 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/3AVc1ORRsGA/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/should-you-host-your-own-podcast-rss-feed-tap270/#comments Tue, 24 May 2016 15:14:01 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=10819 Should-You-Host-Your-Own-Podcast-RSS-Feed-wide

                  Because your RSS feed is the life of your podcast, where you host it is crucial for ownership and control. Here are some things to consider for whether you should host your feed yourself.

                  Feed ownership and hosting are hotly debated among podcast-hosting companies. Each side has some valid arguments, and I'll address more of those shortly. It often comes down to two things: ownership and reliability. Ultimately, the choice is yours to make, and here are some things to consider.

                  What is “owning your podcast RSS feed”?

                  There are several definitions to what it means to “own your podcast RSS feed.”

                  One side of ownership says you only own your feed if it's on a URL you control, the other side says you own your feed as long as you can redirect it (via 301 permanent redirect) wherever and whenever you want.

                  I think both sides are right and are not mutually exclusive.

                  At its core, owning your feed means that no one can take it away from you. You can switch your podcasting technology and keep your audience. You're in control of what goes into your feed.

                  With some third-party feed-creation tools, you can add your layer of ownership with your own domain. This could be through a 302 or 307 temporary redirect, or through advanced DNS mapping (such as the MyBrand feature in FeedBurner).  Such freedom may come at a higher cost, but may be worth it.

                  How truly reliable is your podcast RSS feed?

                  With very few exceptions (Google Play Music, Stitcher, Spotify, and a couple other podcast apps), when someone subscribes to your podcast, they subscribe directly to your RSS feed. Thus, it really doesn't matter to your audience if the podcast directory (such as iTunes) doesn't work or kicks your show out, because your audience gets your episodes from you (via the RSS feed), not from the directory.

                  If your podcast RSS feed goes down, your podcast episodes will be inaccessible for downloading. (However, this won't affect those who have already downloaded the episodes.) Similarly, if the feed is up but the server hosting your media goes down, no one can download new episodes. If either your feed or your media hosting are inaccessible for an extended period, your show will probably be removed from the podcast directories.

                  For nearly every podcaster, we're at the mercy of something outside our control with our feeds. Server hardware could fail, a network could go down, a company could go out of business, and more. Even if you run your own server, you're still at the mercy of the network connection (which is probably outside your control) and even DNS providers (who make domains work). Because of this, no RSS feed is 100% reliable. Nearly everyone gives up a little control and must put their trust in someone else's stability.

                  Some providers have proven themselves more trustworthy than others with protections, redundancies, and a high priority to keep your feed or media hosting online. Blubrry and Libsyn are the two companies that have been around long enough to prove their reliability, which is why you hear me and others recommended these two providers so often. Spreaker and Podbean are good, too, but they don't have that thorough experience and as much time to prove themselves. (Use promo code “noodle” for a free month with Blubrry, Libsyn, Spreaker, and Podbean.)

                  Even FeedBurner, when you have its questionable features disable, has proven itself to be fairly reliable. Certainly more reliable than shared hosting or some low-end “podcast-hosting” providers.

                  4 reasons you may not want to host your own podcast RSS feed

                  Let's use Libsyn as an example (since they are the only third-party feed-creation service I can fully recommend). Libsyn can create and host your RSS feed for you, whereas FeedBurner merely rehosts the RSS feed you're already creating (and FeedBurner can optionally enhance your non-podcast feed with “SmartCast,” but never use that feature if you already have a podcast feed). Here's why you might want to let someone else host your feed.

                  This information is repurposed from my blog post, “Why you may NOT want to host your own podcast RSS feed.”

                  1. Website stability

                  When your podcast RSS feed is on the same server as your website, you risk hindering your podcast downloads when your website has problems. Even when your web host promises 99.99% uptime, that leaves about 53 minutes of potential downtime per year, but you could likely see more than that.

                  If you’re featured somewhere and 1,000 people try to load your site at the same time, it could crash your website and take down your RSS feed with it.

                  Plugins like PowerPress are great for making and managing your RSS feed. If you want extra stability, you could use Angelo Mandato’s Static Feed plugin for WordPress to reduce how much work your website has to do to serve an XML file for your RSS feed. But even this static file will be inaccessible if your server crashes.

                  2. Bandwidth requirements

                  There is no hard rule about the size of your RSS feed. But a maximum of 512 KB or 1 MB is still a reasonable guideline, if for no other reason, be considerate of your subscribers who have to download that feed file every time their podcast app checks for new episodes. Learn more about how to shrink your RSS feed and why it's important (episode 269).

                  While your RSS feed is not as big as your media files, the feed would be downloaded more often and could actually cause more problems on your server than hosting your media on your server.

                  It's not all that likely, but it is still possible.

                  3. Feed volatility

                  This is the most-cited reason for generating and hosting your podcast feed away from your website content management system (CMS), like WordPress.

                  It’s true that some themes, plugins, or buried website options can break your RSS feed. This happens when any of these insert invalided information into your feed, change how the tags are populated, strip functionality, or have some other poor coding that causes a conflict.

                  I’ve helped several podcasters before with my flat-rate, standard feed repair service. I’ve seen membership plugins, SEO plugins, themes, and simple user error break podcast feeds.

                  Yes, it is possible to break your podcast RSS feed with even popular plugins. The more plugins you have on your site, the more chances there are that something could break.

                  But before you panic, realize that as long as you use tested, respected, and well-written plugins, and stick with only what you truly need, the chances of breaking your feed are quite low. But if you don't want to risk it, either use your media host's feed (as long as you can “own” it) or protect your feed with FeedBurner (that is, with no features enabled, FeedBurner feeds can still stay online when the source feed is down), but still consider using your own domain.

                  4. Dangers on shared hosting

                  If you host your website and podcast feed on a shared hosting provider, then you could be the victim of someone else’s abuse.

                  On shared hosting, every account has equal access to the server’s resources. If someone else’s account hogs those resources (through compromise, abuse, or bad code), it affects the rest of the accounts on that server—up to thousands of other websites.

                  The most common symptom is that your website will run extremely slowly (even with all plugins disabled) and your feed may often timeout. Raise this issue with your shared web-hosting provider and they may be able to fix it, or help you know if you're the one causing the problem and suggest some things to check.

                  4 reasons you may want to host your own podcast RSS feed

                  Whether using PowerPress, hand-coding, or some other feed tool, if the RSS feed lives on your site, you're hosting it yourself, and here's why you might want to do that.

                  This information is repurposed from my blog post, “Why you may WANT to host your own podcast RSS feed.”

                  1. Ownership

                  When your podcast RSS feed is on your own domain, you own it. You can transfer it to another domain, use whatever software you want to create it, or redirect it to anywhere else.

                  You’re not at risk of third-party company shutting down their service (there have been rumors of FeedBurner’s demise for many years) because you own your feed, not them.

                  And if you’re ever dissatisfied with the performance of your feed on your server, you can take it anywhere else you want, and never lose your subscribers.

                  2. Total control

                  Hosting your podcast feed on your server opens up a world of possibilities for how you generate and manage that feed. You can do anything you want with it.

                  Your total control of your RSS feed let’s you change media hosting as fast as a find and replace tool (PowerPress has a great one built in). You can also integrate any stats provider you wish.

                  When new RSS features become standards, it’s easy to implement in your own feed.

                  You can change, add, or remove anything you want when you create and host your own RSS feed. And all of this can be done with powerful self-hosting tools (like WordPress with PowerPress) that don’t require you to know anything about RSS or XML. With the right skills or instructions, you can even customize PowerPress to support edge technologies.

                  3. Simple workflow

                  You should already have a platform for your podcast on a self-hosted website you own and control. I highly recommend WordPress hosted on either BlueHost or WP Engine.

                  As your platform, this should be the home for your content. If you use well-designed tools like WordPress and PowerPress, then this platform can also be the tool to create your podcast RSS feed. It’s not complicated.

                  A podcasting plugin like PowerPress allows you to continue your regular, familiar workflow of blogging with WordPress, and then add a simple extra step to turn a blog post into a podcast episode.

                  This means your platform is where you create your blog, sell your products and services, engage with your community, and create your podcast RSS feed without much extra work. It’s all coming from a single website so you can manage everything in one place with all the extra features you may want.

                  If you want the most simple workflow with your WordPress site, then consider using Blubrry media hosting. This allows you to not only create your text in WordPress, but also upload your media directly through WordPress, manage your episodes, and even automatically add ID3 tags! Now, Libsyn also has a WordPress plugin that simplifies the workflow for using their feed with WordPress, but this is somewhat limited and can't be retroactive (as of today).

                  4. Extendability

                  When your feed comes from your own platform, it’s also very easy to launch additional podcasts or offer additional feeds for the same podcast. Other hosts may provide these features, but usually at extra costs.

                  If you use your website to create your podcast feed, then you can use a single media hosting account, but use PowerPress to give you multiple podcast feeds. For example, you could have one account with LibSyn, but use PowerPress to create an audio edition and video edition of your podcast, each with their own RSS feeds.

                  Or you could use the same media hosting to power multiple podcasts, either coming from a single website or from multiple websites. You don’t easily get that kind of extendability with the feed coming from a media host. (Yes, you can sometimes generate additional category feeds, but then you have to use FeedBurner to adjust that feed for your needs.) AfterBuzz TV is a large TV-aftershow podcast network successfully generating hundreds of RSS feeds with PowerPress from their one site.

                  Thank you for the podcast reviews!

                    Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

                    Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

                    Announcements

                    Need personalized podcasting help?

                    I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

                    Ask your questions or share your feedback

                    Connect with me

                    Disclosure

                    This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

                    ]]>
                    https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/should-you-host-your-own-podcast-rss-feed-tap270/feed/ 6 Where you host your podcast RSS feed is crucial for ownership and control. Here are some things to consider for whether you should host your feed yourself.
                    Feed ownership and hosting are hotly debated among podcast-hosting companies. Each side has some valid arguments, and I'll address more of those shortly. It often comes down to two things: ownership and reliability. Ultimately, the choice is yours to make, and here are some things to consider.

                    4 reasons you may not want to host your own podcast RSS feed
                    1. Website stability
                    2. Bandwidth requirements
                    3. Feed volatility
                    4. Dangers on shared hosting

                    4 reasons you may want to host your own podcast RSS feed
                    1. Ownership
                    2. Total control
                    3. Simple workflow
                    4. Extendability

                    Vote for our shows in the Podcast Awards! https://noodle.mx/podcastawards

                    Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

                    Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

                    Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/270

                    FEEDBACK
                    Call (903) 231-2221
                    Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
                    Send a voice message from http://TheAudacitytoPodcast.com

                    MAILING ADDRESS
                    The Audacity to Podcast
                    PO Box 739
                    Burlington, KY 41005]]>
                    Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 33:36 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/should-you-host-your-own-podcast-rss-feed-tap270/
                    How to Shrink Your Podcast RSS Feed and Why It Matters – TAP269 http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/eschCF0ZECw/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-reduce-the-size-of-your-podcast-rss-feed-tap269/#comments Tue, 17 May 2016 14:47:38 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=10766 How-to-Shrink-Your-Podcast-RSS-Feed-and-Why-It-Matters-wide

                    RSS (“RDF Site Summary” or “Really Simple Syndication”) is the core to distributing your podcast. Here's why the RSS size matters, what affects the feed size, and how to reduce the size of your podcast RSS feed.

                    Why the size of the podcast RSS feed matters

                    Most podcast apps (sometimes called a “podcatchers”) or RSS clients download an entire RSS feed every time they check for new items (blog posts, podcast episodes, etc.) from that feed. (A few apps, web directories, and browsers will read special server code that essentially tells the requesting client that nothing has changed since the last check and to not redownload the feed.)

                    Thus, the larger your feed, the more bandwidth is required every time the app checks for new content.

                    Feed size matters for mobile data usage

                    For example, the Apple Podcasts app will automatically check feeds up to every hour. If the podcast feed is 1 MB, then that's 24 MB the app downloads per day and around 720 MB per month. And that's for only one podcast!

                    If a subscriber doesn't have their app set to limit refreshes or downloads when on cellular data, you could be causing unnecessary large data consumption for your subscribers.

                    Feed size matters for speed

                    Small stuff downloads quickly; big stuff downloads slowly. This is also true for podcast RSS feeds. Keeping the size down makes it download faster and thus lets your audience get your latest episodes more quickly.

                    Yes, this may seem trivial when you have a high-speed data network on your phone, but that may not be the case for your worldwide audience.

                    Self-hosted feed size matters for your server

                    If you host your RSS feed yourself (PowerPress, hand-coding, or another website plugin), then you must provide the bandwidth for delivering your full RSS feed to the majority of your audience.

                    For example, if your podcast feed is 1 MB and you have 200 subscribers, that means serving potentially 200 MB per hour or 4,800 MB (nearly 4.7 GB) per day—for only your RSS feed! That may be perfectly acceptable for your web server, but it's something to keep in mind.

                    Aside from the bandwidth requirements, an uncached feed on your server also means more queries required to build the dynamic RSS feed with every request. A single RSS feed could cause thousands of queries, which requires more resources from the server (RAM, CPU, and disk activity). Multiply these requests by how many other subscribers are making the same requests simultaneously, and you can imagine how easily a server can crash from exceeding its resources.

                    Read more about why your may want to host your own RSS feed and why you may not.

                    Some tools limit the size of your RSS feed

                    FeedBurner and some other tools have explicit limits to the size of feeds they support. Currently, FeedBurner's limit for the source feed is 1 MB (up from 512 KB not long ago). If you use FeedBurner or other limited tools and your feed gets too big, your podcast might stop updating.

                    What affects the feed size

                    The size of the RSS feed is based on how many characters are included in the feed itself. For example, “Los Angeles” requires more space than “LA” and long paragraphs require more space than a short sentence.

                    Also, RSS is made up of separate XML (“Extensible Markup Language”) tags, such as <description>, <itunes:images>, and such.

                    The size of images, videos, audio, and other linked assets don't matter, because the code in an RSS feed is only linking to those assets, not embedding them.

                    All of these pieces of data combine to make the RSS feed and each piece affects the overall size. Thus, the more an RSS feed holds, the larger it will be.

                    RSS feeds can be compressed with GZIP through a caching plugin or intelligent RSS tool. But the core idea of shrinking an RSS feed is in reducing the amount of data it contains.

                    5 ways to reduce the size of your RSS feed

                    The following features may be limited based on the podcast-feed-creation tool you're using.

                    1. Enable GZIP compression

                    If you use a third-party tool, such as Libsyn, to create your RSS feed, they probably already compress the feed to reduce its size.

                    If you're self-hosting your RSS feed, then set up a caching plugin for better performance and ensure it caches and compresses the feeds, too (and that it's compatible with PowerPress).

                    2. Use a podcast-only RSS feed

                    If you blog on your WordPress website (which I do highly recommend) and use your site's default RSS feed (/feed), then blog posts and podcast episodes are being combined. That's fine for a the primary feed, but that's not what you should use for your podcast.

                    When your feed contains both blog posts and podcast episodes, two things happen.

                    • Podcast apps or directories will usually read only the podcast episodes and skip the blog posts. Thus, you're wasting space in your podcast feed by including the blog posts.
                    • Blog posts will bump out podcast episodes when you reach your feed item limit. For example, If you have 50 episodes and 50 separate blog posts with a feed limit of 50, you might see only 25 episodes in your podcast app.

                    For WordPress, the best way to get a podcast-only feed is to use PowerPress's default podcast channel feed (/feed/podcast). Using a category's RSS feed (/category-name/feed) can work, too, but it has never been the best idea (except in very rare cases). The PowerPress default channel feed will always contain only podcast episodes entered into the “Podcast Episode” widget of a post.

                    If you can't or don't want to use a PowerPress feed, consider using the RSS feed from your media host. The only hosts I currently trust for this are Libsyn and Blubrry. If you're using any other host, I suggest running the feed through FeedBurner (with all stats and features disabled).

                    3. Activate PowerPress's “Feed Episode Maximizer”

                    If you use PowerPress to create your podcast's RSS feed, activate the Feed Episode Maximizer feature. This will reduce how much information is attached to episodes past your latest 10, and thus significantly reduce the size of your RSS feed.

                    Through PowerPress 6.3, Feed Episode Maximizer is available only on channel and post-type feeds. But later versions of PowerPress offer the feature on category and taxonomy feeds.

                    4. Switch the feed from full content to summaries

                    Remember that every character in your RSS feed takes up extra space. So instead of publishing thorough show notes or a complete transcript in your RSS feed, consider reducing that to summaries.

                    If you use WordPress, go to Settings > Reading to switch “For each article in a feed, show” from “Full text” to “summary.” This will use the first 55 words of your blog post—or the full excerpt, if you enable and write that for each post—instead of the entire post.

                    The more text you write for your podcast, the more this will help. But it's also mostly irrelevant if you use PowerPress's Feed Episode Maximizer, since this will include the full text (if that's WordPress's setting on your site) only for the latest 10 episodes.

                    If you use a different tool for creating your podcast RSS feed, such as Libsyn's or Blubrry's media-hosting feed, then how much content you include is your decision, not a switch in the software.

                    5. Simplify formatting

                    Rich-text-formatting (bold, italics, colors, size, hyperlinks, and more) may not appear to change the number of characters you see, but it adds HTML code to make those changes.

                    For example, compare these two pieces of text:

                    The code behind them looks like this:

                    • The Audacity to Podcast
                    • <span style="color: #003300;"><em><a style="color: #003300;" href="https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/">The Audacity to Podcast</a></em></span>

                    This doesn't mean you should avoid rich text formatting, but I do recommend keeping things clean. Avoid changing colors because this adds extra code and it could make your text unreadable in some apps. Paste as plain text with Cmd-Shift-V (MacOS) or Ctrl-Shift-V (Windows, Linux), or use WordPress's “Paste as Text” toggle (buried in the “more options” toolbar of the post editor) if you're pasting from other programs and it will clean up the hidden code that is often included.

                    6. Reduce the post/episode limit

                    Lastly is the most obvious, but my least recommended option. You could set a smaller limit to how many episodes your podcast RSS feed contains.

                    This will probably have the greatest impact on the size of your feed, because the individual items account for most of the data in your feed. For example, in a feed with 100 items, each episode will account for an average of 1% of the feed size. Thus, reducing the number of episodes by 50% will probably reduce your feed size by the same 50%.

                    However, I recommend this as your last choice, especially for timeless podcasts. Apple's podcast apps limit directory listings to the latest 300 episodes of a podcast. All those episodes contribute to the podcast's findability or search-engine optimization (SEO). Once subscribed, someone can access your archive beyond the latest 300 episodes, for as far back as your RSS feed goes.

                    Thus, adjusting the limit for your RSS feed has more of a personal impact than merely changing the size of your feed. It's ultimately your decision, but here's what I recommend you consider.

                    • For timeless content—that is, stuff that people will still want years from now—I recommend setting the limit to 300. If you have more episodes than that, consider publishing Archive feeds in iTunes for your first 100–300 at a time, as John Lee Dumas does with Entrepreneur on Fire. Thus, each episode is still easily findable and consumable in iTunes.
                    • For current-events content—that is, time-based stuff that won't matter much or at all years from now—I recommend a smaller limit, such as 50 for a weekly podcast (and thus the last year's worth of episodes). I wouldn't count TV-show-fan podcasts in this, because people might watch the TV shows years after they aired.
                    • For podcasts that sell the back catalog, I recommend 3–10 episodes. That seems enough to get someone hooked and eager for more, while not giving them access to everything. But remember that fewer episodes means less SEO for your podcast.

                    If you use a PowerPress feed, you can adjust this episode limit in the PowerPress feed settings. If you use the default WordPress feed (which I don't recommend), adjust the limit in Settings > Reading. If you use a third-party tool to create your RSS feed, then look inside their settings (in Libsyn, Destinations > Libsyn Classic Feed > Advanced Options > Episode/Post Limit).

                    Thank you for the podcast reviews!

                    • vivwill wrote in iTunes USA, “What I Like Most Is Daniel is so honest and earnest. It’s not a scam or a brag about how great he is ever. Some other podcasts feel always like mini-marketing ads for their owners. His doesn’t-it’s clearly his love and livelihood, but never spammy. It’s clear, and he really wants to help his listeners. …” See the full review.

                    Your written iTunes reviews encourage me and they help other people find the podcast. If you appreciate the podcasting information I share, please write your own review on iTunes or Stitcher!

                    Check out My Podcast Reviews to get your own podcast reviews automatically emailed to you and learn how to grow your audience with reviews!

                    Announcements

                    Need personalized podcasting help?

                    I no longer offer one-on-one consulting outside of Podcasters' Society, but request a consultant here and I'll connect you with someone I trust to help you launch or improve your podcast.

                    Ask your questions or share your feedback

                    Connect with me

                    Disclosure

                    This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

                    ]]>
                    https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-reduce-the-size-of-your-podcast-rss-feed-tap269/feed/ 16 RSS is the core to distributing your podcast. Here's why the RSS size matters, what affects the feed size, and how to reduce the size of your podcast RSS feed.
                    Why the size of the podcast RSS feed matters
                    1. Feed size matters for mobile data usage
                    2. Feed size matters for speed
                    3. Self-hosted feed size matters for your server
                    4. Some tools limit the size of your RSS feed

                    What affects the feed size

                    5 ways to reduce the size of your RSS feed
                    1. Enable GZIP compression
                    2. Use a podcast-only RSS feed
                    3. Activate PowerPress's "Feed Episode Maximizer"
                    4. Switch the feed from full content to summaries
                    5. Simplify formatting
                    6. Reduce the post/episode limit

                    Grow your podcast from average to amazing™ in Podcasters' Society: https://PodcastersSociety.com/

                    Get your international podcast reviews from iTunes and Stitcher automatically! https://MyPodcastReviews.com/

                    Links and show notes at https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/269

                    FEEDBACK
                    Call (903) 231-2221
                    Email feedback@TheAudacitytoPodcast.com
                    Send a voice message from http://TheAudacitytoPodcast

                    MAILING ADDRESS
                    The Audacity to Podcast
                    PO Box 739
                    Burlington, KY 41005]]>
                    Daniel J. Lewis, podcasting industry expert and how to podcast teacher clean 41:53 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/how-to-reduce-the-size-of-your-podcast-rss-feed-tap269/
                    Pilotfly H2: 5-Mode, 3-Axis, 1-Handed Gimbal (NAB Show 2016) http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/oz19AViMDX4/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/pilotfly-h2-5-mode-3-axis-1-handed-gimbal-nab-show-2016/#respond Sun, 15 May 2016 19:53:21 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=10799

                    Stabilize your videos and get professional-looking quality using a mirrorless or DSLR camera with the Pilotfly H2 one-handed, 3-axis stabilization gimbal and tool-free design.

                    The Pilotfly H2 is a handheld camera stabilizer, which comes with a 4-way joystick and 5 preconfigured modes:

                    1. Follow mode: The camera follows turns up and down (X axis) or left and right (Y axis), but not roll (Z axis)
                    2. Tilt lock mode: The camera stays level while panning is still possible
                    3. Full lock mode: All 3 axes are locked and the camera stays steady
                    4. Follow roll mode: The camera captures the curve in an action scene, as opposed to the follow mode, in which the camera can only follow movements horizontally or vertically
                    5. Home move mode: Moves the camera back to the home position

                    Other versatility options include being able to invert the gimbal for low-shooting. The Pilotfly H2 can also be re-orentied to accommodate a camera with a flip-out screen.

                    Every Pilotfly stabilizer has implemented Bluetooth, giving you the possibility to remotely control the gimbal with your smartphone or the included RM-01 remote control, which pairs automatically. The remote also has a four-way joystick to pan, tilt or roll the camera; a button to switch modes; and even controllable timelapse.

                    A similar, smaller gimbal for smartphones will be available later in 2016. This could be useful for home video and podcasters. The smartphone gimbal will support horizontal and vertical phone orientations (handy for those vertical-only apps).

                    The Pilotfly H2 is extremely versatile for the $998 retail price. The smartphone gimbal will be available for $320.

                    Visit Pilotfly's website for more information, and preorder from B&H or Adorama.

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                    Disclosure

                    This post may contain links to products or services with which I have an affiliate relationship and may receive compensation from your actions through such links. However, I don't let that corrupt my perspective and I don't recommend only affiliates.

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                    Blind podcasting mic tests (May 2016)—guess what they are and vote for your favorite! http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/TheAudacityToPodcast/~3/vaXDaUPrjpc/ https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/blind-podcasting-mic-tests-may-2016/#comments Thu, 12 May 2016 21:54:41 +0000 https://theaudacitytopodcast.com/?p=10769 Podcasters love to geek-out about podcasting gear. So here's a blind test with four popular podcasting microphones.

                    Each microphone is a studio dynamic microphone connected via XLR to a Behringer X1832USB mixer. The preamp and EQ settings is identical. Each recording has been adjusted only to -19 LUFS and limited to -1 dBTP, but is otherwise raw (no EQ, no compression, no noise gate). These samples were recorded into Adobe Audition via a Behringer U-Control USB audio interface.

                    The following samples are in uncompressed WAV (and thus may be slow to start playback).

                    Mic 1

                    Mic 2

                    Mic 3

                    Mic 4

                    Guess and vote!

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