USA Carry Podcast http://www.usacarry.com Concealed Carry, Reciprocity Maps, Concealed Weapons Permit Thu, 21 Jul 2016 13:00:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 This is the official podcast from USA Carry that will contain audio formats of our articles. USA Carry Podcast clean USA Carry Podcast lukemccoy@gmail.com lukemccoy@gmail.com (USA Carry Podcast) Articles from USA Carry USA Carry Podcast http://www.usacarry.com/wp-content/uploads/powerpress/usa-carry.jpg http://www.usacarry.com Selecting Your Personal Handgun: A Useful Checklist - USA Carry Podcast http://www.usacarry.com/selecting-personal-handgun-checklist/ Fri, 11 Dec 2015 11:53:48 +0000 http://www.usacarry.com/?p=9630 http://www.usacarry.com/selecting-personal-handgun-checklist/#comments Ben Findley <p>This is not a picture of your ideal handgun and certainly does not match any criteria that I have. There are, however, certain very necessary attributes you really need to consider when selecting your personal gun. Often, we just see a gun we like and buy it. Sometimes because Uncle Tom or Aunt Sally said that is the best gun since sliced bread, we buy it. Our range buddy or the gun shop salesperson said that is the gun the pros use or that police officers use, so you cannot go wrong. Other times we just focus on one or two must-have factors that we prefer, then we seek out guns that match just those two things. What is your approach to selecting your personal handgun? I want to share my approach and Checklist to help you.</p> <p>Very rarely, do we take a big picture, total perspective objective approach, specify our use for the gun, decide our criteria up front, prioritize them, and then evaluate the 3 or 4 gun alternatives that we are considering against a standard set of criteria. Frequently, we do not even shoot the guns we are considering, but just assume they will perform right for us. If we do shoot our gun options, we do not test shoot all of them using a standard drill for all guns we are considering. In essence, we just emotionally, subjectively, and irrationally select THE "apple" or do not compare the types of apples, or compare an apple with an orange.  What I am saying is that we should take more time up front and have a more objective, systematic, structured way of selecting our personal handgun, rather than a seat-of-the-pants approach. We should have our goal/use defined, criteria specified, factors identified and ranked, and a way of objectively evaluating each alternative against the same standards. This not "much ado about nothing," as Shakespeare would say. Yes, it takes time and effort to do this, but just think what you are doing. You are selecting a tool that could possibly save your life. You must count on it to do its job. It certainly is worth the focus. I want to share my approach and you can decide if you want to use my Checklist or reduce the factors down to your set, etc. Hope it helps!</p> <p>When selecting my personal handguns, I first decide on my primary use for the gun and identify several factors and criteria that are important to me, prioritize them, and use a standard evaluation scale to evaluate each gun option against each criterion. For years, I have used a standard 5-Point Likert Scale (given below) to evaluate each of my following 22 factors or Criteria for each pistol I am considering. It is important to identify specifications and also use a standard shooting drill for all guns to compare the same factors for each. My Criteria and factors are generally defined below to help. So, I assign my points to each criterion, then total all points for all 22 factors for each pistol and compare them. The pistol with the highest Total Points is probably the pistol for my specific purpose, if I honestly assessed each factor. For your different purposes or use for the gun, you might delete some of the below factors or add your own. I do that sometimes, like reduce the 22 to 7-8. The 5-Point Scale for each criterion is:</p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p>CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE PDF VERSION OF THIS CHECKLIST.</p> <p>Here are some General Definitions of each of the 22 criteria to help you decide on your personal pistol.</p> <p> ACCURACY - able to hit the target as desired for your first shot out-of-the-box without gun modifications; use the same distance, drill, grip, speed, target aimpoint, etc. for each gun</p> <p> RELIABILITY - consistency over repeated trials with the gun; can you shoot it today, tomorrow, & next week with very similar results</p> <p> DURABILITY - are there indications the gun will last a long time; mechanical construction; quality of materials used; manufacturer's workmanship, design & detail</p> <p> ERGONOMICS #1- GRIP/FIT - Proper fit of gun's grip to your particular hand & f... http://www.usacarry.com/selecting-personal-handgun-checklist/feed/ 2 This is not a picture of your ideal handgun and certainly does not match any criteria that I have. There are, however, certain very necessary attributes you really need to consider when selecting your personal gun. Often, This is not a picture of your ideal handgun and certainly does not match any criteria that I have. There are, however, certain very necessary attributes you really need to consider when selecting your personal gun. Often, we just see a gun we like and buy it. Sometimes because Uncle Tom or Aunt Sally said that is the best gun since sliced bread, we buy it. Our range buddy or the gun shop salesperson said that is the gun the pros use or that police officers use, so you cannot go wrong. Other times we just focus on one or two must-have factors that we prefer, then we seek out guns that match just those two things. What is your approach to selecting your personal handgun? I want to share my approach and Checklist to help you.
Very rarely, do we take a big picture, total perspective objective approach, specify our use for the gun, decide our criteria up front, prioritize them, and then evaluate the 3 or 4 gun alternatives that we are considering against a standard set of criteria. Frequently, we do not even shoot the guns we are considering, but just assume they will perform right for us. If we do shoot our gun options, we do not test shoot all of them using a standard drill for all guns we are considering. In essence, we just emotionally, subjectively, and irrationally select THE “apple” or do not compare the types of apples, or compare an apple with an orange.  What I am saying is that we should take more time up front and have a more objective, systematic, structured way of selecting our personal handgun, rather than a seat-of-the-pants approach. We should have our goal/use defined, criteria specified, factors identified and ranked, and a way of objectively evaluating each alternative against the same standards. This not “much ado about nothing,” as Shakespeare would say. Yes, it takes time and effort to do this, but just think what you are doing. You are selecting a tool that could possibly save your life. You must count on it to do its job. It certainly is worth the focus. I want to share my approach and you can decide if you want to use my Checklist or reduce the factors down to your set, etc. Hope it helps!
When selecting my personal handguns, I first decide on my primary use for the gun and identify several factors and criteria that are important to me, prioritize them, and use a standard evaluation scale to evaluate each gun option against each criterion. For years, I have used a standard 5-Point Likert Scale (given below) to evaluate each of my following 22 factors or Criteria for each pistol I am considering. It is important to identify specifications and also use a standard shooting drill for all guns to compare the same factors for each. My Criteria and factors are generally defined below to help. So, I assign my points to each criterion, then total all points for all 22 factors for each pistol and compare them. The pistol with the highest Total Points is probably the pistol for my specific purpose, if I honestly assessed each factor. For your different purposes or use for the gun, you might delete some of the below factors or add your own. I do that sometimes, like reduce the 22 to 7-8. The 5-Point Scale for each criterion is:
 

 
CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE PDF VERSION OF THIS CHECKLIST.
Here are some General Definitions of each of the 22 criteria to help you decide on your personal pistol.

* ACCURACY – able to hit the target as desired for your first shot out-of-the-box without gun modifications; use the same distance, drill, grip, speed, target aimpoint, etc. for each gun


* RELIABILITY – consistency over repeated trials with the gun; can you shoot it...]]>
USA Carry Podcast clean 8:10
5 Items You Should Carry Other Than Your Gun - USA Carry Podcast http://www.usacarry.com/5-items-carry-other-than-gun/ Tue, 17 Nov 2015 18:33:01 +0000 http://www.usacarry.com/?p=9559 http://www.usacarry.com/5-items-carry-other-than-gun/#comments Luke McCoy <p>If you've been following the #digtherig trend, you'll tend to see a variety of objects people pull out of their pockets alongside their inside the waistband concealed carry holster and everyday carry gun.  Items can range from knives to cell phones to keys to card clips.  What's the best combination?</p> <p>In this article, we'll go over a few ideas for items you may consider for your everyday carry setup.<br /> 1. Folding knife<br /> A gun is useful for defense -- a knife has many more applications.  Whether it's taking out a flat head screw or carving away a piece of insulation, a good folding knife is a great option for everyday carry.  Folding knives don't have to be an expensive ordeal.  The trick is just finding one that is light, compact, and fits easily in the pocket.  Another cool feature is a clasp of some sort to keep the knife locked to the inside of the pocket.  Too many of us can sympathize with the guy who sits down on a seat and forgets his folding knife behind.  It happens pretty often.</p> <p>What I Carry: Kershaw Brawler<br /> ...Or a multi-tool<br /> The most ideal thing to carry with you everywhere you go is a multi-tool.  Useful for troubleshooting simple issues or as a last resort for emergency ones, something as simple as a Leatherman multi-tool offers the versatility of a screwdriver, pair of pliers, a file, and a can opener all in one package.  It can be a Swiss Army (or similar) or something fit for an EOD technician -- that's your call.  But you'll certainly be thankful the moment you have cause to use it.</p> <p>What I Carry: Leatherman Wave<br /> 2. Spare magazine<br /> Compact and sub-compact guns usually come at the sacrifice of magazine capacity.  It's always nice to know there's a spare magazine nearby.  And, if you train for reloading after you've engaged your opponents, you'll know that there's definitely confidence in being able to start fresh with a full magazine.  Even if you can't fit a magazine conveniently in a pocket, there are clips you can buy to keep them inside or outside the waistline.<br /> 3. Flashlight<br /> Even a small LED flashlight can be a big help in a dark situation.  Whether it's looking underneath a car to see if a hose got disconnected or just trying to find the front doorstep while coming home at night -- an everyday flashlight is a very safe bet.</p> <p>What I Carry: SureFire E2D Defender<br /> 4. Cell phone<br /> Hate'em or love'em -- it's become a staple of our society.  A 3rd or 4th generation phone is generally able to use map utilities to find your way out of confusing terrain.  It's also essential for calling police or emergency services in the event of an accident or incident.  Hilariously enough, it may even substitute a flashlight for very dark situations.</p> <p>What I Carry: Samsung Galaxy Note 5<br /> 5. Water bottle<br /> People callously assume because we live in a society with a convenience store every block that water isn't one of the most essential things on the planet.  A water bottle -- 16 oz. or more -- can be a constant reminder to hydrate and a short emergency supply in the event you find yourself outside the hospitality of civilization.</p> <p>What I Carry: Yeti Rembler 30oz.</p> <p>In conclusion, our daily carry rig can be light and affordable or heavy and expensive (or any combination thereof).  Personal taste preferences aside, all the items mentioned are good ideas for basic survival in most sticky situations.</p> <p> Folding knife/multi-knife: $11 - $215<br /> Spare magazine: $30+<br /> Flashlight: $5 - 65<br /> Cell phone: $45 - $860 (depending upon model, service plan, etc.)<br /> Water bottle: $1.29 - $30</p> <p>Read the original story: <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.usacarry.com/5-items-carry-other-than-gun/">5 Items You Should Carry Other Than Your Gun</a></p> http://www.usacarry.com/5-items-carry-other-than-gun/feed/ 11 If you’ve been following the #digtherig trend, you’ll tend to see a variety of objects people pull out of their pockets alongside their inside the waistband concealed carry holster and everyday carry gun.  Items can range from knives to cell phones to ... If you’ve been following the #digtherig trend, you’ll tend to see a variety of objects people pull out of their pockets alongside their inside the waistband concealed carry holster and everyday carry gun.  Items can range from knives to cell phones to keys to card clips.  What’s the best combination?
In this article, we’ll go over a few ideas for items you may consider for your everyday carry setup.
1. Folding knife
A gun is useful for defense — a knife has many more applications.  Whether it’s taking out a flat head screw or carving away a piece of insulation, a good folding knife is a great option for everyday carry.  Folding knives don’t have to be an expensive ordeal.  The trick is just finding one that is light, compact, and fits easily in the pocket.  Another cool feature is a clasp of some sort to keep the knife locked to the inside of the pocket.  Too many of us can sympathize with the guy who sits down on a seat and forgets his folding knife behind.  It happens pretty often.
What I Carry: Kershaw Brawler
Or a multi-tool
The most ideal thing to carry with you everywhere you go is a multi-tool.  Useful for troubleshooting simple issues or as a last resort for emergency ones, something as simple as a Leatherman multi-tool offers the versatility of a screwdriver, pair of pliers, a file, and a can opener all in one package.  It can be a Swiss Army (or similar) or something fit for an EOD technician — that’s your call.  But you’ll certainly be thankful the moment you have cause to use it.
What I Carry: Leatherman Wave
2. Spare magazine
Compact and sub-compact guns usually come at the sacrifice of magazine capacity.  It’s always nice to know there’s a spare magazine nearby.  And, if you train for reloading after you’ve engaged your opponents, you’ll know that there’s definitely confidence in being able to start fresh with a full magazine.  Even if you can’t fit a magazine conveniently in a pocket, there are clips you can buy to keep them inside or outside the waistline.
3. Flashlight
Even a small LED flashlight can be a big help in a dark situation.  Whether it’s looking underneath a car to see if a hose got disconnected or just trying to find the front doorstep while coming home at night — an everyday flashlight is a very safe bet.
What I Carry: http://www.usacarry.com/?p=9563 http://www.usacarry.com/mistakes-considerations-in-trigger-control/#comments Ben Findley <p>Read the original story: <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.usacarry.com/mistakes-considerations-in-trigger-control/">Mistakes and Considerations in Trigger Control</a></p> http://www.usacarry.com/mistakes-considerations-in-trigger-control/feed/ 3
Both new and some experienced shooters experience the challenges of controlling the trigger for good hits and must continually practice the fundamentals. I believe that trigger control is one of the, if not THE, most important of the eight fundamentals for effective shooting. While the focus is on the very important trigger control, we must recognize that all the fundamentals are interwoven and influence trigger manipulation and accuracy on target.  There are many types of trigger control mistakes and some use different terms to define the same mistake, but the emphasis should be on overcoming them rather than on the terminology. So here are seven of the many trigger control mistakes I have identified and want to share my definitions and considerations with you, so you can avoid some of my and my students’ mistakes. Hope it helps or at least serves as a starting point for you.
I have identified seven trigger control mistakes:

*
Jerking
* Flinching
* Milking
* Heeling
* Thumbing
* Pushing
* Holding Too Long

Here are my definitions and thoughts about each of these problems.


Jerking
Jerking the trigger at the last second is a mental and physical issue, but primarily a mental one. Shooters must understand the necessity for mentally focusing on their trigger press and train the jerk or slapping motion out of their mechanics. If shooters are consistently shooting to the lower left (as a right-handed shooter), they are probably quickly yanking the trigger back and, perhaps, not even realizing it. A jerk comes from the attempt to fire the shot quickly at a specific point in time that coincides with when the gun becomes immediately positioned on the target. I learned for myself that my eye was usually focused on the target and not on the front sight. Some call this “Timing” the shot. At that instantaneous point in time when the shooter sees the sights on the target, they quickly and suddenly yank on the trigger with the trigger finger so as to hurriedly and immediately fire the shot. The shooter jerks the trigger if he presses the trigger the instant he has a perfect sight alignment. However, this quick reaction or slap usually results in the movement and compression of the rest of the fingers of the dominant hand on the grip and/or the muscles in the hand and wrist to move the muzzle off the target just before the bullet exits the muzzle. Believe me I know all about this problem. Sometimes for me, my anticipation and anxiousness are the genuine culprits for my jerk mistake. I have improved, but must continually discipline my mind to overcome my jerk by mentally concentrating and focusing on the trigger press fundamentals and having a slow, smooth, and deliberate trigger press with minimal movement of my other fingers and hand, while focusing on only the front sight. Sounds easy, but a challenge for me.


Flinching
Flinching is more of a physical response to a shot being fired where the shooter perceives the bang to be unpleasant and possibly dangerous. Flinching is stimulated by the loud noise and movement of a dangerous weapon near the face and head. We know that firing a gun will make a loud noise and there will be recoil. So, it also is a mental issue because we are thinking about and anticipating the recoil and loud noise. Anticipating the upcoming recoil with the loud bang causes our premature reaction to ...]]>
USA Carry Podcast clean 11:04
5 Ways To Be Constantly Improving Your Firearm Accuracy - USA Carry Podcast http://www.usacarry.com/5-ways-constantly-improving-firearm-accuracy/ Fri, 06 Nov 2015 15:30:24 +0000 http://www.usacarry.com/?p=9525 http://www.usacarry.com/5-ways-constantly-improving-firearm-accuracy/#comments Luke McCoy <p>“Slow is fast and fast is slow”<br /> If you’ve ever heard this saying and scratched your head in confusion, don’t worry -- you’re not alone.  It’s a confusing saying but it’s popped up in military circles to describe training tempo.  When you need high speed, low-drag performance, you don’t start off going at 100 mph.  You start with getting each individual piece of a movement correct.</p> <p>Think about it like learning to play piano.  If you’ve never seriously picked up playing the piano in your life and sit down and stare at a piece from Mozart, you’re going to be understandably lost.  Even if you’re an experienced piano player, it will take you time to learn the piece.  That comes with practice, repetition, and focusing on hitting the marks correctly.</p> <p>It doesn’t matter if you can do complex concealed carry handgun maneuvers if you can’t reliably hit your target or transition between magazines.  It’s even more dangerous if you think you’re good -- but you’re actually a soup sandwich.</p> <p>Here’s five ways to be constantly improving your firearm accuracy…<br /> Gradual Improvement Instead Of Zero To Sixty Performance<br /> Think about all those YouTube videos you’ve seen where the Navy Seal operator busts through the door and seamlessly cycles magazines, hitting targets left and right.  He wasn’t born doing that.  And the majority of concealed carriers will never need or want to have those skills.  When you’re at the range, break down the major pieces of any concealed carry encounter.  They are:</p> <p> Situational Awareness -- Active scan around your location.<br /> Target Acquisition -- Target is identified and shooter knows what is in front and behind his target.<br /> Holster Draw And Immediate Fire -- This is a complex movement.  We’ll get into it.<br /> Movement To Cover -- If you’re standing out in the open trading bullets with the enemy, you’re a fool.<br /> Magazine Change And Immediate Fire -- Another complex movement.<br /> Situational Awareness -- Active scan for threats.<br /> Reholstering -- This is the last thing you do when you’re positive the fight is over.</p> <p>Drill 1:  Front Sight Post Focus Drills<br /> This is a set of rounds dedicated to marksmanship.  Speed isn’t necessary right up front.  You want to really focus your attention on the front sight post and it’s alignment with the target.  If your rounds are going all over the place, you need to put more focus on paying close attention to where that front sight post goes.<br /> Drill 2:  Magazine Change Drills<br /> Load two magazines of three rounds each.  Focus on placing those rounds as accurately as possible but get used to switching magazines like you would in real life.  That means if you carry a magazine in your extra mag pouch or back pocket -- that’s where you put it.  If you’re not comfortable with the speed or fluidity of this transition, consider switching it up until you find a pattern that works great for you.<br /> Drill 3:  Transition To Cover<br /> With a target placed at 15 yards or more, this is an excellent opportunity to practice taking cover.  Use benches, tables, or whatever is convenient and allowable at your range to demonstrate to yourself you’re able to push to cover before engaging target.<br /> Drill 4:  Long Range Pistol Shooting<br /> If your target is 40 to 50 yards away, you likely won’t be engaging him with a pistol.  However, 20 to 30 yards is still a decent range to get familiar with.  For these exercises, always practice drawing from your holster.  Even if you need to take more time to acquire target -- do it.  Speed will come with successful practice.<br /> Drill 5:  Close Range Instinctive Shooting<br /> This prepares you for the harsh realities of real world encounters where you don’t have the element of surprise or initiative.  With a target at 5 yards or less, draw and fire.  Always incorporate drawing from your concealed carry holster in the exact manner you intend to do so in the real ... http://www.usacarry.com/5-ways-constantly-improving-firearm-accuracy/feed/ 3 “Slow is fast and fast is slow” If you’ve ever heard this saying and scratched your head in confusion, don’t worry — you’re not alone.  It’s a confusing saying but it’s popped up in military circles to describe training tempo. “Slow is fast and fast is slow”
If you’ve ever heard this saying and scratched your head in confusion, don’t worry — you’re not alone.  It’s a confusing saying but it’s popped up in military circles to describe training tempo.  When you need high speed, low-drag performance, you don’t start off going at 100 mph.  You start with getting each individual piece of a movement correct.
Think about it like learning to play piano.  If you’ve never seriously picked up playing the piano in your life and sit down and stare at a piece from Mozart, you’re going to be understandably lost.  Even if you’re an experienced piano player, it will take you time to learn the piece.  That comes with practice, repetition, and focusing on hitting the marks correctly.
It doesn’t matter if you can do complex concealed carry handgun maneuvers if you can’t reliably hit your target or transition between magazines.  It’s even more dangerous if you think you’re good — but you’re actually a soup sandwich.
Here’s five ways to be constantly improving your firearm accuracy…
Gradual Improvement Instead Of Zero To Sixty Performance
Think about all those YouTube videos you’ve seen where the Navy Seal operator busts through the door and seamlessly cycles magazines, hitting targets left and right.  He wasn’t born doing that.  And the majority of concealed carriers will never need or want to have those skills.  When you’re at the range, break down the major pieces of any concealed carry encounter.  They are:

Situational Awareness — Active scan around your location.
Target Acquisition — Target is identified and shooter knows what is in front and behind his target.
Holster Draw And Immediate Fire — This is a complex movement.  We’ll get into it.
Movement To Cover — If you’re standing out in the open trading bullets with the enemy, you’re a fool.
Magazine Change And Immediate Fire — Another complex movement.
Situational Awareness — Active scan for threats.
Reholstering — This is the last thing you do when you’re positive the fight is over.

Drill 1:  Front Sight Post Focus Drills
This is a set of rounds dedicated to marksmanship.  Speed isn’t necessary right up front.  You want to really focus your attention on the front sight post and it’s alignment with the target.  If your rounds are going all over the place, you need to put more focus on paying close attention to where that front sight post goes.
Drill 2:  Magazine Change Drills
Load two magazines of three rounds each.  Focus on placing those rounds as accurately as possible but get used to switching magazines like you would in real life.  That means if you carry a magazine in your extra mag pouch or back pocket — that’s where you put it.  If you’re not comfortable with the speed or fluidity of this transition, consider switching it up until you find a pattern that works great for you.
Drill 3:  Transition To Cover
With a target placed at 15 yards or more, this is an excellent opportunity to practice taking cover.  Use benches, tables, or whatever is convenient and allowable at your range to demonstrate to yourself you’re able to push to cover before engaging target.
Drill 4:  Long Range Pistol Shooting
If your target is 40 to 50 yards away, you likely won’t be engaging him with a pistol.  However, 20 to 30 yards is still a decent range to get familiar with.  For these exercises, always practice drawing from your holster.  Even if you need to take more time to acquire target — do it.  Speed will come with successful practice.
Drill 5:  Close Range Instinctive Shooting
]]>
USA Carry Podcast clean 4:26
CCW Threat Assessment – What’s Your Biggest Priority? - USA Carry Podcast http://www.usacarry.com/ccw-threat-assessment/ Thu, 05 Nov 2015 18:16:49 +0000 http://www.usacarry.com/?p=9521 http://www.usacarry.com/ccw-threat-assessment/#comments Luke McCoy <p>As a concealed carrier, you’re already aware that situational awareness is your best friend.  It’s how you know what’s brewing before it comes to a head.  But how do you decide what’s the most important?  This is an ongoing struggle for most concealed carriers - but for a few, it ends up being the difference between life and death.<br /> Trusting Your Subconscious “Gut Instincts”<br /> Your brain is way more complex than most will give credit for.  It picks up every single subtle nuance of your environment and it’s your conscious mind that filters that information.  The street light that just turned on, the light two blocks away that just changed from red to green -- these are things your conscious mind likely filters out because it doesn’t appear relevant.</p> <p>However, if your mindset is self-defense, you’ll find your mind may coalesce a number of these seemingly irrelevant pieces of information into a picture.  It may cause you to develop goosebumps or a weird “feeling” that you’re not in the right place at the right time.  Or more specifically - you are in the wrong place at the wrong time.</p> <p>If your “gut instinct” tells you you’re in danger, don’t necessarily immediately act on it - but look to see if that’s reciprocated in your observations.  Being aware of your present circumstances is the first step to avoiding a trap.<br /> Just Because You’re Aware -- Doesn’t Mean You Have To Act<br /> There’s a number of levels of awareness.  Some examples are:</p> <p> “Comatose” -- You’re asleep or passed out.  Threats may drift by you or around you and you’d hardly be aware they exist at all.  </p> <p> “Tuned Out” -- Things are happening around you but your head is in the clouds.  Complacency, apathy, or just general distraction can all feed into this mental mindset.  You may notice possible threats but you dismiss them.  Most people walking around could be described as “tuned out”.  If you see someone with his face buried in his phone -- chances are he’s tuned out.</p> <p> “Relaxed Aware” -- You’re observing your surroundings but not displaying any active interest in anything in particular.  This relaxed awareness gives you the advantage of observing a situation emerge without inserting yourself into it.  It could be described as the guy sitting on the bus, reading a newspaper while two people are arguing.  He’s not necessarily interested in their situation but he’s keeping an eye out for things in his periphery.</p> <p> “Focused Aware” -- This is where you’ve dedicated yourself to actively observing your environment.  You’re looking around, looking for threats, keeping mental notes of what’s transpiring before you are ready to act should the need arise.</p> <p> “High Alert” -- You believe there is a high likelihood you or your family is at risk.  It’s like when you’re walking around your house and you hear a bump against the front door -- or see a car you don’t recognize drive slowly into your driveway.  You may go from simply being aware (or “tuned out”, sometimes) to high alert.</p> <p>See Also: Case Study: Situational Awareness<br /> Need Versus Want -- Prioritizing Threat Assessment<br /> We all want things and we can sometimes confuse those wants for needs.  The three basic needs are food, water, and shelter.  Without those three things, you’re toast.  And in a civil environment, those three things are rarely in jeopardy for long.  When it comes to self-defense situations, your car, your belongings, and most anything outside of life can be replaced.  Your threat assessment ought reflect that.  </p> <p>If you see armed men breaking into a neighbor’s car - that’s cause to call the police.  Observe and report.  The second you step outside your door and decide to engage them with lethal force, you’re risking every single thing you need to survive.  And for what?  For possessions that can be replaced?  Pride?</p> <p>Guns have nothing to do with pride.  They are instruments. http://www.usacarry.com/ccw-threat-assessment/feed/ 5 As a concealed carrier, you’re already aware that situational awareness is your best friend.  It’s how you know what’s brewing before it comes to a head.  But how do you decide what’s the most important?  This is an ongoing struggle for most concealed ... As a concealed carrier, you’re already aware that situational awareness is your best friend.  It’s how you know what’s brewing before it comes to a head.  But how do you decide what’s the most important?  This is an ongoing struggle for most concealed carriers – but for a few, it ends up being the difference between life and death.
Trusting Your Subconscious “Gut Instincts”
Your brain is way more complex than most will give credit for.  It picks up every single subtle nuance of your environment and it’s your conscious mind that filters that information.  The street light that just turned on, the light two blocks away that just changed from red to green — these are things your conscious mind likely filters out because it doesn’t appear relevant.
However, if your mindset is self-defense, you’ll find your mind may coalesce a number of these seemingly irrelevant pieces of information into a picture.  It may cause you to develop goosebumps or a weird “feeling” that you’re not in the right place at the right time.  Or more specifically – you are in the wrong place at the wrong time.
If your “gut instinct” tells you you’re in danger, don’t necessarily immediately act on it – but look to see if that’s reciprocated in your observations.  Being aware of your present circumstances is the first step to avoiding a trap.
Just Because You’re Aware — Doesn’t Mean You Have To Act
There’s a number of levels of awareness.  Some examples are:

“Comatose” — You’re asleep or passed out.  Threats may drift by you or around you and you’d hardly be aware they exist at all.  


“Tuned Out” — Things are happening around you but your head is in the clouds.  Complacency, apathy, or just general distraction can all feed into this mental mindset.  You may notice possible threats but you dismiss them.  Most people walking around could be described as “tuned out”.  If you see someone with his face buried in his phone — chances are he’s tuned out.


“Relaxed Aware” — You’re observing your surroundings but not displaying any active interest in anything in particular.  This relaxed awareness gives you the advantage of observing a situation emerge without inserting yourself into it.  It could be described as the guy sitting on the bus, reading a newspaper while two people are arguing.  He’s not necessarily interested in their situation but he’s keeping an eye out for things in his periphery.


“Focused Aware” — This is where you’ve dedicated yourself to actively observing your environment.  You’re looking around, looking for threats, keeping mental notes of what’s transpiring before you are ready to act should the need arise.


“High Alert” — You believe there is a high likelihood you or your family is at risk.  It’s like when you’re walking around your house and you hear a bump against the front door — or see a car you don’t recognize drive slowly into your driveway.  You may go from simply being aware (or “tuned out”, sometimes) to high alert.

See Also: Case Study: Situational Awareness
Need Versus Want — Prioritizing Threat Assessment
We all want things and we can sometimes confuse those wants for needs.  The three basic needs are food, water, and shelter.  Without those three things, you’re toast.  And in a civil environment, those three things are rarely in jeopardy for long.  When it comes to self-defense situations, your car, your belongings, and most anything outside of life can be replaced.  Your threat assessment ought reflect that.  
If you see armed men breaking into a neighbor’s car – that’s cause to call the police.]]>
USA Carry Podcast clean 4:37
How to Overcome Your Fear Of Concealed Carrying - USA Carry Podcast http://www.usacarry.com/overcome-fear-concealed-carrying/ Wed, 21 Oct 2015 13:46:57 +0000 http://www.usacarry.com/?p=9441 http://www.usacarry.com/overcome-fear-concealed-carrying/#comments Michael Jenkins <p>Not everyone was raised around guns.  In many cases, the first time a person picks up a rifle or pistol it’s usually either in the military or law enforcement training.  For the fortunate few who have either grown up around guns, were involved in athletic shooting competitions, or just had the pleasure of having friends who were familiar with guns, the fear of owning a gun has largely dissipated.</p> <p>But what about carrying concealed everyday?</p> <p>This idea can and does cause lingering anxiety for many of those with a concealed carry permit.  Even though numbers show that a very large number of Americans are joining the ranks of legal concealed carry, many don’t, won’t, or don’t trust themselves or others enough to carry.<br /> Learn That A Firearm Is A Tool<br /> You are the master of the gun that is under your control.  So long as a gun is under your control, it will not negligently discharge.  So far as you obey the principles of firearm safety, you will not injure yourself or others negligently.  If those previous two sentences don’t resonate as a truth, it’s important to take the steps to prepare yourself mentally and physically to overcome them.</p> <p>Become so familiar with your firearm that it is a natural extension of yourself.  This means daily practice, dry firing, shooting at the range, and feeling confident that it’s there with you.<br /> People Largely Don’t Care So Long As You’re Responsible<br /> The great thing about carrying concealed is that the majority of people you encounter will never look at you twice because they think you’re carrying.  As long as you’re not brandishing or printing, the average person has no way of knowing you’re carrying.  And for those who do carry concealed or have a background in military or law enforcement, they’re not worried about you.  So long as what you’re doing is legal, most concealed carriers are more than happy to see there’s others of a similar mind out there.  After all -- the more concealed carriers in an area, the more dangerous it is to be a violent criminal.<br /> Know The Law<br /> The best way of knowing whether or not you’re in the right is to simply know the law.  Each state has its own particular gun laws.  Some are extremely easy to follow and others are super complicated.  It’s your job to know these laws so you can feel confident in carrying your concealed firearm.<br /> If You Don’t Show -- They Don’t Care<br /> This plays off a previous point.  The better concealed your firearm is on your person, the less chance anyone will know you’re carrying.  Research inside the waistband holsters that fit your particular carry style and wear clothes that suit and match that.  If it’s super hot weather outside and you’re just wearing a t-shirt and jeans, that full size 1911 may show up pretty easily.</p> <p>Conversely, if you see a yahoo walking around with a clear print of his everyday carry, it’s not your job to correct him.  You’re not responsible for anyone other than yourself.  Not everyone is like you and some people are just downright daft.  So long as they don’t cause a problem -- don’t cause a problem.</p> <p>In conclusion, the only way to get over the fear of carrying a concealed firearm is to practice it every day.  There’s a strong likelihood you will never need to draw your pistol or even show your permit to anyone.  And as time goes on, you will see that carrying a concealed pistol is only enabling you further to protect yourself and those you love.  It’s a fear worth getting over.</p> <p>Read the original story: <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.usacarry.com/overcome-fear-concealed-carrying/">How to Overcome Your Fear Of Concealed Carrying</a></p> http://www.usacarry.com/overcome-fear-concealed-carrying/feed/ 25 Not everyone was raised around guns.  In many cases, the first time a person picks up a rifle or pistol it’s usually either in the military or law enforcement training.  For the fortunate few who have either grown up around guns, Not everyone was raised around guns.  In many cases, the first time a person picks up a rifle or pistol it’s usually either in the military or law enforcement training.  For the fortunate few who have either grown up around guns, were involved in athletic shooting competitions, or just had the pleasure of having friends who were familiar with guns, the fear of owning a gun has largely dissipated.
But what about carrying concealed everyday?
This idea can and does cause lingering anxiety for many of those with a concealed carry permit.  Even though numbers show that a very large number of Americans are joining the ranks of legal concealed carry, many don’t, won’t, or don’t trust themselves or others enough to carry.
Learn That A Firearm Is A Tool
You are the master of the gun that is under your control.  So long as a gun is under your control, it will not negligently discharge.  So far as you obey the principles of firearm safety, you will not injure yourself or others negligently.  If those previous two sentences don’t resonate as a truth, it’s important to take the steps to prepare yourself mentally and physically to overcome them.
Become so familiar with your firearm that it is a natural extension of yourself.  This means daily practice, dry firing, shooting at the range, and feeling confident that it’s there with you.
People Largely Don’t Care So Long As You’re Responsible
The great thing about carrying concealed is that the majority of people you encounter will never look at you twice because they think you’re carrying.  As long as you’re not brandishing or printing, the average person has no way of knowing you’re carrying.  And for those who do carry concealed or have a background in military or law enforcement, they’re not worried about you.  So long as what you’re doing is legal, most concealed carriers are more than happy to see there’s others of a similar mind out there.  After all — the more concealed carriers in an area, the more dangerous it is to be a violent criminal.
Know The Law
The best way of knowing whether or not you’re in the right is to simply know the law.  Each state has its own particular gun laws.  Some are extremely easy to follow and others are super complicated.  It’s your job to know these laws so you can feel confident in carrying your concealed firearm.
If You Don’t Show — They Don’t Care
This plays off a previous point.  The better concealed your firearm is on your person, the less chance anyone will know you’re carrying.  Research inside the waistband holsters that fit your particular carry style and wear clothes that suit and match that.  If it’s super hot weather outside and you’re just wearing a t-shirt and jeans, that full size 1911 may show up pretty easily.
Conversely, if you see a yahoo walking around with a clear print of his everyday carry, it’s not your job to correct him.  You’re not responsible for anyone other than yourself.  Not everyone is like you and some people are just downright daft.  So long as they don’t cause a problem — don’t cause a problem.
In conclusion, the only way to get over the fear of carrying a concealed firearm is to practice it every day.  There’s a strong likelihood you will never need to draw your pistol or even show your permit to anyone.  And as time goes on, you will see that carrying a concealed pistol is only enabling you further to protect yourself and those you love...]]>
USA Carry Podcast clean 3:45
Should You Carry At Home? - USA Carry Podcast http://www.usacarry.com/should-you-carry-at-home/ Tue, 20 Oct 2015 12:55:53 +0000 http://www.usacarry.com/?p=9433 http://www.usacarry.com/should-you-carry-at-home/#comments Luke McCoy <p>When you get home after a long day at work, if you’re anything like me - you take your concealed carry pistol and holster out and put them in a safe place.  Who wants to walk around the house with a pistol on?  Surely - if you can’t relax at home, where can you?</p> <p>Did you know that the biggest chance you have of ever needing to use that pistol is probably within the radius of your home?</p> <p>In 26.7% of home invasions, the victim was home at the time.  Just about a quarter of those burglaries resulted in violence (26%) against the victim.  So a quarter of a quarter is a very small amount -- but still significant.  (Source: Victimization During Household Burglary, Bureau of Justice Statistics, pg 1, 2003-2007)</p> <p>And despite what you may think, it’s not always in the early morning hours.  Home invasions can occur at any hour in the day.  Intruders will be looking for the most opportune time to break in with little resistance - but that gives them the choice.  One of the things about being on the offensive side of operations is you get to choose the hour and manner of your attack.  It’s the defender’s job to be prepared at any hour.</p> <p>For single females, they experience the highest rate of being home during an unlawful entry - on average 22.6/1,000 households.  (Source: Victimization During Household Burglary, Bureau of Justice Statistics, pg 3, 2003-2007)</p> <p>And above all - you’re more likely to know the person that’s burglarizing your home than it to be done by a total stranger.  <br /> “On average, household members became victims of violent crimes in about 266,560 burglaries annually. Offenders known to their victims accounted for 65% of these burglaries; strangers accounted for 28%.”</p> <p>U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Special Report, National Crime Victimization Survey, Victimization During Household Burglary, September 2010, NCJ 227379, Shannan Catalano, Ph.D., BJS Statistician<br /> Scenario Driven Exercises To Find Your Best Home-Carry Solution<br /> Okay, so we’ve established that being armed at home is probably a good idea.  Because nobody has come up with the magic algorithm to determine who’s house is next for a burglary, preparedness at the home isn’t the worst solution.</p> <p>This gets more complicated in households with small children and a need to secure firearms.  Obviously, when your three-year-old comes running up to you, you’d rather direct your attention thataway.  And it’s not exactly like you can leave your firearm resting on the coffee table while you both settle down to watch some children’s cartoons.  </p> <p>The best method for situations like this is to simply keep the concealed carry firearm in its high-retention holster.  This enables you to go about your daily routines - cooking, cleaning, family time - without worrying about the security of your firearm.</p> <p>Click here for the top 5 firearms for home defense.</p> <p>And what about for couple’s night?  On the occasion you get to just eat a meal in peace with your significant other, you’re probably not interested in keeping your firearm attached to your hip the entire time.</p> <p>Okay, and let’s discuss game day.  Buddies are over and there’s a 6-pack out while you watch the New England Patriots get stomped by the Miami Dolphins.  Alcohol and firearms don’t mix - so what now?</p> <p>There comes a trade-off at some point.</p> <p>You have to determine that trade-off.</p> <p>Whether it’s being responsible and putting the firearm in a safe or keeping it attached to your hip the whole time - you have a multitude of options.  The basics are always this:</p> <p> Keep loaded firearms away from children<br /> Secure your firearms when not in use<br /> Know your own limits -- if you’re going to have a beer (compromise your judgement), the gun should go.</p> <p>Ultimately, you’re in charge of your household.  No matter if you’re a single mother just trying to keep safe i... http://www.usacarry.com/should-you-carry-at-home/feed/ 11 When you get home after a long day at work, if you’re anything like me – you take your concealed carry pistol and holster out and put them in a safe place.  Who wants to walk around the house with a pistol on?  Surely – if you can’t relax at home, When you get home after a long day at work, if you’re anything like me – you take your concealed carry pistol and holster out and put them in a safe place.  Who wants to walk around the house with a pistol on?  Surely – if you can’t relax at home, where can you?
Did you know that the biggest chance you have of ever needing to use that pistol is probably within the radius of your home?
In 26.7% of home invasions, the victim was home at the time.  Just about a quarter of those burglaries resulted in violence (26%) against the victim.  So a quarter of a quarter is a very small amount — but still significant.  (Source: Victimization During Household Burglary, Bureau of Justice Statistics, pg 1, 2003-2007)
And despite what you may think, it’s not always in the early morning hours.  Home invasions can occur at any hour in the day.  Intruders will be looking for the most opportune time to break in with little resistance – but that gives them the choice.  One of the things about being on the offensive side of operations is you get to choose the hour and manner of your attack.  It’s the defender’s job to be prepared at any hour.
For single females, they experience the highest rate of being home during an unlawful entry – on average 22.6/1,000 households.  (Source: Victimization During Household Burglary, Bureau of Justice Statistics, pg 3, 2003-2007)
And above all – you’re more likely to know the person that’s burglarizing your home than it to be done by a total stranger.  
“On average, household members became victims of violent crimes in about 266,560 burglaries annually. Offenders known to their victims accounted for 65% of these burglaries; strangers accounted for 28%.”
U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Special Report, National Crime Victimization Survey, Victimization During Household Burglary, September 2010, NCJ 227379, Shannan Catalano, Ph.D., BJS Statistician
Scenario Driven Exercises To Find Your Best Home-Carry Solution
Okay, so we’ve established that being armed at home is probably a good idea.  Because nobody has come up with the magic algorithm to determine who’s house is next for a burglary, preparedness at the home isn’t the worst solution.
This gets more complicated in households with small children and a need to secure firearms.  Obviously, when your three-year-old comes running up to you, you’d rather direct your attention thataway.  And it’s not exactly like you can leave your firearm resting on the coffee table while you both settle down to watch some children’s cartoons.  
The best method for situations like this is to simply keep the concealed carry firearm in its high-retention holster.  This enables you to go about your daily routines – cooking, cleaning, family time – without worrying about the security of your firearm.
Click here for the top 5 firearms for home defense.
And what about for couple’s night?  On the occasion you get to just eat a meal in peace with your significant other, you’re probably not interested in keeping your firearm attached to your hip the entire time.
Okay, and let’s discuss game day.  Buddies are over and there’s a 6-pack out while you watch the New England Patriots get stomped by the Miami Dolphins.  Alcohol and firearms don’t mix – so what now?
There comes a trade-off at some point.
You have to determine that trade-off.
Whether it’s being responsible and putting the firearm in a safe or keeping it attached to your hip the whole time – you have a multitude of options.  The basics are always this:

]]>
USA Carry Podcast clean 3:52
How To Convince Friends To Carry Concealed - USA Carry Podcast http://www.usacarry.com/how-convince-friends-carry-concealed/ Thu, 08 Oct 2015 13:52:22 +0000 http://www.usacarry.com/?p=9379 http://www.usacarry.com/how-convince-friends-carry-concealed/#comments Luke McCoy <p>You’re an everyday concealed carrier -- good to go!  Hanging out with your friends, you know that if an emergency situation arises, you’re ready and able to protect them and yourself.  That’s a great first step.  Even better is when you’re all carrying concealed.</p> <p>In this article, we’ll talk about a few ways to get your friends into carrying a concealed firearm.<br /> Bring Your Friends To The Range<br /> One of the best ways to get someone accustomed to firearms is getting them to actually fire a gun.  People who are unfamiliar with guns tend to be a bit skittish around them.  They know guns are associated with violence and that sort of programming is embedded in their fine motor skills.  A first time shooter will jump at the sound of a loud bang.  He’ll instinctively close his eyes before squeezing the trigger.  His hands may visibly shake.</p> <p>Once your friend has gotten a chance to actually fire a few handguns in a safe, controlled environment, he’ll begin to really understand that a gun is just a tool.  It’s the person behind the gun and that person’s intent or negligence that determines the rest.  That brings us to the next important point…<br /> Always Reinforce Good Firearm Safety<br /> How do you expect your friends to trust handguns if you don’t set the right example?  If you’re a concealed carrier, you’re an unwitting ambassador to your community in terms of gun rights and the importance of staying responsibly armed.</p> <p>Read Also: NRA's Three Safety Rules</p> <p>One of the best things you can do to inspire your other friends to become concealed carriers is simply setting the right example.  Don’t drink and carry.  Don’t flash your gun around.  Don’t get caught up in petty squabbles and then threaten the other party with your CCW permit.  These are things that make people feel you’re unstable and make them less trusting of the pivotal role firearms play in our society.<br /> Help Them With The Application Process<br /> A lot of the anxiety that arises with becoming a concealed carry permit holder is simply getting to the part where the person gets the permit.  Some states are much more convoluted than others insofar as applying and fulfilling requirements.</p> <p>For more information check out our Concealed Carry Permit Information By State section.</p> <p>Because you’ve already made it through, you’re in a great position to help your friends through this process.  If you’re in a state that requires mandatory CCW training classes, show your friends how they can sign up for a class.</p> <p>Click here for our Firearm Instructor Directory.</p> <p>If you know a CCW training class is coming up, remind your friends that it’s happening.  You don’t have to be pushy, but it’s always nice to know you’ve got someone willing and eager to help.<br /> Once They Become Concealed Carriers, Carry Everyday<br /> Now that you’re close circle of friends all carry concealed, this is a great opportunity to reinforce the everyday carry mentality.</p> <p>Read Also: Why You Should Always Be Carrying</p> <p>Show them that there’s more to an inside the waistband concealed carry holster than just what they see at the gun shop.  Point out why it’s better to use JHP or defensive rounds like HydroShok versus carrying just FMJ.  Get into discussions about best practices when faced in certain situations.</p> <p>Let them learn from the lessons you’ve had to learn and who knows -- maybe you’ll be taking advice from them soon enough!</p> <p>Read the original story: <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.usacarry.com/how-convince-friends-carry-concealed/">How To Convince Friends To Carry Concealed</a></p> http://www.usacarry.com/how-convince-friends-carry-concealed/feed/ 8 You’re an everyday concealed carrier — good to go!  Hanging out with your friends, you know that if an emergency situation arises, you’re ready and able to protect them and yourself.  That’s a great first step. You’re an everyday concealed carrier — good to go!  Hanging out with your friends, you know that if an emergency situation arises, you’re ready and able to protect them and yourself.  That’s a great first step.  Even better is when you’re all carrying concealed.
In this article, we’ll talk about a few ways to get your friends into carrying a concealed firearm.
Bring Your Friends To The Range
One of the best ways to get someone accustomed to firearms is getting them to actually fire a gun.  People who are unfamiliar with guns tend to be a bit skittish around them.  They know guns are associated with violence and that sort of programming is embedded in their fine motor skills.  A first time shooter will jump at the sound of a loud bang.  He’ll instinctively close his eyes before squeezing the trigger.  His hands may visibly shake.
Once your friend has gotten a chance to actually fire a few handguns in a safe, controlled environment, he’ll begin to really understand that a gun is just a tool.  It’s the person behind the gun and that person’s intent or negligence that determines the rest.  That brings us to the next important point…
Always Reinforce Good Firearm Safety
How do you expect your friends to trust handguns if you don’t set the right example?  If you’re a concealed carrier, you’re an unwitting ambassador to your community in terms of gun rights and the importance of staying responsibly armed.
Read Also: NRA’s Three Safety Rules
One of the best things you can do to inspire your other friends to become concealed carriers is simply setting the right example.  Don’t drink and carry.  Don’t flash your gun around.  Don’t get caught up in petty squabbles and then threaten the other party with your CCW permit.  These are things that make people feel you’re unstable and make them less trusting of the pivotal role firearms play in our society.
Help Them With The Application Process
A lot of the anxiety that arises with becoming a concealed carry permit holder is simply getting to the part where the person gets the permit.  Some states are much more convoluted than others insofar as applying and fulfilling requirements.
For more information check out our Concealed Carry Permit Information By State section.
Because you’ve already made it through, you’re in a great position to help your friends through this process.  If you’re in a state that requires mandatory CCW training classes, show your friends how they can sign up for a class.
Click here for our Firearm Instructor Directory.
If you know a CCW training class is coming up, remind your friends that it’s happening.  You don’t have to be pushy, but it’s always nice to know you’ve got someone willing and eager to help.
Once They Become Concealed Carriers, Carry Everyday
Now that you’re close circle of friends all carry concealed, this is a great opportunity to reinforce the everyday carry mentality.
Read Also: Why You Should Always Be Carrying
Show them that there’s more to an inside the waistband concealed carry holster than just what they see at the gun shop.  Point out why it’s better to use JHP or defensive rounds like HydroShok versus carrying just FMJ.  Get into discussions about best practices when faced in certain situations.
Let them learn from the lessons you’ve had to learn and who knows — maybe you’ll be taking advice from them soon enough!
]]>
USA Carry Podcast clean 3:23
How Do You Leave Firearms In The Car Responsibly? - USA Carry Podcast http://www.usacarry.com/leave-firearms-car-responsibly/ Wed, 07 Oct 2015 18:44:10 +0000 http://www.usacarry.com/?p=9374 http://www.usacarry.com/leave-firearms-car-responsibly/#comments Luke McCoy <p>If you’re a daily carrier, it’s just a matter of time before you’ll encounter a place you cannot walk inside with your pistol. For instance, a lot of employers have no problem with an employee locking up his or her firearm in the vehicle - so long as it’s not visible by any passersby.</p> <p>In general, that’s a fantastic idea from the get-go. Never leave firearms visible to someone who passes by. Thieves, when they break in, go for the glove box, center console, and under the seats if they suspect a firearm to be in the vehicle. If they have time, they’ll check the trunk as well.</p> <p>This leaves us in the unfortunate predicament of having to be creative in where we leave our firearms.<br /> Ideal: Locked, Concealed Container Fixed To Interior</p> <p>Companies like Conceal Pro (and others) specialize in custom design concealed compartments which are opened by mechanical means. This means, when closed, they appear no different than any other facet of the vehicle - giving thieves no outward idea that a firearm is stored inside.</p> <p>The companies that specialize in this work generally work with the specific model of your vehicle to ensure that the compartment is flush with the other panels. These compartments are generally opened by a secret button or code. They’re not meant to store your concealed carry pistol while you’re driving - when you may need fast access. Quite literally - they’re for when you need to exit the vehicle and either legally or practically can’t take your firearm with you.</p> <p>For long-term everyday carriers who plan on keeping their vehicle for a while, this option makes the most sense. It’s an investment in responsible storage.<br /> Also Ideal: Locked Safe Box</p> <p>If it’s not practical or possible to install a custom concealed compartment in the vehicle, it’s still affordable to install a vehicle-mounted gun safe perfect for storing a pistol or revolver, such as a Console Vault. While it could still be detected in the event your vehicle is broken into, the thief will consume an inordinate amount of time trying to get that safe out.</p> <p>There’s also the convenience of knowing that when you go to a place where firearms are forbidden - such as a courthouse or a postal office - you’re able to store your pistol safely for that duration.</p> <p>These compartments are also great for storing backup pistol magazines or quick-loaders for revolvers. While it’s generally suggested you always carry a backup pistol magazine for your daily carry concealed pistol, this compartment can also serve as the location for another backup.<br /> Not Ideal: Locked Glovebox, Locked Trunk</p> <p>The glovebox and trunk are not ideal. Both the glovebox and the trunk can be broken into rather easily. A crowbar should be sufficient, in most cases. We do not recommend leaving a gun in any of these places even if it is for a short period of time while you run into the bank, post office or other area that you cannot carry. I hear news reports every week about car robberies where the thieves ran off with someone firearm that was left in the car.</p> <p>Vehicle firearm storage is not for the benefit of your draw or self-defense - it is for the safe, concealed storage of your firearm. If you are in the vehicle, you should have your firearm on you at all times. If you are exiting the vehicle, you should have a locked, secure container to place it inside.</p> <p>Read the original story: <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.usacarry.com/leave-firearms-car-responsibly/">How Do You Leave Firearms In The Car Responsibly?</a></p> http://www.usacarry.com/leave-firearms-car-responsibly/feed/ 18 If you’re a daily carrier, it’s just a matter of time before you’ll encounter a place you cannot walk inside with your pistol. For instance, a lot of employers have no problem with an employee locking up his or her firearm in the vehicle – so long as i... In general, that’s a fantastic idea from the get-go. Never leave firearms visible to someone who passes by. Thieves, when they break in, go for the glove box, center console, and under the seats if they suspect a firearm to be in the vehicle. If they have time, they’ll check the trunk as well.
This leaves us in the unfortunate predicament of having to be creative in where we leave our firearms.
Ideal: Locked, Concealed Container Fixed To Interior

Companies like Conceal Pro (and others) specialize in custom design concealed compartments which are opened by mechanical means. This means, when closed, they appear no different than any other facet of the vehicle – giving thieves no outward idea that a firearm is stored inside.
The companies that specialize in this work generally work with the specific model of your vehicle to ensure that the compartment is flush with the other panels. These compartments are generally opened by a secret button or code. They’re not meant to store your concealed carry pistol while you’re driving – when you may need fast access. Quite literally – they’re for when you need to exit the vehicle and either legally or practically can’t take your firearm with you.
For long-term everyday carriers who plan on keeping their vehicle for a while, this option makes the most sense. It’s an investment in responsible storage.
Also Ideal: Locked Safe Box

If it’s not practical or possible to install a custom concealed compartment in the vehicle, it’s still affordable to install a vehicle-mounted gun safe perfect for storing a pistol or revolver, such as a Console Vault. While it could still be detected in the event your vehicle is broken into, the thief will consume an inordinate amount of time trying to get that safe out.
There’s also the convenience of knowing that when you go to a place where firearms are forbidden – such as a courthouse or a postal office – you’re able to store your pistol safely for that duration.
These compartments are also great for storing backup pistol magazines or quick-loaders for revolvers. While it’s generally suggested you always carry a backup pistol magazine for your daily carry concealed pistol, this compartment can also serve as the location for another backup.
Not Ideal: Locked Glovebox, Locked Trunk

The glovebox and trunk are not ideal. Both the glovebox and the trunk can be broken into rather easily. A crowbar should be sufficient, in most cases. We do not recommend leaving a gun in any of these places even if it is for a short period of time while you run into the bank, post office or other area that you cannot carry. I hear news reports every week about car robberies where the thieves ran off with someone firearm that was left in the car.
Vehicle firearm storage is not for the benefit of your draw or self-defense – it is for the safe, concealed storage of your firearm. If you are in the vehicle, you should have your firearm on you at all times. If you are exiting the vehicle, you should have a locked, secure container to place it inside.
]]>
USA Carry Podcast clean 3:32
Do You Need Concealed Carry Insurance? Comparing a Few of the Top Plans - USA Carry Podcast http://www.usacarry.com/do-you-need-concealed-carry-insurance/ Wed, 30 Sep 2015 17:06:32 +0000 http://www.usacarry.com/?p=9238 http://www.usacarry.com/do-you-need-concealed-carry-insurance/#comments Luke McCoy <p>The topic of whether or not a concealed carrier should get out an insurance policy to protect themselves in the event of a self-defense shooting is certainly a popular one.  And for good reason.  While the vast majority of all concealed carriers will likely never use a firearm to defend themselves - the possibility does exist and it is daunting.</p> <p>As we’ve seen in the news on countless occasions, even if the courts find you innocent of all charges, you could still be liable for civil suits which can bankrupt you.  Additionally, there’s time out of work to consult with legal counsel, court dates, and appointments related to the case.</p> <p>So, in an effort to cut through the haze, we’re looking at a few major concealed carry insurance policies to see how they stack up.  For each, we’re going with the middle option - not bare-bones and not platinum.  We’ll include links so you can investigate on your own and see if this is an option you want.</p> <p>USCCA - Gold Plus Plan</p> <p> Offers up to $575,000 in protection<br /> Annual: $247 [link]<br /> Civil Suit Defense & Damages: $500,000<br /> Criminal Defense Protection & Instant Attorney Retainer: $75,000<br /> Bail Bond Fund: $5,000 (Bond Amount - $50,000)<br /> Compensation While In Court: $350/day</p> <p>Added Features:</p> <p> Critical Response Team<br /> 24/7/365 Immediate Assistance<br /> Complete Attorney Coordination<br /> Local Referral Within 24 Hours<br /> Psychological Support<br /> Post-Incident Counseling</p> <p>NRA Self-Defense Insurance (Lockton Affinity, LLC)</p> <p> Offers up to $250,000 combined single limit with a $50,000 criminal defense reimbursement sub-limit<br /> Annual: $254 [link]</p> <p>This insurance plan covers all components of civil and criminal defense but does not cover little added bonuses like daily compensation or specific mention of bond funds.  Please note that this insurance policy only covers $50,000 in criminal defense reimbursement -- so you’ll have to pay the immediate costs upfront.</p> <p>Opinion:  For $254 a year, this plan seems to offer the base requirements to be reimbursed for the overwhelming fees associated with getting an attorney on retainer.  After acquiring legal counsel, your insurance plan would likely cap out in reimbursement - leaving you stuck with overwhelming court costs and lost time off work.</p> <p>Second Call - Defender Plan (Lockton Affinity, LLC)</p> <p> Annual: $239 (+$60 spouse) [link]<br /> Civil Suit Damages Protection: $50,000<br /> Accidental Shooting Protection: $50,000<br /> Criminal Defense Protection: $50,000*</p> <p>The member’s insurance policy reimburses the Second Amendment foundation upon a not guilty verdict or similar outcome with no criminal charges being made.</p> <p>Added Features:</p> <p> Immediate Cash For Bond: $5,000 for bonds up to $50,000<br /> 24/7 Emergency Legal Hotline<br /> Personal Crisis Manager<br /> Nationwide Attorney Network Access<br /> Local Attorney Referral within 24 hours<br /> Emergency Contact Notification<br /> Expert Witness Coordination<br /> Gun Retrieval or Replacement<br /> Psychological Support - 10 sessions<br /> On-Site Assistance</p> <p>Opinion:  Second Call is offered through the same insurance underwriters as the NRA Self-Defense Insurance.  This means they’re arguable offering the exact same coverage with some added bonuses.  $50,000 goes quick in both civil and criminal cases.  It’s like getting a $5,000 deductible off your car’s collision auto insurance.  More importantly, it really won’t save you in a criminal case or a civil case where real wrongdoing is being alleged.</p> <p>CCW Safe - Individual Plan</p> <p> Annual: $99 [link]<br /> Covers a single person for any criminal, civil or administrative legal action stemming from a self defense incident. Attorneys, Investigators and Expert witnesses are covered. Member does not have to payback any fees.<br /> Covers all uses of deadly force, not just firearms.<br /> http://www.usacarry.com/do-you-need-concealed-carry-insurance/feed/ 35 The topic of whether or not a concealed carrier should get out an insurance policy to protect themselves in the event of a self-defense shooting is certainly a popular one.  And for good reason.  While the vast majority of all concealed carriers will l... The topic of whether or not a concealed carrier should get out an insurance policy to protect themselves in the event of a self-defense shooting is certainly a popular one.  And for good reason.  While the vast majority of all concealed carriers will likely never use a firearm to defend themselves – the possibility does exist and it is daunting.
As we’ve seen in the news on countless occasions, even if the courts find you innocent of all charges, you could still be liable for civil suits which can bankrupt you.  Additionally, there’s time out of work to consult with legal counsel, court dates, and appointments related to the case.
So, in an effort to cut through the haze, we’re looking at a few major concealed carry insurance policies to see how they stack up.  For each, we’re going with the middle option – not bare-bones and not platinum.  We’ll include links so you can investigate on your own and see if this is an option you want.

USCCA – Gold Plus Plan

* Offers up to $575,000 in protection
* Annual: $247 [link]
* Civil Suit Defense & Damages: $500,000
* Criminal Defense Protection & Instant Attorney Retainer: $75,000
* Bail Bond Fund: $5,000 (Bond Amount – $50,000)
* Compensation While In Court: $350/day

Added Features:

* Critical Response Team
* 24/7/365 Immediate Assistance
* Complete Attorney Coordination
* Local Referral Within 24 Hours
* Psychological Support
* Post-Incident Counseling



NRA Self-Defense Insurance (Lockton Affinity, LLC)

* Offers up to $250,000 combined single limit with a $50,000 criminal defense reimbursement sub-limit
* Annual: $254 [link]

This insurance plan covers all components of civil and criminal defense but does not cover little added bonuses like daily compensation or specific mention of bond funds.  Please note that this insurance policy only covers $50,000 in criminal defense reimbursement — so you’ll have to pay the immediate costs upfront.
Opinion:  For $254 a year, this plan seems to offer the base requirements to be reimbursed for the overwhelming fees associated with getting an attorney on retainer.  After acquiring legal counsel, your insurance plan would likely cap out in reimbursement – leaving you stuck with overwhelming court costs and lost time off work.



Second Call – Defender Plan (Lockton Affinity, LLC)

* Annual: $239 (+$60 spouse) [link]
* Civil Suit Damages Protection: $50,000
* Accidental Shooting Protection: $50,000
* Criminal Defense Protection: $50,000*

The member’s insurance policy reimburses the Second Amendment foundation upon a not guilty verdict or similar outcome with no criminal charges being made.
Added Features:

* Immediate Cash For Bond: $5,000 for bonds up to $50,000
* 24/7 Emergency Legal Hotline
* Personal Crisis Manager
* Nationwide Attorney Network Access
* Local Attorney Referral within 24 hours
...]]>
USA Carry Podcast clean 5:51
USA Carry Gun Belt Review - USA Carry Podcast http://www.usacarry.com/usa-carry-gun-belt-review/ Tue, 29 Sep 2015 17:17:46 +0000 http://www.usacarry.com/?p=9228 http://www.usacarry.com/usa-carry-gun-belt-review/#comments Ben Findley <p>When it comes to carrying a handgun, without a doubt a strong, high quality belt makes a major difference. Some even suggest that it is even more important than the holster. I believe that both are certainly important for effectively and safely carrying a handgun, especially concealed. So my goal is to use a high-quality gun belt that provides strong support and security for my handgun and which is comfortable to wear for a long time throughout the day. Also, I prefer the qualities of full grain and top grain leathers and do not want to pay over $80 for the gun belt.</p> <p>Recently, I had a "leather experience" I want to share with you so you can learn from my mistake. About 3 years ago I purchased a very nice looking "leather" chair for my office from a reputable, national chain store at a very low steal of a price deal. (I forgot you usually get what you pay for and appearance is just one factor to consider.) The first year it looked great and worked well for my routine use and did not have any problems with wear and performance. The second year I started noticing a few slight imperfections began to appear. Well now three years later as I sit in it, the leather on one chair arm and the leather on the seat is deteriorating very badly with small rips. There is a noticeable sag in the seat and support has lessened. I should mention I do not practice cliff diving off the arms of my chair, nor do I stack 50 gallon drums on the seat. Really, below average use. Some parts of the chair were vinyl and not leather at all. This week I will replace it with a full grain or top grain leather chair, but it is going to cost me. Once a rip gets started, you cannot prevent it and the space grows larger, looks bad, and does not give you the required support. I mention this experience because it directly relates to selecting leather for your gun belt. I learned some lessons and have refined my criteria about leather. I want to share them to help you with your gun belt selection.</p> <p>Basically, there are 4 types of leather. Full Grain is top-quality and one of the best leathers money can buy, comes from the top layer of the hide, lasts a long time, and costs more. It is tanned with high-grade oils and preservatives to keep it from being destroyed by dryness and moisture. Top Grain leather is very good, strong and durable, is usually split from the top layer, then sanded and refinished, and has many strong qualities and features with some of the grain left on the top after grain was sanded off to get rid of the scars and character. It is more reasonably priced for the features, but MAY not age as nicely with use as Full Grain. Genuine Leather comes from the bottom half of the hide, does not have any grain or very minimal, and while it generally looks good and the name sounds great, usually performs at an average (or sometimes below) acceptable level, but it is lower priced and absent certain qualities. Suede is an example of Genuine Leather. Bonded Leather (e.g. my office chair) is pressed or bonded together bits, pieces, shavings, and dust particles of leather glued and pressed together flat. A very low-quality pressed leather with not many durable and natural features. Genuine and Bonded leather is usually spray-painted to look good like Full or Top Grain Leather. The difference between high and low grade leather is like the difference between a Porsche 911 and a Dodge La Femme. Be careful and choose wisely.</p> <p>So here are my criteria and then my evaluation of the USA Carry gun belt.</p> <p>MY 10 CRITERIA, worth 10 maximum points each on my scale of 1 to 10, with 10 being the highest value for each criterion. The total possible for all 10 criteria then is 100 points: </p> <p> Minimizes Movement of my weapon; enhances stability and gun security;<br /> Quality Workmanship- Excellent Fit and Finish. Looks great and sturdy. Design and construction assists with keeping my handgun close to my body; Double-Stitching (and thick stitches)... http://www.usacarry.com/usa-carry-gun-belt-review/feed/ 14 When it comes to carrying a handgun, without a doubt a strong, high quality belt makes a major difference. Some even suggest that it is even more important than the holster. I believe that both are certainly important for effectively and safely carryin...
When it comes to carrying a handgun, without a doubt a strong, high quality belt makes a major difference. Some even suggest that it is even more important than the holster. I believe that both are certainly important for effectively and safely carrying a handgun, especially concealed. So my goal is to use a high-quality gun belt that provides strong support and security for my handgun and which is comfortable to wear for a long time throughout the day. Also, I prefer the qualities of full grain and top grain leathers and do not want to pay over $80 for the gun belt.
Recently, I had a “leather experience” I want to share with you so you can learn from my mistake. About 3 years ago I purchased a very nice looking “leather” chair for my office from a reputable, national chain store at a very low steal of a price deal. (I forgot you usually get what you pay for and appearance is just one factor to consider.) The first year it looked great and worked well for my routine use and did not have any problems with wear and performance. The second year I started noticing a few slight imperfections began to appear. Well now three years later as I sit in it, the leather on one chair arm and the leather on the seat is deteriorating very badly with small rips. There is a noticeable sag in the seat and support has lessened. I should mention I do not practice cliff diving off the arms of my chair, nor do I stack 50 gallon drums on the seat. Really, below average use. Some parts of the chair were vinyl and not leather at all. This week I will replace it with a full grain or top grain leather chair, but it is going to cost me. Once a rip gets started, you cannot prevent it and the space grows larger, looks bad, and does not give you the required support. I mention this experience because it directly relates to selecting leather for your gun belt. I learned some lessons and have refined my criteria about leather. I want to share them to help you with your gun belt selection.
Basically, there are 4 types of leather. Full Grain is top-quality and one of the best leathers money can buy, comes from the top layer of the hide, lasts a long time, and costs more. It is tanned with high-grade oils and preservatives to keep it from being destroyed by dryness and moisture. Top Grain leather is very good, strong and durable, is usually split from the top layer, then sanded and refinished, and has many strong qualities and features with some of the grain left on the top after grain was sanded off to get rid of the scars and character. It is more reasonably priced for the features, but MAY not age as nicely with use as Full Grain. Genuine Leather comes from the bottom half of the hide, does not have any grain or very minimal, and while it generally looks good and the name sounds great, usually performs at an average (or sometimes below) acceptable level, but it is lower priced and absent certain qualities. Suede is an example of Genuine Leather. Bonded Leather (e.g. my office chair) is pressed or bonded together bits, pieces, shavings, and dust particles of leather glued and pressed together flat. A very low-quality pressed leather with not many durable and natural features. Genuine and Bonded leather is usually spray-painted to look good like Full or Top Grain Leather. The difference between high and low grade leather is like the difference between a Porsche 911 and a Dodge La Femme. Be careful and choose wisely.
So here are my criteria and then my evaluation of the USA Carry gun belt.
MY 10 CRITERIA, worth 10 maximum points each on my scale of 1 to 10, with 10 being the highest value for each criterion. The total possible for all 10 criteria then is 100 points: 

* Minimizes Movement of my weapon; enhances stability and gun security;<...]]>
USA Carry Podcast clean 9:17
Top 10 CCW Firearms For Ambidextrous Shooters - USA Carry Podcast http://www.usacarry.com/top-10-ccw-firearms-ambidextrous-shooters/ Thu, 24 Sep 2015 14:10:46 +0000 http://www.usacarry.com/?p=9209 http://www.usacarry.com/top-10-ccw-firearms-ambidextrous-shooters/#comments Luke McCoy <p>Read the original story: <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.usacarry.com/top-10-ccw-firearms-ambidextrous-shooters/">Top 10 CCW Firearms For Ambidextrous Shooters</a></p> http://www.usacarry.com/top-10-ccw-firearms-ambidextrous-shooters/feed/ 10 First, what makes a gun ambidextrous?
Magazine ejection – is it accessible from the left or right hand?
Safety – can it be accessed easily from either side?
In the vast majority of cases, those two qualifiers are the judge as to whether a firearm is ambidextrous.  And while it seems absolutely silly in this age of modern firearms to design a gun that only works in one configuration – it still happens.  Why?  Because the majority of the market share is right-handed and gun engineers are largely unambitious when it comes to changing the actual mechanics of a pistol that’s worked for nearly thirty years.
This touches on the last part about modern pistols and revolvers – they really haven’t advanced in the past thirty years.  Outside of using polymers to reduce weight, magazine extension, and some adjustable sights – a firearm that you picked up from 1985 will largely operate the same as the firearm you’ll pick up in 2015.  The big exception to this is the striker-fire.  That has come forward in leaps and bounds within the past thirty years.  But that’s a topic for a different article.
That said, let’s go over ten pistols and revolvers that exhibit good ambidextrous control.
 
Smith & Wesson J Frame

It’s a small, snub-nosed .38 special or, ideally, .357 Magnum that holds five rounds.  In terms of a self-defense concealed carry revolver, it’s near the ideal.  The J Frame can be gripped with one hand or two and conceals easily in the waistline for smooth performance.  With single action/double action, the user can still have single action shot performance with double action follow-up.
Beretta Nano

Small modular design, nice ergonomics, and built for concealability – the magazine ejection is accessible by either side and there is no mechanical safety on most models.  It’s modular structure encourages concealed carriers to experiment with its configuration to find the perfect grip, sight, and hand configuration for each carrier.
Chiappa Rhino 2”

The Chiappa Rhino 2” is one of the most curious designs we’ve seen for a concealed carry revolver.  Made with a flattened cylinder, it uses moon clips to quickly load and unload ammunition into its hexagonal cylinder.  Because it’s very streamlined and compact, it brings all the benefits of a SA/DA pistol and a revolver to the same platform.
Glock 19

Even though the magazine well is designed for a right-handed shooter, it’s actually in a great position to be accessed with either hand.  Plus, what list of great ambidextrous pistols is complete without a Glock 19?  It’s a bit less compact than the G26 and for those looking for an ideal model of Glock for ambidextrous use, the G26 is probably the way to go.  If, however, you can get away with a full-size Glock – you’ll never regret it.
Walther PPS

Slim, single-stack, and ambidextrous magazine release on the trigger guard – the Walther PPS is a great choice for concealed carriers who need to switch hands.  While some models include a safety on the left side of the gun (ideal for right-handed thumb flip), that safety is easily accessed with just the left hand.  This is one of the few 9mm pistols which can be safely fired single handedly by almost any shooter that practices it.
Click here for the last 5 guns on the list.



Sig Sauer P938

Sig Sauer doesn’t make a lot of ambidextrous pistols but they do design their pistols with controls that can be conveniently learned by southpaws.  That said, one of their finest sub-compact SA/DA pistols is the P938.  It can be used in either hand with equal effect – good concise accuracy,]]>
USA Carry Podcast clean 5:57
Florida Approves 7,549 CCW Licenses for Military and Vets in 60 Days - USA Carry Podcast http://www.usacarry.com/florida-approves-7549-ccw-licenses-military-vets-60-days/ Wed, 23 Sep 2015 23:56:54 +0000 http://www.usacarry.com/?p=9198 http://www.usacarry.com/florida-approves-7549-ccw-licenses-military-vets-60-days/#comments Luke McCoy <p>Less than a month after the attack in Chattanooga, Florida Senator Rand Paul introduced an amendment to the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act, which would amend permit members of the armed forces to possess firearms on military installations in accordance with applicable state and local law.<br /> “I find it ridiculous that the brave men and women serving in our armed forces are asked to defend us overseas but cannot protect themselves once they return home. My amendment ensures that our honorable service members are allowed to protect themselves while serving our nation at home,” Sen. Paul said.<br /> Soon after that Florida Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam made the decision to expedite all Florida concealed weapon or firearm license applications submitted by active military members and veterans.</p> <p>From the Florida Concealed Weapon License Website:</p> <p>Note to Military Members and Veterans<br /> The department is now expediting all Florida concealed weapon or firearm license applications submitted by active military members and veterans.</p> <p>Active military personnel who want to apply for a concealed weapon license should include a copy of their Common Access Card or other form of official military identification with their applications. The department will also accept a copy of service members' current orders as proof of active duty status.</p> <p>Honorably discharged veterans should submit a copy of their DD 214 long form with their applications.<br /> And they definitely meant it. Within 60 days they approved 7,549 concealed weapon licenses for military personnel and vets. That's a whopping pace of 125 licenses per day. Their normal processing time is within 90 days. The worked on a business model that would cut that turnaround time down to 30 days. Well, whatever they did worked because the average processing time right now is roughly 6 days.</p> <p>So if you are in the military or you are a veteran and are interested in getting your Florida Concealed Weapons Permit, now is the time to apply. Including what is listed above, active-duty military personnel may submit copies of any of the following documents that confirm your experience with a firearm gained during your service:</p> <p> military orders including call to active-duty letter;<br /> a statement of military service signed by, or at the direction of, the adjutant, personnel officer, or commander of your unit or higher headquarters which identifies you and provides your date of entry on your current active-duty period;</p> <p>Former military personnel can submit a DD 214 long form reflecting honorable discharge from military service.</p> <p>And Florida offers resident and non-resident permits.</p> <p>For more information on how to obtain your Florida Concealed Weapons permit click here.</p> <p>Read the original story: <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.usacarry.com/florida-approves-7549-ccw-licenses-military-vets-60-days/">Florida Approves 7,549 CCW Licenses for Military and Vets in 60 Days</a></p> http://www.usacarry.com/florida-approves-7549-ccw-licenses-military-vets-60-days/feed/ 3 Less than a month after the attack in Chattanooga, Florida Senator Rand Paul introduced an amendment to the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act, which would amend permit members of the armed forces to possess firearms on military installations in acc... Less than a month after the attack in Chattanooga, Florida Senator Rand Paul introduced an amendment to the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act, which would amend permit members of the armed forces to possess firearms on military installations in accordance with applicable state and local law.
“I find it ridiculous that the brave men and women serving in our armed forces are asked to defend us overseas but cannot protect themselves once they return home. My amendment ensures that our honorable service members are allowed to protect themselves while serving our nation at home,” Sen. Paul said.
Soon after that Florida Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam made the decision to expedite all Florida concealed weapon or firearm license applications submitted by active military members and veterans.
From the Florida Concealed Weapon License Website:

Note to Military Members and Veterans
The department is now expediting all Florida concealed weapon or firearm license applications submitted by active military members and veterans.
Active military personnel who want to apply for a concealed weapon license should include a copy of their Common Access Card or other form of official military identification with their applications. The department will also accept a copy of service members’ current orders as proof of active duty status.
Honorably discharged veterans should submit a copy of their DD 214 long form with their applications.
And they definitely meant it. Within 60 days they approved 7,549 concealed weapon licenses for military personnel and vets. That’s a whopping pace of 125 licenses per day. Their normal processing time is within 90 days. The worked on a business model that would cut that turnaround time down to 30 days. Well, whatever they did worked because the average processing time right now is roughly 6 days.
So if you are in the military or you are a veteran and are interested in getting your Florida Concealed Weapons Permit, now is the time to apply. Including what is listed above, active-duty military personnel may submit copies of any of the following documents that confirm your experience with a firearm gained during your service:

* military orders including call to active-duty letter;
* a statement of military service signed by, or at the direction of, the adjutant, personnel officer, or commander of your unit or higher headquarters which identifies you and provides your date of entry on your current active-duty period;

Former military personnel can submit a DD 214 long form reflecting honorable discharge from military service.
And Florida offers resident and non-resident permits.
For more information on how to obtain your Florida Concealed Weapons permit click here.
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USA Carry Podcast clean 3:22
Did You Know That Your Texas Concealed Handgun License is Now a Valid Proof of Identification? - USA Carry Podcast http://www.usacarry.com/texas-concealed-handgun-license-valid-id/ Wed, 23 Sep 2015 21:28:16 +0000 http://www.usacarry.com/?p=9195 http://www.usacarry.com/texas-concealed-handgun-license-valid-id/#comments Luke McCoy <p>Do you have a Texas Concealed Handgun License?</p> <p>Did you realize that it is now a valid form of identification?</p> <p>House Bill 2739 (see the full text below) went into effect on September 1, 2015. What this does is amend the Business and Commerce Code which now requires Texas businesses to accept a Texas Concealed Handgun License as a valid form of personal identification for access to goods, services, or facilities.</p> <p>Three things this House Bill does NOT affect are:</p> <p> Laws requiring a driver license to operate a motor vehicle.<br /> The existing requirement to present a driver license when renting a car.<br /> The type of identification required under federal law to access airport premises or to pass through airport security.</p> <p>Now that you are able to use it as a form of identification, the question is, SHOULD YOU? Personally I wouldn't use my concealed carry permit or license (depending on the state you are in) as a form of identification. To me this would be the same as telling someone I am carrying concealed. I prefer to carry concealed for just that reason, so no one knows I have a handgun on me. I don't want to get into the open carry vs. concealed carry debate. This is just my own personal preference.</p> <p>But it is good to know that as a last resort, if for some reason you didn't have your driver's license on you but did have your Texas Concealed Handgun License on you, then you could use it as a form of identification.</p> <p>Click here for more information on obtaining a Texas Concealed Handgun License.</p> <p>Read the original story: <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.usacarry.com/texas-concealed-handgun-license-valid-id/">Did You Know That Your Texas Concealed Handgun License is Now a Valid Proof of Identification?</a></p> http://www.usacarry.com/texas-concealed-handgun-license-valid-id/feed/ 8 Do you have a Texas Concealed Handgun License? Did you realize that it is now a valid form of identification? House Bill 2739 (see the full text below) went into effect on September 1, 2015. What this does is amend the Business and Commerce Code which ... Do you have a Texas Concealed Handgun License?
Did you realize that it is now a valid form of identification?
House Bill 2739 (see the full text below) went into effect on September 1, 2015. What this does is amend the Business and Commerce Code which now requires Texas businesses to accept a Texas Concealed Handgun License as a valid form of personal identification for access to goods, services, or facilities.
Three things this House Bill does NOT affect are:

* Laws requiring a driver license to operate a motor vehicle.
* The existing requirement to present a driver license when renting a car.
* The type of identification required under federal law to access airport premises or to pass through airport security.

Now that you are able to use it as a form of identification, the question is, SHOULD YOU? Personally I wouldn’t use my concealed carry permit or license (depending on the state you are in) as a form of identification. To me this would be the same as telling someone I am carrying concealed. I prefer to carry concealed for just that reason, so no one knows I have a handgun on me. I don’t want to get into the open carry vs. concealed carry debate. This is just my own personal preference.
But it is good to know that as a last resort, if for some reason you didn’t have your driver’s license on you but did have your Texas Concealed Handgun License on you, then you could use it as a form of identification.
Click here for more information on obtaining a Texas Concealed Handgun License.

Download (PDF, Unknown)
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USA Carry Podcast clean 2:19
Are You Prepared to Use Your Gun? - USA Carry Podcast http://www.usacarry.com/are-you-prepared-to-use-your-gun/ Wed, 23 Sep 2015 19:14:41 +0000 http://www.usacarry.com/?p=9163 http://www.usacarry.com/are-you-prepared-to-use-your-gun/#comments Luke McCoy <p>So you've decided to get your concealed carry permit and carry a gun for self defense. For those of you in states that require permits, you go through the required training, fill out the forms and pay the fees. You anxiously wait for your permit to arrive like Ralphie in The Christmas Story waiting for his secret decoder pin. Once it finally arrives you realize now you can finally carry concealed.</p> <p>Some of you may head over to your favorite firearms forum and post that your permit arrived (like I've seen time and time again). I've also seen a lot of people post that they feel awkward or paranoid carrying concealed for the first time. While it can feel awkward carrying for the first time, it can be expected. Not to put driving a car and carrying a gun into the same category but I bet you also felt awkward driving at first after getting your drivers license. It takes time and practice getting used to new habits.</p> <p>But two things to think about before getting your permit is:</p> <p> Would you actually be prepared to use your firearm if needed?<br /> Do you have the proper training to use your firearm in a self defense situation?</p> <p>In a recent news story, a man was "getting rough" with a female friend of a 23 year old women. She decided to pull her handgun. The man then proceeded to take her gun, beat both women with the gun and shoot the 23 year old that pulled the gun twice in the chest.</p> <p>While we do not know the exact circumstances of this situation, it does show that simply having a gun won't keep you safe. If you are not prepared to use the gun when the situation arises, it is possible that the gun you purchased and carry for self defense could be taken from you and used against you.</p> <p>From Massad Ayoob’s 10 Commandments Of Concealed Carry:<br /> COMMANDMENT II:</p> <p>Don’t Carry A Gun If You Aren’t Prepared To Use It</p> <p>The gun is not a magic talisman that wards off evil. It is a special-purpose emergency rescue tool: no more, no less. History shows us that—for police and for armed citizens alike—the mere drawing of the gun ends the great majority of criminal threats, with the offender either surrendering or running away. However, you must always remember that criminals constitute an armed subculture themselves, living in an underworld awash with stolen, illegal weapons. They don’t fear the gun; they fear the resolutely armed man or woman pointing that gun at them. And, being predators, they are expert judges of what is prey and what is a creature more dangerous to them than what they had thought a moment ago was their prey. Thus, the great irony: the person who is prepared to kill if they must to stop a murderous transgression by a human predator is the person who is least likely to have to do so.<br /> Training and practice is also a big part of the decision to carry concealed. My firearms training during and after being in the military imparted the idea that practicing helps build "muscle memory." So once you are in the "fight or flight" mode, that "muscle memory" should kick in and help you in that situation. I'm not saying that your muscles will actually remember the training and practice you've went through but it should help your mind respond to that situation. I was always told by my instructors that you will resort to your training in a self defense situation.</p> <p>I've read some arguments about whether or not this "muscle memory" will help in a self defense situation. Personally, I can't see how it would hurt so why not practice? Whether that means you take high end training classes every month or just do some home dry firing drills, that is up to you.</p> <p>The main point is that you want to be mentally prepared to use your gun in a self defense situation.</p> <p>See Also: Concealed Carry Drills Test | USA Carry’s Guide to Dry Practice</p> <p>Read the original story: <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.usacarry.com/are-you-prepared-to-use-your-gun/">Are You Prepared to Use ... http://www.usacarry.com/are-you-prepared-to-use-your-gun/feed/ 4 So you’ve decided to get your concealed carry permit and carry a gun for self defense. For those of you in states that require permits, you go through the required training, fill out the forms and pay the fees. So you’ve decided to get your concealed carry permit and carry a gun for self defense. For those of you in states that require permits, you go through the required training, fill out the forms and pay the fees. You anxiously wait for your permit to arrive like Ralphie in The Christmas Story waiting for his secret decoder pin. Once it finally arrives you realize now you can finally carry concealed.
Some of you may head over to your favorite firearms forum and post that your permit arrived (like I’ve seen time and time again). I’ve also seen a lot of people post that they feel awkward or paranoid carrying concealed for the first time. While it can feel awkward carrying for the first time, it can be expected. Not to put driving a car and carrying a gun into the same category but I bet you also felt awkward driving at first after getting your drivers license. It takes time and practice getting used to new habits.
But two things to think about before getting your permit is:

* Would you actually be prepared to use your firearm if needed?
* Do you have the proper training to use your firearm in a self defense situation?

In a recent news story, a man was “getting rough” with a female friend of a 23 year old women. She decided to pull her handgun. The man then proceeded to take her gun, beat both women with the gun and shoot the 23 year old that pulled the gun twice in the chest.
While we do not know the exact circumstances of this situation, it does show that simply having a gun won’t keep you safe. If you are not prepared to use the gun when the situation arises, it is possible that the gun you purchased and carry for self defense could be taken from you and used against you.
From Massad Ayoob’s 10 Commandments Of Concealed Carry:
COMMANDMENT II:
Don’t Carry A Gun If You Aren’t Prepared To Use It
The gun is not a magic talisman that wards off evil. It is a special-purpose emergency rescue tool: no more, no less. History shows us that—for police and for armed citizens alike—the mere drawing of the gun ends the great majority of criminal threats, with the offender either surrendering or running away. However, you must always remember that criminals constitute an armed subculture themselves, living in an underworld awash with stolen, illegal weapons. They don’t fear the gun; they fear the resolutely armed man or woman pointing that gun at them. And, being predators, they are expert judges of what is prey and what is a creature more dangerous to them than what they had thought a moment ago was their prey. Thus, the great irony: the person who is prepared to kill if they must to stop a murderous transgression by a human predator is the person who is least likely to have to do so.
Training and practice is also a big part of the decision to carry concealed. My firearms training during and after being in the military imparted the idea that practicing helps build “muscle memory.” So once you are in the “fight or flight” mode, that “muscle memory” should kick in and help you in that situation. I’m not saying that your muscles will actually remember the training and practice you’ve went through but it should help your mind respond to that situation. I was always told by my instructors that you will resort to your training in a self defense situation.
I’ve read some arguments about whether or not this &#...]]>
USA Carry Podcast clean 4:02
CPL Holder Shoots Potential Carjacker - USA Carry Podcast http://www.usacarry.com/cpl-holder-shoots-potential-carjacker/ Wed, 23 Sep 2015 13:33:55 +0000 http://www.usacarry.com/?p=9169 http://www.usacarry.com/cpl-holder-shoots-potential-carjacker/#comments Luke McCoy <p>Detroit, MI - A man in his 40's pulled up to a popular BP gas station at 6:40 AM on Tuesday to pump up the tires in his green Buick. That's when a man walked up and said to the owner of the car, "I'll kill you". A scuffle ensued then the carjacker hopped into the car and "attempted" to steal it.</p> <p>What this carjacker didn't realize is that the owner of the car had a valid CPL license on him along with a handgun.  Feeling that his life was in danger, the CPL holder fired into the car hitting the carjacker while he apparently backed the car up into a pole that was protecting the pump. The wounded man then walked off into the neighborhood.</p> <p>The CPL holder stayed on scene and cooperated with police who were there reviewing security footage and trying to locate the wounded carjacker.</p> <p>So for all of the people that say concealed carriers do not thwart attacks, here is another example to prove you wrong. This is just another reason of why you should always carry.</p> <p>Read Also: How to Avoid Getting Attacked in Your Car</p> <p>Read the original story: <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.usacarry.com/cpl-holder-shoots-potential-carjacker/">CPL Holder Shoots Potential Carjacker</a></p> http://www.usacarry.com/cpl-holder-shoots-potential-carjacker/feed/ 8 Detroit, MI – A man in his 40’s pulled up to a popular BP gas station at 6:40 AM on Tuesday to pump up the tires in his green Buick. That’s when a man walked up and said to the owner of the car, “I’ll kill you”.
Detroit, MI – A man in his 40’s pulled up to a popular BP gas station at 6:40 AM on Tuesday to pump up the tires in his green Buick. That’s when a man walked up and said to the owner of the car, “I’ll kill you”. A scuffle ensued then the carjacker hopped into the car and “attempted” to steal it.
What this carjacker didn’t realize is that the owner of the car had a valid CPL license on him along with a handgun.  Feeling that his life was in danger, the CPL holder fired into the car hitting the carjacker while he apparently backed the car up into a pole that was protecting the pump. The wounded man then walked off into the neighborhood.
The CPL holder stayed on scene and cooperated with police who were there reviewing security footage and trying to locate the wounded carjacker.
So for all of the people that say concealed carriers do not thwart attacks, here is another example to prove you wrong. This is just another reason of why you should always carry.
Read Also: How to Avoid Getting Attacked in Your Car
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USA Carry Podcast clean 1:39
Armed Homeowner Warns Intruder Twice then Critically Shoots Him - USA Carry Podcast http://www.usacarry.com/armed-homeowner-warns-intruder-twice-then-critically-shoots-him/ Wed, 23 Sep 2015 03:06:11 +0000 http://www.usacarry.com/?p=9159 http://www.usacarry.com/armed-homeowner-warns-intruder-twice-then-critically-shoots-him/#comments Luke McCoy <p>PHOENIX, AZ - On the morning of September 22nd, 2015, around 10:20 AM, a Phoenix homeowner in his 60's heard the sound of one of his windows being broken into. He retrieved his firearm and warned the intruder twice that he was armed before proceeding to shoot him.<br /> "The homeowner reported perceiving a threat and fired at the subject, striking him," police said in a statement."<br /> The wounded intruder got away on foot over the backyard fence but didn't get to far. Emergency personnel found him lying in an alley about 5 houses away in extremely critical condition. He was then rushed to the hospital.</p> <p>Read Also: Why You Should Always Be Carrying</p> <p>Arizona is a state with a castle doctrine law:<br /> "A. A person is justified in threatening or using both physical force and deadly physical force against another if and to the extent the person reasonably believes that physical force or deadly physical force is immediately necessary to prevent the other's commission of arson of an occupied structure under section 13‑1704, burglary in the second or first degree under section 13‑1507 or 13‑1508, kidnapping under section 13‑1304, manslaughter under section 13‑1103, second or first degree murder under section 13‑1104 or 13‑1105, sexual conduct with a minor under section 13‑1405, sexual assault under section 13‑1406, child molestation under section 13‑1410, armed robbery under section 13‑1904, or aggravated assault under section 13‑1204, subsection A, paragraphs 1 and 2. B. There is no duty to retreat before threatening or using physical force or deadly physical force justified by subsection A of this section. C. A person is presumed to be acting reasonably for the purposes of this section if he the person is acting to prevent the commission of any of the offenses listed in subsection A of this section. D. This section is not limited to the use or threatened use of physical or deadly physical force in a person's home, residence, place of business, land the person owns or leases, conveyance of any kind, or any other place in this state where a person has a right to be."</p> <p>Read the original story: <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.usacarry.com/armed-homeowner-warns-intruder-twice-then-critically-shoots-him/">Armed Homeowner Warns Intruder Twice then Critically Shoots Him</a></p> http://www.usacarry.com/armed-homeowner-warns-intruder-twice-then-critically-shoots-him/feed/ 3 PHOENIX, AZ – On the morning of September 22nd, 2015, around 10:20 AM, a Phoenix homeowner in his 60’s heard the sound of one of his windows being broken into. He retrieved his firearm and warned the intruder twice that he was armed before proceeding t...
PHOENIX, AZ – On the morning of September 22nd, 2015, around 10:20 AM, a Phoenix homeowner in his 60’s heard the sound of one of his windows being broken into. He retrieved his firearm and warned the intruder twice that he was armed before proceeding to shoot him.
“The homeowner reported perceiving a threat and fired at the subject, striking him,” police said in a statement.”
The wounded intruder got away on foot over the backyard fence but didn’t get to far. Emergency personnel found him lying in an alley about 5 houses away in extremely critical condition. He was then rushed to the hospital.
Read Also: Why You Should Always Be Carrying
Arizona is a state with a castle doctrine law:
“A. A person is justified in threatening or using both physical force and deadly physical force against another if and to the extent the person reasonably believes that physical force or deadly physical force is immediately necessary to prevent the other’s commission of arson of an occupied structure under section 13‑1704, burglary in the second or first degree under section 13‑1507 or 13‑1508, kidnapping under section 13‑1304, manslaughter under section 13‑1103, second or first degree murder under section 13‑1104 or 13‑1105, sexual conduct with a minor under section 13‑1405, sexual assault under section 13‑1406, child molestation under section 13‑1410, armed robbery under section 13‑1904, or aggravated assault under section 13‑1204, subsection A, paragraphs 1 and 2. B. There is no duty to retreat before threatening or using physical force or deadly physical force justified by subsection A of this section. C. A person is presumed to be acting reasonably for the purposes of this section if he the person is acting to prevent the commission of any of the offenses listed in subsection A of this section. D. This section is not limited to the use or threatened use of physical or deadly physical force in a person’s home, residence, place of business, land the person owns or leases, conveyance of any kind, or any other place in this state where a person has a right to be.”
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USA Carry Podcast clean 1:25
5 Concealed Carry Blogs And Channels You Should Follow Now - USA Carry Podcast http://www.usacarry.com/5-concealed-carry-blogs-channels-follow/ Tue, 22 Sep 2015 16:34:58 +0000 http://www.usacarry.com/?p=9153 http://www.usacarry.com/5-concealed-carry-blogs-channels-follow/#comments Luke McCoy <p>We always hope you enjoy coming to USA Carry to learn and discuss more about concealed carrying. However, there’s a lot of other opinions and ideas floating out there and we wanted to show you some that sure entertained us.<br /> Mr. Colion Noir -- Smart, Sensible Take On Gun Matters<br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hR3t7j2tUec</p> <p>Mr. Colion Noir quickly grew in popularity in the concealed carry community because he addressed the pressing issues facing us. Namely, how we can do more to prevent mass shootings, decypher the politics surrounding guns, and encourage people to act responsibly. He is also an NRA News Commentator and the host of NOIR. You can follow him on Youtube, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and his own website, Mr. Colion Noir (coming soon).<br /> Yankee Marshal -- Quick-Witted Southern Take On Guns<br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nRV3wQiiWE0</p> <p>Not everyone agrees with the Yankee Marshal. He’s opinionated, has prior law enforcement experience, and lives in Oregon -- far from his Southern roots. While his politics tend to lean conservative, he has some surprisingly open-minded takes on the politics as it relates to the shooter and his responsibilities. Not every video you’ll agree with, but you’ll definitely see he takes safety seriously and the rest is up for laughs and good-hearted debate. You can follow the Yankee Marshal on Youtube, Facebook and Instagram.<br /> Concealed Nation -- Advocating For Responsible CCW<br /> Concealed Nation has always stuck to their guns - no pun intended - in maintaining that concealed carriers have a responsibility to be knowledgeable about the law, train how they intend to fight, and maintaining constant situational awareness. One of the unique things about Concealed Nation is they’re extremely good at covering actual concealed carry events in the news and reporting them for their audience. This helps keep people aware that proper training and a good mindset will go a long way in staying safe. We like them so much, sometimes we share their articles. You can follow them at their website Concealed Nation, Facebook, Twitter, Youtube and Instagram.<br /> Hickok45 -- Humble, Friendly Tester Of All Guns Big And Small<br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=19ajx2X1RqA</p> <p>Hickok45 comes across as one of the most genuine, laid-back, down-to-earth gun enthusiasts out there. If you can think of a firearm, chances are good somewhere in his channel he’s tried it. Each firearm he uses, he evaluates and shows its capabilities and limitations. Before purchasing a pistol or revolver outright, check to see if he’s done a review of it. You can follow him on Youtube, Facebook and Twitter.<br /> USA Carry -- Daily Topics And Audio<br /> Not trying to toot our own horn, here, but USA Carry has been along through the wild ride of concealed carry topics that have come up. We’re first in providing updated reciprocity information, and we’ve recently expanded into daily featured articles and content. Fostering positive discussion about CCW issues, USA Carry certainly is front and center. And recently, we’ve added audio podcasts so viewers can listen to an article instead of just read it -- handy for those who are on the go and want to stay informed! You can follow us at our website USA Carry, Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest, Tumblr and Instagram. You can also subscribe to the USA Carry Podcast here.<br /> BONUS: Iraqveteran8888 -- Punisher Of Hardware<br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ub4OswUhLwo</p> <p>Iraqveteran8888, aka Eric from Moss’ Pawn & Gun, is a veteran of - you guessed it - Operation Iraqi Freedom. Since returning stateside, however, he’s taken up residence as a good authority for what a firearm can withstand before breaking. He also viciously tests quite a few firearm systems to see if they live up to expectations. In terms of concealed carrying, he’s an open advocate of it and actively tries to demonstrate pistols that function well in that environment. http://www.usacarry.com/5-concealed-carry-blogs-channels-follow/feed/ 3 We always hope you enjoy coming to USA Carry to learn and discuss more about concealed carrying. However, there’s a lot of other opinions and ideas floating out there and we wanted to show you some that sure entertained us. Mr. Colion Noir — Smart,
We always hope you enjoy coming to USA Carry to learn and discuss more about concealed carrying. However, there’s a lot of other opinions and ideas floating out there and we wanted to show you some that sure entertained us.
Mr. Colion Noir — Smart, Sensible Take On Gun Matters

Mr. Colion Noir quickly grew in popularity in the concealed carry community because he addressed the pressing issues facing us. Namely, how we can do more to prevent mass shootings, decypher the politics surrounding guns, and encourage people to act responsibly. He is also an NRA News Commentator and the host of NOIR. You can follow him on Youtube, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and his own website, Mr. Colion Noir (coming soon).
Yankee Marshal — Quick-Witted Southern Take On Guns

Not everyone agrees with the Yankee Marshal. He’s opinionated, has prior law enforcement experience, and lives in Oregon — far from his Southern roots. While his politics tend to lean conservative, he has some surprisingly open-minded takes on the politics as it relates to the shooter and his responsibilities. Not every video you’ll agree with, but you’ll definitely see he takes safety seriously and the rest is up for laughs and good-hearted debate. You can follow the Yankee Marshal on Youtube, Facebook and Instagram.
Concealed Nation — Advocating For Responsible CCW
Concealed Nation has always stuck to their guns – no pun intended – in maintaining that concealed carriers have a responsibility to be knowledgeable about the law, train how they intend to fight, and maintaining constant situational awareness. One of the unique things about Concealed Nation is they’re extremely good at covering actual concealed carry events in the news and reporting them for their audience. This helps keep people aware that proper training and a good mindset will go a long way in staying safe. We like them so much, sometimes we share their articles. You can follow them at their website Concealed Nation, http://www.usacarry.com/?p=9150 http://www.usacarry.com/should-concealed-carry-college-be-allowed/#comments Luke McCoy <p>After events like What Tragedies Like The Delta State University Shooting Teach Us, it ought be argued that concealed carry by staff and students is a smart idea for college. While the detractors argue to the high heavens about whether or not some disgruntled student will do this or that -- we’re seeing that in “gun free zones”, the criminals get to make the rules.</p> <p>All it takes is for one armed gunman to make his way onto a “gun free campus” and it’s pretty much a waiting game until law enforcement can arrive. When seconds can last minutes and the recent Delta State University search lasted into half a day -- the odds are against anyone on campus who’s lawfully unarmed when dealing with a serious, dedicated foe.</p> <p>As we’ve seen in countless other shooting incidents, when a zone is arbitrarily designated “gun free”, all it means is that anyone caught in that area has to wait for police and first responders to arrive on the scene.</p> <p>Once on the scene, first responders and police have to quickly sift through “friend or foe”. In a hectic situation, it’s extremely difficult to confirm origin of the shooting, who’s injured, who’s dead, and who’s at-risk. Having concealed carriers on the ground when law enforcement arrives means at least you have other eyes which have been on the situation since it developed. Even if it’s simply securing classrooms and shelters, it enables other students to know that their safety is a priority.</p> <p>See Also: Your College Kid’s Guide to Personal Protection</p> <p>Another tragic part about the Delta State University fiasco was that while Mississippi is one of the few states which does not legally prohibit concealed carry on university and college campuses, administrators are still granted the privilege of restricting large swaths of the campus from concealed carriers. And as any college student or university employee would know -- the time to transition between parts of the campus between classes is slim. For a concealed carrier interested in keeping his firearm holstered throughout the day would be unnecessarily dissuaded from doing so by the threat of crossing across a “gun free zone”.</p> <p>Few, if any witnesses reported the actual gunman and law enforcement spent hours determining whether or not he was even still on campus. This means that security was/is so lax that it’s virtually guaranteed if someone goes somewhere with harm in mind and a cool head, he or she would have no problem walking right into an office and doing so.</p> <p>The same answer is clear as in any shooting that occurs on a university or college campus -- better armed, better trained, and better prepared people are needed. And in order to do that, we can either spend billions hiring on large armies of police to swarm at the first sign of harm or we can enable our own citizens to be prepared and able to defend themselves.</p> <p>Read the original story: <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.usacarry.com/should-concealed-carry-college-be-allowed/">Should Concealed Carry in College by Staff and Students be Allowed?</a></p> http://www.usacarry.com/should-concealed-carry-college-be-allowed/feed/ 60 After events like What Tragedies Like The Delta State University Shooting Teach Us, it ought be argued that concealed carry by staff and students is a smart idea for college. While the detractors argue to the high heavens about whether or not some disg... After events like What Tragedies Like The Delta State University Shooting Teach Us, it ought be argued that concealed carry by staff and students is a smart idea for college. While the detractors argue to the high heavens about whether or not some disgruntled student will do this or that — we’re seeing that in “gun free zones”, the criminals get to make the rules.
All it takes is for one armed gunman to make his way onto a “gun free campus” and it’s pretty much a waiting game until law enforcement can arrive. When seconds can last minutes and the recent Delta State University search lasted into half a day — the odds are against anyone on campus who’s lawfully unarmed when dealing with a serious, dedicated foe.
As we’ve seen in countless other shooting incidents, when a zone is arbitrarily designated “gun free”, all it means is that anyone caught in that area has to wait for police and first responders to arrive on the scene.
Once on the scene, first responders and police have to quickly sift through “friend or foe”. In a hectic situation, it’s extremely difficult to confirm origin of the shooting, who’s injured, who’s dead, and who’s at-risk. Having concealed carriers on the ground when law enforcement arrives means at least you have other eyes which have been on the situation since it developed. Even if it’s simply securing classrooms and shelters, it enables other students to know that their safety is a priority.
See Also: Your College Kid’s Guide to Personal Protection
Another tragic part about the Delta State University fiasco was that while Mississippi is one of the few states which does not legally prohibit concealed carry on university and college campuses, administrators are still granted the privilege of restricting large swaths of the campus from concealed carriers. And as any college student or university employee would know — the time to transition between parts of the campus between classes is slim. For a concealed carrier interested in keeping his firearm holstered throughout the day would be unnecessarily dissuaded from doing so by the threat of crossing across a “gun free zone”.
Few, if any witnesses reported the actual gunman and law enforcement spent hours determining whether or not he was even still on campus. This means that security was/is so lax that it’s virtually guaranteed if someone goes somewhere with harm in mind and a cool head, he or she would have no problem walking right into an office and doing so.
The same answer is clear as in any shooting that occurs on a university or college campus — better armed, better trained, and better prepared people are needed. And in order to do that, we can either spend billions hiring on large armies of police to swarm at the first sign of harm or we can enable our own citizens to be prepared and able to defend themselves.
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USA Carry Podcast clean 3:13
What Tragedies Like The Delta State University Shooting Teach Us - USA Carry Podcast http://www.usacarry.com/delta-state-university-shooting-teach-us/ Tue, 15 Sep 2015 14:39:25 +0000 http://www.usacarry.com/?p=9144 http://www.usacarry.com/delta-state-university-shooting-teach-us/#comments Luke McCoy <p>Details are still emerging about the shooting that occurred on the campus of Delta State University.  At 4:00 PM EST on September 14, the Bolivar County Deputy Coroner Murray Roark has confirmed that professor Ethan Schmidt, an assistant professor of history at Delta State, was shot dead at approximately 10:45 am.</p> <p>This shooting came nearly twenty five minutes after Dr. Shannon Lamb, 45, a professor of Geology also at DSU, called in to authorities to report the death of a woman 5 hours away in Gautier, MS.</p> <p>After the initial shooting incident was reported, students and faculty were issued the order to shelter-in-place until law enforcement could clear and evacuate the buildings.  WMC Action News 5 reported that law enforcement believed the shooter to no longer be on campus following the murder of Prof. Schmidt.</p> <p>It is being reported that last night while being chased by police, the suspect Dr. Shannon Lamb, jumped out of his car, ran into the woods and committed suicide.</p> <p>It was a heavy day - to say the least.  Even before all the details emerge, though, there are a couple things that have become evident.</p> <p>Gun Free Zones don’t work.  At the time of this article, the State of Mississippi allows public university administrators to designate areas as “gun free”.  These designators are arbitrary to the law-abiding carrier.  For the criminal, however, it’s a guarantee he’ll find no resistance.</p> <p>“Better Access To Mental Health” isn’t a panacea.  Just saying “we need better mental health services” does not alleviate the immediate need for others to stay safe.  It’s a common phrase thrown out there but, for a moment, we need to consider what we currently do to actually live that concept versus simply saying it.</p> <p>In order to facilitate people gaining access to mental health when they have dangerous thoughts or intentions is not to simply say “go see a psychiatrist.”  People in an altered state of mind due to trauma, tragedy, depression, or a number of other mental contingencies are not going to want to risk their livelihoods, careers, relationships, or status quo or life to seek treatment which will serve as a permanent black record.  Whenever a mental health professional is alerted to a client or patient exhibiting intentions of harm to self or others, that mental health professional is obligated to inform law enforcement.  That means the person isn’t allowed any degree of anonymity in his or her condition and is now consigned to live with that mark -- viewed as an active or potential threat.  Is that an effective treatment option?</p> <p>Banning guns and tightening restrictions will not make this go away.  Universal background checks, more in-depth psychological analysis on potential gun buyers, waiting periods -- these things don’t catch many of the perpetrators that go on to commit these crimes.  Why?  Because they have no history of crime.</p> <p>The easiest answer, indeed, is allowing more access to firearms in sensitive areas where “gun free zones” are apt to crop up.  Because there is little warning when events like this occur -- it’s all the more important that sane, competent, law-abiding people are granted their constitutional ability to protect themselves.</p> <p>We here at USA Carry offer our hearts and prayers to the family of Professor Schmidt and are entirely thankful for the fast reaction and coordination of Mississippi law enforcement.  If anything, we wish to see these events handled with the same professionalism going forward into the future.</p> <p>Read the original story: <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.usacarry.com/delta-state-university-shooting-teach-us/">What Tragedies Like The Delta State University Shooting Teach Us</a></p> http://www.usacarry.com/delta-state-university-shooting-teach-us/feed/ 9 Details are still emerging about the shooting that occurred on the campus of Delta State University.  At 4:00 PM EST on September 14, the Bolivar County Deputy Coroner Murray Roark has confirmed that professor Ethan Schmidt,
Details are still emerging about the shooting that occurred on the campus of Delta State University.  At 4:00 PM EST on September 14, the Bolivar County Deputy Coroner Murray Roark has confirmed that professor Ethan Schmidt, an assistant professor of history at Delta State, was shot dead at approximately 10:45 am.
This shooting came nearly twenty five minutes after Dr. Shannon Lamb, 45, a professor of Geology also at DSU, called in to authorities to report the death of a woman 5 hours away in Gautier, MS.
After the initial shooting incident was reported, students and faculty were issued the order to shelter-in-place until law enforcement could clear and evacuate the buildings.  WMC Action News 5 reported that law enforcement believed the shooter to no longer be on campus following the murder of Prof. Schmidt.
It is being reported that last night while being chased by police, the suspect Dr. Shannon Lamb, jumped out of his car, ran into the woods and committed suicide.
It was a heavy day – to say the least.  Even before all the details emerge, though, there are a couple things that have become evident.
Gun Free Zones don’t work.  At the time of this article, the State of Mississippi allows public university administrators to designate areas as “gun free”.  These designators are arbitrary to the law-abiding carrier.  For the criminal, however, it’s a guarantee he’ll find no resistance.
“Better Access To Mental Health” isn’t a panacea.  Just saying “we need better mental health services” does not alleviate the immediate need for others to stay safe.  It’s a common phrase thrown out there but, for a moment, we need to consider what we currently do to actually live that concept versus simply saying it.
In order to facilitate people gaining access to mental health when they have dangerous thoughts or intentions is not to simply say “go see a psychiatrist.”  People in an altered state of mind due to trauma, tragedy, depression, or a number of other mental contingencies are not going to want to risk their livelihoods, careers, relationships, or status quo or life to seek treatment which will serve as a permanent black record.  Whenever a mental health professional is alerted to a client or patient exhibiting intentions of harm to self or others, that mental health professional is obligated to inform law enforcement.  That means the person isn’t allowed any degree of anonymity in his or her condition and is now consigned to live with that mark — viewed as an active or potential threat.  Is that an effective treatment option?
Banning guns and tightening restrictions will not make this go away.  Universal background checks, more in-depth psychological analysis on potential gun buyers, waiting periods — these things don’t catch many of the perpetrators that go on to commit these crimes.  Why?  Because they have no history of crime.
The easiest answer, indeed, is allowing more access to firearms in sensitive areas where “gun free zones” are apt to crop up.  Because there is little warning when events like this occur — it’s all the more important that sane, competent, law-abiding people are granted their constitutional ability to protect themselves.
We here at USA Carry offer our hearts and prayers to the family of Professor Schmidt and are entirely thankful for the fast reaction and coordination of Mississippi law enforcement.  If anything, we wish to see these events handled with the same professionalism going forward into the future.
]]>
USA Carry Podcast clean 3:46
Basic Firearms Quiz #2 - USA Carry Podcast http://www.usacarry.com/basic-firearms-quiz-2/ Fri, 11 Sep 2015 18:56:03 +0000 http://www.usacarry.com/?p=9137 http://www.usacarry.com/basic-firearms-quiz-2/#comments Ben Findley <p>Here is another brief, just-for-fun Quiz, like the one I presented in July 2015, Basic Firearms Quiz. I received several personal comments and emails, mostly positive, and a large majority did very well. It was meant to be a light, fun experience for folks. I guess you cannot design a Quiz that challenges everyone the same and is an "average" knowledge test. So, just enjoy the journey and have fun! This Quiz to have some fun and improve your firearms knowledge base.</p> <p>Generally, if you get 18 or more questions correct (90%+), you are at the Advanced level. If you get 16 or 17 (80-85%) questions correct, you are at the Intermediate level, and 14 to 15 (70-75%) correct questions means Basic understanding. Anything below 14 correct questions, means more study, practice, classes, and fun researching firearms issues, facts, and information. Take as much time as you need for this Quiz. Please share your Quiz results as either Advanced, Intermediate, or Basic in the Comments section below. SUCCESS!</p> <p>Read the original story: <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.usacarry.com/basic-firearms-quiz-2/">Basic Firearms Quiz #2</a></p> http://www.usacarry.com/basic-firearms-quiz-2/feed/ 15 Here is another brief, just-for-fun Quiz, like the one I presented in July 2015, Basic Firearms Quiz. I received several personal comments and emails, mostly positive, and a large majority did very well. It was meant to be a light, Here is another brief, just-for-fun Quiz, like the one I presented in July 2015, Basic Firearms Quiz. I received several personal comments and emails, mostly positive, and a large majority did very well. It was meant to be a light, fun experience for folks. I guess you cannot design a Quiz that challenges everyone the same and is an “average” knowledge test. So, just enjoy the journey and have fun! This Quiz to have some fun and improve your firearms knowledge base.
Generally, if you get 18 or more questions correct (90%+), you are at the Advanced level. If you get 16 or 17 (80-85%) questions correct, you are at the Intermediate level, and 14 to 15 (70-75%) correct questions means Basic understanding. Anything below 14 correct questions, means more study, practice, classes, and fun researching firearms issues, facts, and information. Take as much time as you need for this Quiz. Please share your Quiz results as either Advanced, Intermediate, or Basic in the Comments section below. SUCCESS!



Basic Firearms Quiz #2



Step 1 of 21


4%


Which handgun manufacturer was the first to develop a polymer-framed handgun?*BerettaGlockH&KColtSmith & Wesson







What describes efficiently mixing the air and the unburnt powder at the end of the muzzle with this in such a way that there is no blast flare?*Flash HiderMuzzle Glow ReducerSuppressorCompensatorBirdcage Effect







Which pistol with an exposed hammer officially replaced the 9mm Luger during World War II?*Colt .45Browning HPWalther P38Enfield MKIBeretta 92F







What device is used to vent some of the gasses and attempts to counter the vertical movement of the barrel when the gun is fired?*Flash HiderMuzzle BreakSilencerSuppressorCompensator







Which of the following is usually true?*You should lean slightly backwards when shooting your pistol.You ability to maintain accurate shot placement is more important than the caliber you use.It is best to shoot a handgun with your non-dominant eye closed.There is no need to hold your breath when shooting.You should fire a warning shot in an encounter with an intruder.







This is greatly influenced by the projectile's speed, decreases during flight, and, generally, the higher it is, the more damage it will do.*FragmentationBullet PenetrationBullet ExpansionKinetic EnergyTemporary Cavity




]]>
USA Carry Podcast clean 12:37
7 Cheap CCW Pistols – Deal Or Dud? - USA Carry Podcast http://www.usacarry.com/7-cheap-ccw-pistols/ Thu, 10 Sep 2015 17:30:09 +0000 http://www.usacarry.com/?p=9095 http://www.usacarry.com/7-cheap-ccw-pistols/#comments Luke McCoy <p>S&W M&P Shield - 9mm/.40 S&W</p> <p>The M&P Shield 9mm is currently under investigation pending a potential fault in their safety switch for their previous generations.  That problem has been solved with more recent models but the lingering doubt remains over whether this is truly a reliable model.  In 9mm, the Shield has a standard capacity of 7 rounds - with extended mags capable of carrying 8.  The .40 S&W version carries 6.  It’s a direct competitor with Glock in terms of sales and widespread use.  With a base MSRP of $450, it’s a reasonably good deal.  Buying one used, however, can bring the price downwards of $350.</p> <p>Kahr CM9 - 9mm</p> <p>The Kahr CM9 is the lower end version of its better made PM9 cousins.  Made to the same exacting quality in terms of mechanics, it lacks the luster and shine of its pricier counterparts.  As a concealed carry pistol, though, who cares?  The only time you’ll see it is at the range or in a self-defense situation -- and in both cases it performs admirably well.  Chambered in 9mm, it holds 6 rounds and features Double Action Only (DAO) operation.  The MSRP for these is $460 but it can easily be obtained used for less than $400.<br /> Taurus PT-111 G2 - 9mm</p> <p>The cheaper competitor to the S&W M&P Shield and Walther PPS, the Taurus PT-111 G2 promises the world - but can it deliver?  Recently, Taurus had a massive recall on their pistols from a previous generation.  For concealed carriers, the two biggest fears are negligent discharges and failures to fire - two traits found in the prior generation.  As for the present generation, Taurus has a lot of proving to do before they get anybody’s stamp of approval.  Still, with an attractive MSRP of $300 - it’s definitely in the running with other pistols of its size and caliber.<br /> Bersa Thunder .380</p> <p>The Bersa Thunder is a cheap, reliable concealed carry pistol at a pricepoint that almost anyone can afford.  With a retail MSRP of $350 for the base Bersa Thunder model, it still offers great accuracy and precision in a small package.  Standard, it holds 7 rounds of .380 with Single Action/Double Action trigger performance.<br /> Hi-Point 916 - 9mm</p> <p>Hi-Point is ubiquitous for being the cheapest pistol on the block.  Even with the pricepoint, the pistol comes with a manufacturer’s guarantee for the lifetime of the pistol.  This is exemplified in the Hi-Point 916.  It comes with a standard 8-round magazine capacity and a high-impact polymer frame for less than $200.<br /> Kel-Tec P-3AT - .380</p> <p>The Kel-Tec P-3AT is the original concealed carry frame for Kel-Tec’s other concealed carry pistol models such as the P-32, P-11, and PF-9.  With a standard capacity of 6 rounds and a base MSRP of $338, it certainly is a strong competitor for fiscally conservative concealed carriers.  It works off DAO operation, so the safety is a bit more robust than that found in striker-fire pistols.  Overall, it’s a great value for performance.<br /> Ruger LCP - .380</p> <p>For less than $300, you would be hard pressed to find a better budget-friendly, high-performance concealed carry pistol than the Ruger LCP.  Much like the Bersa Thunder and Kel-Tec, it only holds 6 rounds, is chambered in .380 and retails for less than $300 new.  More importantly, it has a long history of good performance and reliable customer reviews.</p> <p>Read the original story: <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.usacarry.com/7-cheap-ccw-pistols/">7 Cheap CCW Pistols – Deal Or Dud?</a></p> http://www.usacarry.com/7-cheap-ccw-pistols/feed/ 34 S&W M&P Shield – 9mm/.40 S&W The M&P Shield 9mm is currently under investigation pending a potential fault in their safety switch for their previous generations.  That problem has been solved with more recent models but the lingering doubt remains over...
The M&P Shield 9mm is currently under investigation pending a potential fault in their safety switch for their previous generations.  That problem has been solved with more recent models but the lingering doubt remains over whether this is truly a reliable model.  In 9mm, the Shield has a standard capacity of 7 rounds – with extended mags capable of carrying 8.  The .40 S&W version carries 6.  It’s a direct competitor with Glock in terms of sales and widespread use.  With a base MSRP of $450, it’s a reasonably good deal.  Buying one used, however, can bring the price downwards of $350.
Kahr CM9 – 9mm

The Kahr CM9 is the lower end version of its better made PM9 cousins.  Made to the same exacting quality in terms of mechanics, it lacks the luster and shine of its pricier counterparts.  As a concealed carry pistol, though, who cares?  The only time you’ll see it is at the range or in a self-defense situation — and in both cases it performs admirably well.  Chambered in 9mm, it holds 6 rounds and features Double Action Only (DAO) operation.  The MSRP for these is $460 but it can easily be obtained used for less than $400.
Taurus PT-111 G2 – 9mm

The cheaper competitor to the S&W M&P Shield and Walther PPS, the Taurus PT-111 G2 promises the world – but can it deliver?  Recently, Taurus had a massive recall on their pistols from a previous generation.  For concealed carriers, the two biggest fears are negligent discharges and failures to fire – two traits found in the prior generation.  As for the present generation, Taurus has a lot of proving to do before they get anybody’s stamp of approval.  Still, with an attractive MSRP of $300 – it’s definitely in the running with other pistols of its size and caliber.
Bersa Thunder .380

The Bersa Thunder is a cheap, reliable concealed carry pistol at a pricepoint that almost anyone can afford.  With a retail MSRP of $350 for the base Bersa Thunder model, it still offers great accuracy and precision in a small package.  Standard, it holds 7 rounds of .380 with Single Action/Double Action trigger performance.
Hi-Point 916 – 9mm

Hi-Point is ubiquitous for being the cheapest pistol on the block.  Even with the pricepoint, the pistol comes with a manufacturer’s guarantee for the lifetime of the pistol.  This is exemplified in the Hi-Point 916.  It comes with a standard 8-round magazine capacity and a high-impact polymer frame for less than $200.
Kel-Tec P-3AT – .380

The Kel-Tec P-3AT is the original concealed carry frame for Kel-Tec’s other concealed carry pistol models such as the P-32, P-11, and PF-9.  With a standard capacity of 6 rounds and a base MSRP of $338, it certainly is a strong competitor for fiscally conservative concealed carriers.  It works off DAO operation, so the safety is a bit more robust than that found in striker-fire pistols.  Overall, it’s a great value for performance.
Ruger LCP – .380

For less than $300, you would be hard pressed to find a better budget-friendly, high-performance concealed carry pistol than the http://www.usacarry.com/?p=9089 http://www.usacarry.com/changing-face-gun-ownership-usa/#comments Michael Jenkins <p>I would imagine by now that we're all familiar with the popular stereotypes of gun owners: fat white guys in Confederate flag t-shirts, if not tin foil hats. And heck—it's a funny image, and I'm not above laughing at it.</p> <p>And like so much we see in media, it's not entirely true.</p> <p>The demographics of gun ownership in these United States are changing—and fast. While men are still predominant in the world of gun ownership, the fastest growing demographic is . . . women. Yep. The fairer sex are rapidly discovering the joys of the shooting sports and the importance of self-protection.</p> <p>The numbers are impressive: in 2000, 500 women participated in the NRA's women-only training program. In 2014, nearly 1500 did. The overall number of female firearm owners increased a whopping 77% between 2001 and 2011. The trend is so strong that feminist new outlets like Jezebel have explored it in (digital) print. From them, we learn that the Facebook group Sheepdog Mamas is a gathering place for mothers who carry—over 6,000 strong and growing every day. Combined with the surge in women seeking hunting licenses, we may face a future in which shooting sports are, in general, a woman's thing.</p> <p>And that's absolutely fantastic.</p> <p>Things are shifting racially as well. African-Americans in particular are re-discovering the traditions of their fore-bearers and the joys of shooting. A solid majority of black Americans support firearms ownership, up significantly from a decade ago. African-Americans are seeking concealed carry permits in droves, and fully embracing their rights to bear arms and defend themselves.</p> <p>So, what does this mean for the shooting community as a whole?</p> <p>Well, it's fantastic. Absolutely fantastic. A growing interest in shooting and CCW is a great way to further support of our Second Amendment rights. Broader based demographic support does nothing but help us politically. And it's fantastic to see stereotypes being demolished in our time; if the Second Amendment is about freedom, all people need to be free to be themselves within the broader community of shooters. Which means—and you had to see this coming—that it is incumbent upon us, as Second Amendment enthusiasts, to embrace this change.</p> <p>So open your minds and your hearts. Make our African-American friends and neighbors welcome. Invite neighbors and friends shooting with you. Make a platonic female friend at the range. Say hello to that nice gay couple when you're shooting skeet next weekend. Let's build a shooting community that looks more like America as a whole, so that our grandchildren can enjoy the same freedoms we do.</p> <p>As always, just one man's opinion, and I welcome discussion from the assembled. So shoot straight and stay safe out there.</p> <p>Read the original story: <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.usacarry.com/changing-face-gun-ownership-usa/">The Changing Face of Gun Ownership in the USA</a></p> http://www.usacarry.com/changing-face-gun-ownership-usa/feed/ 4 I would imagine by now that we’re all familiar with the popular stereotypes of gun owners: fat white guys in Confederate flag t-shirts, if not tin foil hats. And heck—it’s a funny image, and I’m not above laughing at it. I would imagine by now that we’re all familiar with the popular stereotypes of gun owners: fat white guys in Confederate flag t-shirts, if not tin foil hats. And heck—it’s a funny image, and I’m not above laughing at it.
And like so much we see in media, it’s not entirely true.
The demographics of gun ownership in these United States are changing—and fast. While men are still predominant in the world of gun ownership, the fastest growing demographic is . . . women. Yep. The fairer sex are rapidly discovering the joys of the shooting sports and the importance of self-protection.
The numbers are impressive: in 2000, 500 women participated in the NRA’s women-only training program. In 2014, nearly 1500 did. The overall number of female firearm owners increased a whopping 77% between 2001 and 2011. The trend is so strong that feminist new outlets like Jezebel have explored it in (digital) print. From them, we learn that the Facebook group Sheepdog Mamas is a gathering place for mothers who carry—over 6,000 strong and growing every day. Combined with the surge in women seeking hunting licenses, we may face a future in which shooting sports are, in general, a woman’s thing.
And that’s absolutely fantastic.
Things are shifting racially as well. African-Americans in particular are re-discovering the traditions of their fore-bearers and the joys of shooting. A solid majority of black Americans support firearms ownership, up significantly from a decade ago. African-Americans are seeking concealed carry permits in droves, and fully embracing their rights to bear arms and defend themselves.
So, what does this mean for the shooting community as a whole?
Well, it’s fantastic. Absolutely fantastic. A growing interest in shooting and CCW is a great way to further support of our Second Amendment rights. Broader based demographic support does nothing but help us politically. And it’s fantastic to see stereotypes being demolished in our time; if the Second Amendment is about freedom, all people need to be free to be themselves within the broader community of shooters. Which means—and you had to see this coming—that it is incumbent upon us, as Second Amendment enthusiasts, to embrace this change.
So open your minds and your hearts. Make our African-American friends and neighbors welcome. Invite neighbors and friends shooting with you. Make a platonic female friend at the range. Say hello to that nice gay couple when you’re shooting skeet next weekend. Let’s build a shooting community that looks more like America as a whole, so that our grandchildren can enjoy the same freedoms we do.
As always, just one man’s opinion, and I welcome discussion from the assembled. So shoot straight and stay safe out there.
]]>
USA Carry Podcast clean 3:19
No Such Thing As An Ideal Opponent — A Tragic Tale Of Two Teens - USA Carry Podcast http://www.usacarry.com/ideal-opponent-news/ Sat, 05 Sep 2015 14:42:05 +0000 http://www.usacarry.com/?p=9081 http://www.usacarry.com/ideal-opponent-news/#comments Luke McCoy <p>In just this past week, we’ve seen two separate incidents of armed teenagers attempting to rob concealed carriers -- only for it to end tragically.  The first incident occurred in Norfolk, Virginia, where a teenager attempted to rob a pizza delivery driver at gunpoint.  The driver pulled his firearm and shot the teenager.  In another case in Detroit, a teenager tried to rob a man of his sunglasses while he was parked in his vehicle.  That man was a concealed carrier and likewise shot the teen.</p> <p>Both teens used firearms in the commission of a crime.  In both cases, they went after someone they thought they had a reasonable chance of overtaking through force.  In both incidents, they were wrong.  Thankfully, both teenagers will live -- albeit them being charged as adults vice juveniles has yet to be determined.</p> <p>We’re seeing kids making the big adult step into using guns as instruments of power.  And because many of those kids don’t understand how those firearms work -- they wind up in the line of fire themselves.</p> <p>As concealed carriers, our only job is to protect ourselves, our family, and our property from deadly attack.  But time and time again, we’re seeing these concealed carriers pitted up against not your usual suspects.  Plenty of people can develop a mental preparedness necessary to put rounds on a paper target - but what about an adolescent?</p> <p>In the Detroit incident, the concealed carrier discussed it pretty matter of factly.</p> <p>via WXYZ - Detroit<br /> Joe Lanier says, "The boy tried to rob me, and I shot him. That's what happened."<br /> // </p> <p>The Norfolk case was even a bit less descript - with the pizza deliver driver having no comment on the issue altogether.</p> <p>Even as the gun control debate rages on in the background, we’re dealing with an even bigger problem: no regard for human life.</p> <p>It’s hard to grab specific statistics stating definitively with an increased amount of violence used by teenagers and adolescents in the committing felonious robberies, assaults, and burglaries -- but we’re sure seeing a notable spike in attention given to these subjects.</p> <p>For those who refuse to become participants in the concealed carry debate - citing they’d prefer to ignore the problem or wait for police - we’re seeing that their attackers have absolutely no such reservations.<br /> Stop Sympathizing With Your Attackers<br /> It’s a real danger in both the concealed carry community and those who even staunchly oppose firearms altogether.  We try to collectively psychoanalyze the people who attack others.  It’s not all high profile mass murder or public shootings - most crime occurs right in vicinity of the home or workplace.  </p> <p>“Oh, well, if they rob me - they’ll just take my stuff and leave me alone.” -- Wrong.  Don’t assume that what you would do is what your attackers will do.  A Chinese delivery man was ganged up on and beaten by four teenagers for just the food and cash he had on him.</p> <p>A Virginia Commonwealth University undergraduate student was robbed at gunpoint just for his sandwich.  </p> <p>via CBS 6<br /> "Holding somebody at gun point for a sandwich,” said Christina Moore, who lives in an apartment nearby.  “It's so reckless."<br /> Yes.  Yes, it is.  These kids don’t care and they aren’t worried about the consequences of their actions.  Add firearms - fake or unloaded or loaded or otherwise - and it’s time to face the harsh reality that there are people other there who also have firearms and aren’t afraid to use them judiciously in protecting themselves.</p> <p>So as we see two teenagers go to the hospital in just the past week after botched attempted armed robberies, we know that this isn’t an issue of gun control -- it’s an issue of basic human dignity and the complete lack of respect these criminals have for human life.</p> <p>Read the original story: <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.usacarry.com/ideal-opponent-news/">No Such Thing As An Idea... http://www.usacarry.com/ideal-opponent-news/feed/ 3 In just this past week, we’ve seen two separate incidents of armed teenagers attempting to rob concealed carriers — only for it to end tragically.  The first incident occurred in Norfolk, Virginia, where a teenager attempted to rob a pizza delivery dri... In just this past week, we’ve seen two separate incidents of armed teenagers attempting to rob concealed carriers — only for it to end tragically.  The first incident occurred in Norfolk, Virginia, where a teenager attempted to rob a pizza delivery driver at gunpoint.  The driver pulled his firearm and shot the teenager.  In another case in Detroit, a teenager tried to rob a man of his sunglasses while he was parked in his vehicle.  That man was a concealed carrier and likewise shot the teen.
Both teens used firearms in the commission of a crime.  In both cases, they went after someone they thought they had a reasonable chance of overtaking through force.  In both incidents, they were wrong.  Thankfully, both teenagers will live — albeit them being charged as adults vice juveniles has yet to be determined.
We’re seeing kids making the big adult step into using guns as instruments of power.  And because many of those kids don’t understand how those firearms work — they wind up in the line of fire themselves.
As concealed carriers, our only job is to protect ourselves, our family, and our property from deadly attack.  But time and time again, we’re seeing these concealed carriers pitted up against not your usual suspects.  Plenty of people can develop a mental preparedness necessary to put rounds on a paper target – but what about an adolescent?
In the Detroit incident, the concealed carrier discussed it pretty matter of factly.
via WXYZ – Detroit
Joe Lanier says, “The boy tried to rob me, and I shot him. That’s what happened.”
//
The Norfolk case was even a bit less descript – with the pizza deliver driver having no comment on the issue altogether.
Even as the gun control debate rages on in the background, we’re dealing with an even bigger problem: no regard for human life.
It’s hard to grab specific statistics stating definitively with an increased amount of violence used by teenagers and adolescents in the committing felonious robberies, assaults, and burglaries — but we’re sure seeing a notable spike in attention given to these subjects.
For those who refuse to become participants in the concealed carry debate – citing they’d prefer to ignore the problem or wait for police – we’re seeing that their attackers have absolutely no such reservations.
Stop Sympathizing With Your Attackers
It’s a real danger in both the concealed carry community and those who even staunchly oppose firearms altogether.  We try to collectively psychoanalyze the people who attack others.  It’s not all high profile mass murder or public shootings – most crime occurs right in vicinity of the home or workplace.  
“Oh, well, if they rob me – they’ll just take my stuff and leave me alone.” — Wrong.  Don’t assume that what you would do is what your attackers will do.  A Chinese delivery man was ganged up on and beaten by four teenagers for just the food and cash he had on him.
A Virginia Commonwealth University undergraduate student was robbed at gunpoint just for his sandwich.  
via http://www.usacarry.com/?p=9058 http://www.usacarry.com/situations-concealed-carry-choices-are-you-ready/#comments Luke McCoy <p>Read the original story: <a rel="nofollow" href="http://www.usacarry.com/situations-concealed-carry-choices-are-you-ready/">3 Situations, 3 Concealed Carry Choices — Are You Ready?</a></p> http://www.usacarry.com/situations-concealed-carry-choices-are-you-ready/feed/ 6
In this article, we’re going to give you three actual situations that have occurred.  We’ll give you the outcome of those events on the last page so you can see how the person actually responded.  Your job, as a concealed carrier, is to answer for yourself what you would have done and then compare it to the actual conclusion.
SITUATION 1:  Reckless Driver Almost Slams Into You In Pursuit Of Another Vehicle
We’ve all seen it.  Driving through busy city streets, there’s inevitably the drug deal gone wrong.  You’re focusing on the road but you notice two groups of people rush out of a house.  The first group hops in a silver Chevy Malibu and almost slams into the car in front of you trying to get away.  A second car pulls out behind you.  You watch the first car slide onto a side street and gun it.  Despite the heavy tint, you see the occupants of the car behind you have weapons out.  On a two-lane road, they go into the flow of traffic to skirt around you.  Slamming on their breaks to go down the street the gray car went, you almost run into them.  They come to a complete stop.
Click next for situation 2.



SITUATION 2:  It’s 12 PM And Two Construction Workers Are On Your Doorstep
You’re home.  It’s broad daylight hours and you get a knock at the door.  When you look through the peep hole or the window, you see two construction workers with the full regalia standing on your doorstep.  Their truck isn’t clearly visible and one of them has a name tag.  That one pipes up and says, “we’re here to check on a suspected gas leak.”  Sounds serious, right?
Click next for situation 3.



SITUATION 3:  You’re Closing Up Shop For The Night When A Van Rams Your Store’s Front Gate
You’re closing up shop for the night.  It’s been a long day, you’re tired, and it’s pretty dark outside.  As you’re closing up the register, you see a van approach the steel-reinforced entryway of the building.  Already puzzled, you watch in horror as the van backs up and accelerates into the doorway.  A few men get out and they see you.  You see that they’re armed.  The van keeps hitting the doorway and it looks like they’re not at all dissuaded by the fact you’re still inside.  Despite the reinforced doorway, the van has managed to breach the gate.  The first armed robber is getting ready to come in.
Click next for the conclusions.


Conclusions?
SITUATION 1 — In a bizarre case in Bucyrus, Ohio, three carnival workers were evading the scene by recklessly driving and eventually crashing into someone’s property.  One of them had a gunshot wound and the driver was under the influence of unknown substances.  Sketchy situations lead to sketchy conclusions — and this is certainly an example of that.
As a concealed carrier, it’s generally recommend you report these incidents to the police for investigation and stay out of them unless they spill over onto your property.
SITUATION 2 — It’s an unfortunate sign of the times when robbers dress up as legitimate construction workers, police officers, or any other number of occupations where we – as law-abiding citizens – would expect legitimacy.  In this case, the woman was robbed once she opened the door.
If you see construction workers,]]>
USA Carry Podcast clean 4:25
What Does Brandishing Mean? And Why You Should Never Do It… - USA Carry Podcast http://www.usacarry.com/what-does-brandishing-mean/ Wed, 02 Sep 2015 16:23:07 +0000 http://www.usacarry.com/?p=9052 http://www.usacarry.com/what-does-brandishing-mean/#comments Luke McCoy <p>There are going to be tense days.  You’ll eventually run into someone who isn’t paying attention or just very extremely violent and rude.  It doesn’t matter.  Your concealed carry pistol stays concealed and in its holster until you are one hundred percent certain you intend to use it for your own self-defense.</p> <p>Letting someone know you are armed - whether it’s resting a hand on your pistol grip or sweeping back your shirt to let the other person know you’re armed - can and will be construed as a threat.  And once it’s safely in that arena, you can be prosecuted in both civil and criminal court.</p> <p>A few years ago, noted firearms expert Ben Findley wrote a very comprehensive article on the definitions of brandishing as they apply to some of the states.  In that article, he gives a rough overview of the various definitions that exist out there as a means of educating concealed carriers to the facts about brandishing.</p> <p>Brandishing can be called a lot of different things. </p> <p> “Improper Exhibition of a Weapon”<br /> “Defensive Display”<br /> “Unlawful Display”</p> <p>But it all reduces down to one key concept: threatening.  And while in your mind, at the time, you may think along the lines of “that’s not a threat - that’s a promise”, the prosecuting attorney will tend to agree with you.</p> <p>If you’re charged with brandishing of a firearm or weapon, most states will use that as reason to revoke your concealed carry permit.</p> <p>Let’s be absolutely clear about one thing: your firearm doesn’t give you the authority to take the law into your own hands.  It affords you the right and privilege of defending your life from lethal attack.  Anything short of that will be construed as threatening someone who has not demonstrated intent to do you harm.<br /> Let’s Look At How Brandishing Affects You And Everyone Around You<br /> You’ve gotten in a verbal altercation with a stranger.  Things have got hot and he’s looking like he may assault you.  This is a precariously dangerous place to be in as a concealed carrier.  </p> <p>A.)  If you have power to stop or de-escalate, do it.  </p> <p>It doesn’t matter how foolish you look or what people say about you - you have a moral obligation to de-escalate because you’re armed with a firearm and you don’t know if the other guy is.  </p> <p>More importantly, if he doesn’t back down - in many states you are perfectly allowed to defend yourself accordingly.  That is, however, after all other options have been exhausted.  Failing to do this will leave you open to both criminal and civil prosecution.  </p> <p>While you may never see the inside of a jail cell, your concealed carry pistol will be forfeited for at least the duration of the investigation and the court proceedings.  If found guilty, you will effectively lose all rights to bear arms, serve significant jail time, and be ordered to pay costs associated with the case, the victim’s family, etc.  You will also end up spending tens of thousands of dollars on defense attorneys - if you don’t expect to simply lay down under that legal bus heading your way.</p> <p>B.)  Brandishing your firearm is not an immediate “win” to any altercation.  </p> <p>If anything, you’ve just informed the other person that you’re reckless enough to show your firearm.  Worst of all, if he is armed - you just presented yourself as a threat.  And this doesn’t extend to just him - anyone in the field of view can independently determine that your careless display constitutes a logical, lethal threat to their well-being.  And they’d be right.  If you can’t be counted on to know the law and act lawfully with your firearm then it’s reasonable to say you’re woefully ignorant of the rest of that process -- all of which could draw those surrounding you and your “foe” into that conflict.</p> <p>Before considering “defensive display” or anything of the sort, put yourself both in the shoes of the person you’re dealing with and those in the near vicinity. http://www.usacarry.com/what-does-brandishing-mean/feed/ 29 There are going to be tense days.  You’ll eventually run into someone who isn’t paying attention or just very extremely violent and rude.  It doesn’t matter.  Your concealed carry pistol stays concealed and in its holster until you are one hundred perc... There are going to be tense days.  You’ll eventually run into someone who isn’t paying attention or just very extremely violent and rude.  It doesn’t matter.  Your concealed carry pistol stays concealed and in its holster until you are one hundred percent certain you intend to use it for your own self-defense.
Letting someone know you are armed – whether it’s resting a hand on your pistol grip or sweeping back your shirt to let the other person know you’re armed – can and will be construed as a threat.  And once it’s safely in that arena, you can be prosecuted in both civil and criminal court.
A few years ago, noted firearms expert Ben Findley wrote a very comprehensive article on the definitions of brandishing as they apply to some of the states.  In that article, he gives a rough overview of the various definitions that exist out there as a means of educating concealed carriers to the facts about brandishing.
Brandishing can be called a lot of different things.

“Improper Exhibition of a Weapon”
“Defensive Display”
“Unlawful Display”

But it all reduces down to one key concept: threatening.  And while in your mind, at the time, you may think along the lines of “that’s not a threat – that’s a promise”, the prosecuting attorney will tend to agree with you.
If you’re charged with brandishing of a firearm or weapon, most states will use that as reason to revoke your concealed carry permit.
Let’s be absolutely clear about one thing: your firearm doesn’t give you the authority to take the law into your own hands.  It affords you the right and privilege of defending your life from lethal attack.  Anything short of that will be construed as threatening someone who has not demonstrated intent to do you harm.
Let’s Look At How Brandishing Affects You And Everyone Around You
You’ve gotten in a verbal altercation with a stranger.  Things have got hot and he’s looking like he may assault you.  This is a precariously dangerous place to be in as a concealed carrier.  
A.)  If you have power to stop or de-escalate, do it.  
It doesn’t matter how foolish you look or what people say about you – you have a moral obligation to de-escalate because you’re armed with a firearm and you don’t know if the other guy is.  
More importantly, if he doesn’t back down – in many states you are perfectly allowed to defend yourself accordingly.  That is, however, after all other options have been exhausted.  Failing to do this will leave you open to both criminal and civil prosecution.  
While you may never see the inside of a jail cell, your concealed carry pistol will be forfeited for at least the duration of the investigation and the court proceedings.  If found guilty, you will effectively lose all rights to bear arms, serve significant jail time, and be ordered to pay costs associated with the case, the victim’s family, etc.  You will also end up spending tens of thousands of dollars on defense attorneys – if you don’t expect to simply lay down under that legal bus heading your way.
B.)  Brandishing your firearm is not an immediate “win” to any altercation.  
If anything, you’ve just informed the other person that you’re reckless enough to show your firearm.  Worst of all, if he is armed – you just presented yourself as a threat.  And this doesn’t extend to just him – anyone in the field of view can independently determine that your careless display constitutes a logical, lethal threat to their well-being.  And they’d be right.  If you can’t be counted on to know the law and act lawfully with your firearm then it’s reasonable to say you’re woefully ignorant of the rest of that process — all of which could draw those surrounding you and your “foe” into that conflict...]]>
USA Carry Podcast clean 4:26
Are You Gripping Your CCW Pistol Correctly? - USA Carry Podcast http://www.usacarry.com/are-you-gripping-your-ccw-pistol-correctly/ Tue, 01 Sep 2015 14:37:22 +0000 http://www.usacarry.com/?p=9038 http://www.usacarry.com/are-you-gripping-your-ccw-pistol-correctly/#comments Luke McCoy <p>Shot placement and grip are not related.  As long as the trigger is pulled, the bullet doesn’t care how your hand grips your gun.  That said, for fast follow-up shots, tight shot placement, etc., grip does come into play.  </p> <p>No concealed carrier plans on taking down his target with the first round.  We always strive to make that first round on target - but no guarantees on efficacy.<br /> Pistol Grip - High Or Low?<br /> The pistol grip is generally how we control the firearm.  After a shot is fired, the upper receiver slaps backwards - generally giving us the impression of recoil.  The lower a person grips a pistol, the more that force becomes angular.  Fast follow-up shots depend on that force being as close to a straight line as possible.</p> <p>https://youtu.be/KJrA7wMXuuQ?t=1m24s</p> <p>Danger Signs That Grip Is Too High</p> <p> The webbing of your dominant hand is getting bit by the upper receiver after a round is fired.<br /> Supporting fingers along the upper receiver are getting bit by the slide</p> <p>Having a too high of a grip can definitely hurt.  The hard part for a lot of shooters is that the higher the grip, the more stable the recoil and tighter the follow-up shots.  But there’s also a real risk of having too low of a grip.</p> <p>Danger Signs That Grip Is Too Low</p> <p> You have a hard time getting back on target after the initial shot - due to recoil.<br /> Your trigger pull naturally cants the muzzle below the bullseye.</p> <p>Too high and your hand is getting bit.  Too low and the gun is not in your control.  This is why range time and dry firing are essential to finding the right grip for the gun.  Each firearm will have different requirements as concealed carry pistols typically range from barely enough space for one hand all the way to needing both to direct the firearm.</p> <p>Read Also: Common Handgun Shooting Problems, Probable Causes, and Possible Solutions<br /> Isometric Tension - Supporting The Gun From All Angles<br /> In order to reduce recoil and weapon spread, you need to apply uniform pressure along the gun.  This helps to compensate for any recoil and ensures follow up shots are placed tightly and precise with the previous.  The hard part?  Our hands aren’t perfect vice grips.  And different pistol grips (and revolver grips) require different hand configurations.   The one technique that’s unilaterally ineffective is the tea cup grip.  That’s where your dominant hand maintains a firm middle grip of the pistol and your supporting hand rests beneath the magazine well.  </p> <p>Here’s a short video that reasonably shows a good technique for Glock-style pistol grips.</p> <p>https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ylh4DyMADRU</p> <p>For revolvers (and especially compact J-frames), The Yankee Marshall has a very decent video demonstrating grip.</p> <p>https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7w7AqQcHN9A<br /> “But wait a second, USA Carry, you just said the teacup grip was a bad idea and Yankee Marshall is saying it’s a good one.”<br /> For small J-frame revolvers, you can get away with a tea cup grip.  Heck, for many shooters, J-frame revolvers are solo-hand carry firearms.  Revolvers are awesome and unfortunately have taken a back seat in the world of high speed, low drag polymer designs and fancy gadgetry.  But there’s plenty of reasons why revolvers are still on the market - and if you’ve got smaller hands and really want to make sure that first round strikes along your sight alignment - a J-frame is definitely worth checking out.</p> <p>In the end, there’s no one grip fits all approach to firearms.  Preferably, grip as high as you can without snapping your fingers or hands.  Keep your finger clear and off the trigger until you’re ready to fire.  And above all else, experiment at the range so you don’t have to experiment in real life.</p> <p>// </p> <p>Post by USA Carry.</p> <p> <br /> Tweets about http://www.usacarry.com/are-you-gripping-your-ccw-pistol-correctly/<br /> !function(d,s, http://www.usacarry.com/are-you-gripping-your-ccw-pistol-correctly/feed/ 2 Shot placement and grip are not related.  As long as the trigger is pulled, the bullet doesn’t care how your hand grips your gun.  That said, for fast follow-up shots, tight shot placement, etc., grip does come into play. Shot placement and grip are not related.  As long as the trigger is pulled, the bullet doesn’t care how your hand grips your gun.  That said, for fast follow-up shots, tight shot placement, etc., grip does come into play.  
No concealed carrier plans on taking down his target with the first round.  We always strive to make that first round on target – but no guarantees on efficacy.
Pistol Grip – High Or Low?
The pistol grip is generally how we control the firearm.  After a shot is fired, the upper receiver slaps backwards – generally giving us the impression of recoil.  The lower a person grips a pistol, the more that force becomes angular.  Fast follow-up shots depend on that force being as close to a straight line as possible.

Danger Signs That Grip Is Too High

The webbing of your dominant hand is getting bit by the upper receiver after a round is fired.
Supporting fingers along the upper receiver are getting bit by the slide

Having a too high of a grip can definitely hurt.  The hard part for a lot of shooters is that the higher the grip, the more stable the recoil and tighter the follow-up shots.  But there’s also a real risk of having too low of a grip.
Danger Signs That Grip Is Too Low

You have a hard time getting back on target after the initial shot – due to recoil.
Your trigger pull naturally cants the muzzle below the bullseye.

Too high and your hand is getting bit.  Too low and the gun is not in your control.  This is why range time and dry firing are essential to finding the right grip for the gun.  Each firearm will have different requirements as concealed carry pistols typically range from barely enough space for one hand all the way to needing both to direct the firearm.
Read Also: Common Handgun Shooting Problems, Probable Causes, and Possible Solutions
Isometric Tension – Supporting The Gun From All Angles
In order to reduce recoil and weapon spread, you need to apply uniform pressure along the gun.  This helps to compensate for any recoil and ensures follow up shots are placed tightly and precise with the previous.  The hard part?  Our hands aren’t perfect vice grips.  And different pistol grips (and revolver grips) require different hand configurations.   The one technique that’s unilaterally ineffective is the tea cup grip.  That’s where your dominant hand maintains a firm middle grip of the pistol and your supporting hand rests beneath the magazine well.  
Here’s a short video that reasonably shows a good technique for Glock-style pistol grips.

For revolvers (and especially compact J-frames), The Yankee Marshall has a very decent video demonstrating grip.

“But wait a second, USA Carry, you just said the teacup grip was a bad idea and Yankee Marshall is saying it’s a good one.”
For small J-frame revolvers, you can get away with a tea cup grip.  Heck, for many shooters, J-frame revolvers are solo-hand carry firearms.  Revolvers are awesome and unfortunately have taken a back seat in the world of high speed, low drag polymer designs and fancy gadgetry.  But there’s plenty of reasons why revolvers are still on the market – and if you’ve got smaller hands and really want to make sure that first round strikes along your sight alignment – a J-frame is definitely worth checking out.
In the end, there’s no one grip fits all approach to firearms.  Preferably, grip as high as you can without snapping your fingers or hands.  Keep your finger clear and off the trigger until you’re ready to fire.  And above all else, experiment at the range so you don’t have to experiment in real life.

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