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One aspect of the U.S. Labor Department's revised compensation requirements for the federal Fair Labor Standards Act's Section 13(a)(1) "white collar" exemptions could mean that some employers will have to keep records of at least some of these exempt employees' hours worked.

Is the U.S. Labor Department correct in suggesting that timekeeping can easily be accomplished via a "simple" timekeeping-by-exceptions system?

Section 3(m) of the federal Fair Labor Standards Act allows a portion of a tipped employee's FLSA-required minimum wages to consist of tips.  Unfortunately, it is all-too-common for employers to make expensive mistakes where tips are concerned.

At long last, the U.S. Labor Department has disclosed the details of its final revised regulations defining the executive, administrative, professional, "outside salesman", and derivative exemptions under the federal Fair Labor Standards Act's Section 13(a)(1).

We have said for a while now that a "fluctuating workweek" pay plan might suit some employers' needs as to workers whom they will no longer treat as overtime-exempt in light of the U.S. Labor Department's coming federal Fair Labor Standards Act exemption changes.

According to Bloomberg BNA, reports are that the new minimum salary for the federal Fair Labor Standards Act's Section 13(a)(1) "white collar" exemptions will annualize to "about" $47,000.

The U.S. Labor Department's commentary regarding its proposed federal Fair Labor Standards Act Section 13(a)(1) exemption regulations said that it might "permit" employers to "count" or "credit" against the impending higher salary threshold unspecified "nondiscretionary bonuses and incentive payments" on some limited, to-be-identified basis.  We summarized USDOL's statements in our prior post, including the agency's having said that it was disinclined to extend this "credit" to "commissions".

The publication date for the U.S. Labor Department's revised federal Fair Labor Standards Act's Section 13(a)(1) "white collar" exemption definitions remains uncertain.  But a growing consensus is that they are likely to be released within the next four weeks or so.

Coming changes in at least some of the U.S. Labor Department's definitions for the federal Fair Labor Standards Act's Section 13(a)(1) "white collar" exemptions are leading employers to evaluate whether employees they treat as exempt meet all of the duties-related requirements.

Congress has responded to the U.S. Labor Department's impending revisions of its FLSA Section 13(a)(1) exemption definitions by introducing nullifying legislation.

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