WNPR

Immigration

Defiant Homeland Security Secretary Defends Family Separations

Updated at 7:55 p.m. ET Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen is continuing to defend the Trump administration's controversial "zero tolerance" policy that results in separating children from their parents who enter the U.S. illegally. Nielsen appeared at the White House press briefing on Monday, falsely blaming Democrats for the current crisis and arguing that the impetus is on Congress to pass a law to close legal loopholes. "What has changed is that we no longer exempt entire...

Read More
SalFalko (Flickr) / Creative Commons

Amid a heated debate about immigration on the Mexican border, immigration attorneys say there’s a much wider crisis in legal representation across the country.

woodleywonderworks / Creative Commons

A last-minute budget move criticized as a “hidden tax” on electric and gas utility customers goes into effect next week. It will take more than $75 million in energy efficiency money collected from consumers and, instead, sweep that money into the state’s general fund.

In a sudden reversal, Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker's administration canceled its plan to send National Guard members and equipment to the southwestern U.S. border, citing the federal government's "inhumane" practice of separating undocumented children from their families.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

United States Senator Chris Murphy told employees of the Mazak Corporation in Windsor Locks Monday that a re-industrialization of America is afoot. He’s excited about Connecticut’s manufacturing jobs outlook, but he said that even more jobs can be had if the Pentagon makes a deeper commitment to “buy American.”

Mark Mirko / Hartford Courant

Richard Robinson has been sworn in as Connecticut’s next Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. He is the first African American to hold the post. 

Nine months after Hurricane Maria devastated the island of Puerto Rico, there are an estimated 300 families still living in hotels in Massachusetts with FEMA and the state footing the bill.

Scott Davidson / Flickr

An 18-year-old died when the stolen vehicle he was riding in crashed during a police chase Thursday in Bridgeport. The city’s police department said the car was being driven by a 15-year-old. 

In Connecticut, third- and fourth-graders study the history of their state. In many schools, students choose to research one person or event from an approved list. The people on that list have been mostly men, and all white.

Updated at 4:28 p.m. ET

The Trump administration's decision to separate children from their families as a way to curb illegal immigration is adding fuel to an already fiery debate over immigration.

A group of House Democrats converged on an immigration detention facility in New Jersey on Sunday, days before a planned vote by House Republicans next week. Meanwhile, Trump administration officials alternately took credit and sought to distance the administration from the family separation policy.

Jesus Garzon / Connecticut Public Radio

New Haven, Hartford, and Springfield are now connected by rail service. The inaugural trains left Friday morning from Springfield and New Haven, meeting in Hartford for a ceremony to mark the opening of the revived line. 

Pages

Get The News

Trouble Keeping Up With News?

Get the WNPR email newsletter daily.

More From Connecticut Public Radio

Tom Tyler, director of Connecticut State Parks, inside Sleeping Giant's picnic area. This and other parts of the park were destroyed following severe storms. Tyler said he's "optimistic" parts will re-open before the fall.
Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

After Devastating Storms, Hamden's Sleeping Giant Has 'Very Different Set Of Clothing'

In May, several tornadoes touched down in Connecticut -- destroying homes, uprooting trees and knocking out power to thousands of customers. The weather also devastated several state parks, including the iconic Sleeping Giant State Park in Hamden.

Read More

The Beaker

Hurricanes Are Moving Slower

That means more time spent over land, more rainfall, and potentially, more danger.

Follow @WNPR on Twitter

Extra Credit

Winner Of Two Regional Edward R. Murrow Awards

For excellence in video and continuing coverage of Connecticut and Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria.

A Note To Our Audience

Connecticut Public Radio's coverage of the 2018 elections.

Coming Soon

Connecticut Public Radio is joining a reporting project to focus on the role of guns in American life.

WNPR Shows

Call in to talk about where we live and who we are. Our show highlights Connecticut's diverse communities -- and we want to hear your stories.
We feature topics that vary widely from day to day. You'll hear a thoughtful, smart, interesting conversation with amazing guests.
Connecticut's best journalists come out of the political trenches every Wednesday for our weekly news roundtable.
Get ideas for easy cooking and healthful living every week.
Our weekly show is about all of New England, America's oldest place, at a time of change.