Lead Story

Mays moves up in Bloomberg Businessweek’s 2016 ranking of best full-time MBA programs in the U.S.

Kelli R. Levey, November 17th, 2016

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The Mays Full-Time MBA Program at Mays Business School ranked 18th overall and 4th among public schools in the “Best full-time MBA programs” rankings by Bloomberg Businessweek. The placement was up from last year’s ranking of 22nd overall and 8th among public schools.

The rankings were based on data for the class that graduated in December 2015 and from feedback from students who graduated between 2008 and 2010. Former students ranked the Mays program favorably – 13th out of 81 programs ranked. Mays also fared well in the employer and job placement categories.

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Senior Mariah Smiley’s nonprofit is more than an extracurricular; it’s a labor of love.

576413_529112773768880_1364884412_nHer organization, called Drops of Love, raises awareness of the scarcity of clean water throughout the world and has sponsored the construction of clean water wells in four villages in El Salvador, Nicaragua and India. Donors are encouraged to give with a guarantee: one dollar provides clean water to one person for one whole year.

“We believe that every single person in this world should have access to clean water. Period,” said Smiley, a management information systems major who serves as president of the organization. “Every single person involved is here because they love the people we’re able to help. 100% of our donations go towards drilling the wells. We pay expenses out of pocket so that every cent can go to help these people that so desperately need something we take for granted in the United States.”

Each well costs $5,000 on average. Builders are sponsored to construct the wells between $1,200 and $2,000, depending on the region and time of year. The wells typically last for years, usually servicing 250-500 people, but one village had as few as eight families.

But when it comes to impact, Smiley believes the size of the village isn’t important. “Bigger organizations often overlook the smaller villages so that they can ‘do more good elsewhere.’ This is true but then who does good in the smaller, less populated villages?”

Her eyes were opened to the water scarcity crisis during a poignant conversation she had with her parents when she was 14. They had returned from a charity fundraiser and explained to Smiley how people frequently died from diseases they contracted through unsafe drinking water. She learned that the good news was that disease was preventable and it didn’t cost much to help – even one dollar could provide one person clean water for an entire year. Smiley recalled thinking: “If I could find a dollar as a 14-year-old, I knew others could too.”4160130_orig

She decided to do her part by forming Drops of Love. Then, at 17, she and her brother registered Drops of Love as an official non-profit and she took the helm as president.

Four years later, Smiley envisions a network of Water Ambassadors associated with Drops of Love who can sponsor their own wells by hosting fundraisers in their own communities. “We see Drops of Love as a vehicle for others who want to help but don’t know how to get started,” she said.

She hopes others can see just how much they are capable of creating an impact. “Everyone has a sphere of influence that they can inspire to change the world. With Drops of Love, we want to provide these leaders with the tools to get out there and make a difference.”

Categories: Mays Business, News, Students, Texas A&M

Ten Mays Business School students were given the MBA Scholar Award Dec. 1 – a new award designed to honor 4.0 graduates from the MBA programs. The celebration at CityCentre Houston was attended by Mays Dean Eli Jones, Associate Dean for Graduate Programs Arvind Mahajan and Assistant Dean for Graduate Programs Michael Kinney celebrated with the Executive MBA and Professional MBA Program Class of 2016 graduates.

Scholars enrolled in the Executive MBA Program were Rajee Hari and Santiago Velasquez. Scholars in the Professional MBA Program were Kenza Bouzaher, Brad Burgess, Lane Cooper, John Doolin, Shelly Fuhrman, Ashley Gibson, Tyler Stegeman and Paul Urane.

The idea for the award came from Bala Shetty, who previously was Interim Associate Dean for Graduate Programs.

MBA Scholar Award winner Brad Burgess said afterward, “The program has done so much for me and opened up many new opportunities. I look forward to helping this program grow and prosper in the future.”

To view photos of the Class of 2016 Scholars Awards Dinner visit https://www.flickr.com/photos/maysbusinessschool/sets/72157677407413586/

Categories: Alumni, Dean Eli Jones, Featured Stories, Mays Business, MBA, News, Programs, Students, Texas A&M

len-berrycroppedLeonard Berry, a marketing professor at Texas A&M University’s Mays Business School, has stepped up his research of cancer care to encompass those closest to the cancer patients – the caregivers. Most often, the caregivers are family members, and are not professionals at caring for patients.

His paper, “Supporting the Supporters: What Family Caregivers Need to Care for a Loved One With Cancer,” is online and will be in the January print issue of Journal of Oncology Practice. The journal is one of the two journals published by the American Society of Clinical Oncology. It is widely read in the oncology community.

“It is an article that I am especially proud of because it addresses a real need to better prepare and support the family caregivers of cancer patients in their caregiving roles,” Berry said. “This is a group that is often overlooked, even though the caregiver is an extension of the medical team.”

Berry’s co-authors are Shraddha Mahesh Dalwadi, who earned her MBA from Mays and is a fourth-year medical student at Texas A&M; and Dr. Joseph O. Jacobson of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School.

The researchers propose a four-part framework for supporting family caregivers:

– Assess caregivers’ needs using formal measures, just as the cancer patient’s own needs are assessed;

– Educate caregivers for their caregiving roles, most notably, with training in the low-level medical support that cancer patients require at home;

– Empower caregivers to become full-fledged members of the patient’s cancer team, all working toward common goals;

– Assist caregivers proactively in their duties, so that they retain a sense of control and self-efficacy rather than having to react to imminent medical crises without sufficient resources at their disposal.

An estimated 4.6 million people in the United States care for someone with cancer at home. Too often, these caregivers—spouses, other family members, or friends—are poorly prepared for this vital but demanding role that takes a toll on them and, by extension, the patient. Only one-third of all caregivers report being asked by a health-care provider what they need to care for the patient; even fewer are asked what they need to care for themselves. That lack of preparation can worsen the anxiety that caregivers already feel about a loved one’s health.

An at-home caregiver typically provides the patient with cancer with at least four types of assistance: daily living activities, medical care, social support and advocacy.

The psychological burden may be even greater for family caregivers than for the patient, especially as the disease advances, and greater for female than for male caregivers. Stress is particularly heavy if caregivers feel ill-prepared: a sense of low self-efficacy heightens the perceived burden, so it is important to develop self-confidence for the caregiving role.

Berry is University Distinguished Professor of Marketing, Regents Professor, and holds the M.B. Zale Chair in Retailing and Marketing Leadership in the Mays Business School at Texas A&M University. He also is a Presidential Professor for Teaching Excellence.

His research has focused on service, particularly in health care, and in recent years more specifically on cancer care.

“I became interested in studying service improvement in cancer care because we are making more progress on clinical care than service care, and when cancer strikes, patients and their families need both,” Berry said. “I am able to leverage my career background as a services researcher and the past 15 years intensively studying healthcare to contribute to our thinking about trying to ease the path for cancer patients and their families.”

As a visiting scientist at Mayo Clinic in 2001-2002, he conducted an in-depth research study of healthcare service, the basis for his book, Management Lessons from Mayo Clinic (2008).  He also has conducted and published field research at Gundersen Health, ThedaCare and Bellin Health, three high-performance health systems in Wisconsin. Concurrent with his faculty position in Mays Business School, Berry is a senior fellow of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement studying service improvement in cancer care for patients and their families.

Berry has written 10 books in all, including Discovering the Soul of Service; On Great Service; Marketing Services: Competing Through Quality; and Delivering Quality Service. He is the author of numerous academic articles and an invited lecturer throughout the world.

 

Categories: Faculty, Featured Stories, Health Care, Marketing, Mays Business, News, Research, Texas A&M

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Happy New Year! Texas A&M’s Mays Business School recently marked or will celebrate several milestones of many of its signature programs in 2017. Here are just a few:

In 1966, over 50 years ago,  the Full-Time MBA program was initiated at Texas A&M University. It is now an 18-month program for young professionals. The Mays MBA programs were expanded in 2012, five years ago, when the Professional MBA program was added to the school’s offerings. The program moved with the Executive MBA program to CityCentre Houston, a mixed-use urban development off Interstate 10 and Beltway 8 in West Houston.

In 1972, 45 years ago, the business school awarded its first Ph.D. The Mays Ph.D. program is currently ranked 8th U.S. public and 13th overall in the U.S. by Financial Times 2015.

In 1992, 25 years ago, the school began recognizing the best of the best of Mays with an annual Outstanding Alumni Award. To date, 79 former students have been recognized with this honor.

In 2008, 10 years ago, Mays joined seven other universities in the EBV Consortium, dedicated to developing veterans in entrepreneurship through the Entrepreneurial Bootcamp for Veterans. Now part of a consortium that includes 10 additional universities across the nation, Texas A&M University continues to offer free training and one-on-one mentoring.

One year ago, in 2016, Mays launched its MS Business program for students who have received non-business bachelor’s degrees and have little or no professional work experience.   The inaugural class class of 41 students represents a wide range of disciplines.

These milestones are just a few examples of Mays Business School’s vision and mission to advance the world’s prosperity by creating impactful knowledge and developing transformational leaders. Share your favorite 2017 milestone with us by tweeting @MaysBusiness.

 

Categories: Centers, Departments, Mays Business, News, Programs, Texas A&M

Eight Mays Business School students have been named 2017 YMA Fashion Scholarship Fund recipients, winning $40,000 in scholarships.

Established in 1937, the Young Menswear Association (YMA) Fashion Scholarship Fund (FSF) is the premier educational fashion non-profit in the United States. FSF offers scholarships to the best and brightest students seeking business, technology and design careers in the fashion industry.

Cheryl Bridges, adjunct professor of marketing at Mays,  teaches the Advanced Retail Case Study course (MKTG 426). She said the advanced retail case study course is designed to challenge each student to “use critical thinking to develop a business plan that is both viable and creative providing financial and marketing solutions.” The class is part of the certificate in retailing curriculum through the Center for Retailing Studies.

Students evaluated the recent partnership between Etsy, an online marketplace for selling and buying unique goods, and Macy’s – the 159 year-old chain. To combat the trend of successful sellers leaving the site, Etsy Manufacturing, it opened The Etsy Shop at Macy’s Herald Square. This gave Etsy sellers physical store space at one of America’s busiest and famous department stores. The partnership also allowed Macy’s an assortment of artisanal products that many millennials desire.

Students were asked to (1) identify the end-use customer the collaboration should target and (2) identify Etsy sellers who would create the most demand. By envisioning their role as the Director of Special Merchandising Projects at Macy’s, they also developed a marketing campaign and six-month financial plan for The Etsy Shop.

In total, 229 students were selected out of 569 applications from 58 schools, including Cornell, University of California-Berkeley, FIT-Fashion Institute of Technology and the Wharton School of Business.

Each winner will receive a $5,000 scholarship and will travel to New York City in January to be recognized at a formal awards gala. The scholarship also guarantees a fashion internship in New York City during the summer 2017.

Bridges and the eight scholarship recipients network with over 1,500 executives, including influential fashion designers, retail CEOs and top manufacturer brands.

 Texas A&M University has been recognized in the top 10 percent of universities across the country for having the most winners. Since 2012, FSF has awarded 35 scholarships to Mays Business School students, totaling $175,000.

2017 Scholarship Recipients:

  • Leslie Bonorden, Marketing ’18
  • Loryn Setterquist, Business Honors ’18
  • Alex Marks, Marketing ’18
  • Tori Kloeppel, Supply Chain Management ’17
  • Sarah Stroup, Business Honors/Marketing ’17
  • Frances Uzoukwu, Marketing ’17
  • Riden Reiter, Marketing ’17
  • Tess Williamson, Marketing ’17

Categories: Centers, Departments, Mays Business, News, Students, Texas A&M

Texas A&M University senior Sarah Shaw is most enthusiastic about the future. The twist is it’s not her own future that’s exciting her, which has been her approach to life since her elementary school days.

“I’m excited about it because it blends my two biggest passions,” Shaw said. “I’ve played soccer since I was 6, and I’ve volunteered at the food pantry since I was 10. It’s always been one of my biggest goals to have a nonprofit, so why not start now?”

Shaw’s idea is much like TOMS Shoes, which matches shoe purchases one for one and donates the second pair to children in need. For every soccer ball Goals for Bowls sells or donation it receives, the organization will donate a soccer ball and meal to a child in Nepal or Ghana.

Charity work runs in Shaw’s family, which has logged more than 1,000 volunteer hours at the Community Enrichment Center in North Richland Hills in Fort Worth, where her father serves on the board.

“It’s always been a big part of my life, volunteering and giving food to people,” Shaw said. “I interned there to get the feel of how to run a nonprofit, and it’s been one of my biggest goals to have a nonprofit, so why not start now.”

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Categories: Entrepreneurship, Mays Business, News, Students, Texas A&M

andrew-jarrettA startup that competed in the annual MBA Venture Challenge at Mays Business School in February was recently admitted to Startup Aggieland as a client company. It joined the campus-based accelerator program’s Lifestyle group, exclusive for early-stage ventures that generate revenue.

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ResponderX is a team of technical, non-technical and emergency service providers who are dedicated to engineering safety solutions for firefighters across the nation. Volunteer firefighter Andrew Jarrett formed the company team to promote the use of TaskForceTracker, his patent-pending technology consisting of small device attaches to the top of firefighter helmets and is able to provide critical information such as location and condition of the personnel on the scene.

He said he was inspired to create TaskForce technology to save lives after two local firemen lost their lives during a Feb. 2013 rescue at the Knights of Colombus hall. “Someone got lost in the fire and we had to go search for him,” Jarrett recalled. “When the dust settled, we realized that the guy they came to rescue was very close to an external door to the back building. That’s when it came to me that there is a better way to do this.”

ResponderX founders Jarrett and Jerry Lozano participated in the annual MBA Venture Challenge through Mays Business School at Texas A&M University in February 2016. Over an intensive two-week period, they worked with two Texas A&M MBA students whose task was to complete an in-depth analysis of the business and market segment of Jarrett’s startup company, ResponderX.

“Armed with the research provided to ResponderX by the MBA team, we were able to approach serious investors for the first time with a truly accurate depiction of our business valuation and well-documented market research,” said Jarrett.

The information helped Jarrett raise almost $200,000 in funding.

“The MBA Venture Challenge may have been one of the single most important things to happen to our startup in the past year,” Jarrett explained. “The research, projections, and recommendations provided to me by the student team we were partnered with were priceless, and we continue to use the materials they created to help us in our projections to this day.”

As a client company of Startup Aggieland, ResponderX has been assigned three mentors:

  • Startup Aggieland Entrepreneur-in-Residence Nathan Day, a retired founding CTO of SoftLayer and Texas A&M former student who lives near Austin;
  • Startup Aggieland Entrepreneur-in-Residence Brian Kralyevich, a VP UX for Amazon in Seattle and a Texas A&M former student;
  • Dave Manzer, an Aggie mentor for Startup Aggieland who owns Manzer Communications in Austin;
  • Shelly Brenckman, a student co-founder and marketing coordinator as well as manager of the CNVE Mentor Network and Startup Aggieland’s Dormcubator.
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Burnt gear from the firefighters who died in February 2013 is used to demonstrate how important safety is on the fireground.

Categories: Centers, Entrepreneurship, Featured Stories, Management, Mays Business, MBA, News, Startup Aggieland, Texas A&M

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(Paletta, Dang, Strawser and Kelly)

Mays Business School recognized four of its most engaged and productive former students with the 2016 Outstanding Alumni Award on Nov. 10. The 2016 recipients are Louis Paletta ’78T. Mark Kelly ’79, Jerry Strawser ’83 and Kimberly Allen Dang ’92. All are graduates of the accounting program.

Paletta is a founding partner, board member and chief operating officer of Kildare Partners. He has served Texas A&M
University as a member of the board of trustees of the 12th Man Foundation and as a member of the Dean’s Advisory Board at Mays, where he currently serves as chairman of the fundraising and development committee. At the banquet, he shared his life philosophies: “You’re only as good as your word and you can never go wrong taking the high road.”

Kelly is chairman of Vinson & Elkins LLP, an international law firm with approximately 700 lawyers across the globe. His practice is concentrated on mergers and acquisitions, capital markets and corporate governance. Under Kelly’s leadership, the firm has posted record revenues and net income and has nine domestic and seven international offices. Kelly serves on the Dean’s Advisory Board at Mays and is a member of the Champions Council and the Council of Athletic Ambassadors. He said he is impressed with the passion and desire to be the best he sees in the current students. “I hope through our work, we will continue to attract the best and the brightest to Mays Business School.”

Strawser holds the KPMG Chair in Accounting at Mays and serves as executive vice president of finance and administration and chief financial officer of Texas A&M University. He oversees a budget of more than $1.6 billion and works with the university and Texas A&M System leadership to develop and identify funding for strategic university priorities. He was dean of Mays 2001-2007 and 2008-2014, and interim executive vice president and provost of Texas A&M 2007-2008. He commented on the character of the school’s current students. “They don’t just want to get a job, they want to make a difference. They have huge brains, and they also have huge, huge hearts.”

Dang is vice president, chief financial officer and a member of the Office of the Chairman of Kinder Morgan, the largest energy infrastructure company in North America. After graduating from Texas A&M, she earned an MBA from the J.L. Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University. She said she will always be grateful for the foundation Texas A&M provided for her life. “Many years ago my father told me the broader you build the base, the higher you can build the tower. Texas A&M provided a strong base on which I continue to build.”

The 2017 Mays Business School Outstanding Alumni Awards Dinner will be held on April 6, 2017. The deadline to submit nominations is Jan. 15, 2017.

 

Categories: Alumni, Dean Eli Jones, Featured Stories, Mays Business, News, Texas A&M

A scholarship and a Disney movie helped Mays Business School student Arden Robertson achieve her dreams of attending Texas A&M University and working for NASA. Arden will graduate in December with a bachelor’s degree in Business Honors and accounting as well as a master’s degree in management information systems as part of Mays’ Professional Program in Accounting.

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Student speaker Arden Robertson

She spoke at the Mays 2016 Scholarship Banquet Nov. 3 about how the Disney movie “Toy Story” influenced her life. She identified more with than Woody the cowboy, and has parlayed three summer internships at NASA into a job offer there upon graduation.

“All because of one scholarship, I was able to be just like Woody and achieve the Western dream while keeping intact core values and emulate Buzz by going to the infinity and beyond by working with NASA,” she told about 500 attendees at the Zone Club at Kyle Field. “Needless to say, just getting the opportunity to come to Texas [from Florida] and attend Texas A&M was a dream come true in itself! However, the dream kept getting better.”

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Categories: Dean Eli Jones, Donors Corner, Featured Stories, Mays Business, News, Programs, Students, Texas A&M

Mays Business School’s Center for New Ventures and Entrepreneurship (CNVE) celebrated its 12th Annual Aggie 100 Program on Nov. 11, honoring the top 100 fastest-growing Aggie-owned and -led businesses. The 12th Man stands as an important symbol for Texas A&M University, and the 12th anniversary Aggie 100 honored all past and present honorees.

31054582776_095930f21e_zThe Class of 2016 honorees were recognized before more than 850 attendees at a first-of-its-kind Aggie 100 Reunion Gala event on Friday night in the Hall of Champions at Texas A&M’s Kyle Field. The 2016 honorees were highlighted by 13 companies in the business and financial services industry, along with more than 40 companies within the construction, real estate and architectural industries. These Aggie entrepreneurs have shown that combining their passions with an unwavering drive to succeed, a healthy dose of patience and integrity to maintaining Aggie Core Values can help make Aggie companies an “overnight success.”

This year’s Summit Award was presented to the Aggie company with the highest average revenue from 2013 to 2015. James Goodman ’95, founder of Genesis Networks Enterprises in San Antonio, was honored as the 2016 Aggie 100 Summit Award recipient, with an average revenue of $868,651,989.

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Categories: Alumni, Centers, Entrepreneurship, Featured Stories, Management, Mays Business, News, Texas A&M