RT Cunningham https://www.rtcx.net Wed, 23 May 2018 23:54:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.6 https://www.rtcx.net/ifiles/cropped-pen-1-150x150.png RT Cunningham https://www.rtcx.net 32 32 Alaska Employment Final Update – She’s Probably Never Going There https://www.rtcx.net/alaska-employment-final-update Thu, 17 May 2018 14:28:38 +0000 https://www.rtcx.net/?p=4469 Josie, my wife, really wanted to work in Alaska. She had me do everything for her except the interviews. She was offered employment but she had to withdraw her application. You see, both Josie and I forgot one important detail. She has a single health issue that put the brakes on everything.. Alaska Employment isn’t […]

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Josie, my wife, really wanted to work in Alaska. She had me do everything for her except the interviews.

She was offered employment but she had to withdraw her application. You see, both Josie and I forgot one important detail. She has a single health issue that put the brakes on everything..

Alaska Employment isn’t the Issue

I don’t want to mention Josie’s health issue publicly. It’s enough to mention it was caused by heavy lifting at her last job. No, I’m not talking about hemorrhoids. She dealt with hemorrhoids as a result of childbirth more than 30 years ago.

This is why Josie accepted the offer (and accepted on my behalf) from our older son, Joe. He offered to buy our tickets to Florida. She wanted to get away from here for a while and an extended visit to Florida and then Hawaii (where our older son is living) will do the trick just as well as a trip to Alaska. Probably better.

Alaska or Some Place Cold is where I’d Like to Be

This month, May of 2018, has to be the hottest humid month I’ve endured in years. Temperatures exceeding 90 degrees Fahrenheit with humidity percentages trying to reach 100, and without any rain to accompany it, make me more miserable than I should be during this time of the year.

I’m not the only one complaining. Every single one of my relatives, all Filipinos of course, are complaining about it every day. That includes Josie. My response to their complaints, along with my agreement, is that it’s worse for me since I haven’t lived her all my life.

I wanted to go to Alaska. I really did. When I realized I couldn’t go, I was really bummed out. When Josie realized she couldn’t go, she complained in my ear when both of us should have been sleeping. I was happy she accepted Joe’s offer, whether I agreed with it or not. I need my sleep.

Florida isn’t cold. Neither is Hawaii. I doubt either places ever get as hot and humid as this place, the Philippines. Anyway… I think I’ll have to wait for our children and their families to get stationed (one of each is in the military) someplace where it actually gets cold.

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I Paid My Car Loan Off Nearly Two and a Half Years Early https://www.rtcx.net/paid-car-loan Wed, 16 May 2018 08:27:50 +0000 https://www.rtcx.net/?p=4466 I bought my car in October of 2015. I wrote about my car loan here. Today, I paid it off. To explain how I did it would take more effort than it’s worth. I don’t have the original paperwork in front of me to see the original car loan price. I only know that I […]

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I bought my car in October of 2015. I wrote about my car loan here. Today, I paid it off.

To explain how I did it would take more effort than it’s worth. I don’t have the original paperwork in front of me to see the original car loan price. I only know that I paid about 301,000 pesos (around $5700 USD at the current foreign currency exchange rate) to close it out.

It will be My Last Car Loan in the Philippines

After I bought the car in 2015, I learned of a real age discrimination issue. If the auto loan application requirements at Philippine National Bank are any indication, I won’t be able to get another car loan if the loan period takes me to the age of 66 at any bank in the Philippines. While other banks I looked up don’t have it listed online, I’m sure they discriminate in most of the same ways.

To be honest, I don’t really care. I have yet to drive the car I just paid the car loan off for. Josie (my wife) hasn’t driven it much (less than 100 times, I’m sure). A male bilas (a sister-in-law’s husband, Alex) drives it more often than anyone. He’s our driver when he’s not driving his taxi.

Perhaps I’ll take steps while Josie and I are on our United States visit to set up an alternate loan source (like Navy Federal Credit Union or USAA). I doubt I’ll even think about it after I leave this place.

The Pay Off Amount was Higher than I Expected

That’s because I had to pay a prepayment penalty, listed as a service charge on my final statement of account. My total savings is only 30,000 pesos in unpaid interest. I don’t remember the exact amount of the “service charge”, but my total savings would have been more than 50,000 pesos without it, or more than $1000 USD.

If I’m not mistaken, prepayment penalties are all but extinct in the United States. Unfortunately, banking practices in the Philippines are sorely behind the times. I still can’t make online payments for any services that don’t accept debit cards (which is almost all of them).

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The EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and My Website https://www.rtcx.net/gdpr-website Sun, 13 May 2018 01:55:36 +0000 https://www.rtcx.net/?p=4464 The EU GDPR is causing both businesses and individuals to scramble all over the world at almost the last minute. The regulation goes into effect on May 25, 2018, and a lot of them are still not complying. I’m sure it’s due to a lot of confusion more than anything else. I’m not going to […]

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The EU GDPR is causing both businesses and individuals to scramble all over the world at almost the last minute. The regulation goes into effect on May 25, 2018, and a lot of them are still not complying. I’m sure it’s due to a lot of confusion more than anything else.

I’m not going to try to explain the GDPR. I don’t even completely understand it.

My Website and GDPR Issues

I don’t store data at this website, other than the server logs. The big issue is personal data collection. The third-party services I’ve used, Google Analytics and Google AdSense, can collect personal data. I don’t have control over their data retention policies.

According to Google, since my website is pure AMP and I use amp-ads instead of desktop ads, I only need to do one thing. In the AdSense UI, I have to select “non-personalized ads” on the new “EU user consent” tab. The relevant text:

If your AMP ad tags do not use Real Time Config (RTC), you may simply enable non-personalized ad serving in the DoubleClick for Publishers or AdSense UIs, and no further changes to your AMP pages are needed.

I’ve already done it and I wish it was that easy with Google Analytics. I’ve replaced the Google Analytics code with the amp-pixel tracking code and updated my privacy policy.

GDPR Compliance

As far as I can tell, I’m in full compliance already. The only thing that could possibly trip me up is AdSense. I have to trust that Google is telling me the truth. The part that irritates me the most is that I rarely make money from EU member countries.

Since I’m running a static website without any local forms, I shouldn’t have any issues in the future. Perhaps my decision to go completely static has helped me avoid what a lot of dynamic websites have had to go through and are still going through.

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Self-Signed SSL Certificates in Google Chrome 58 and Later https://www.rtcx.net/self-signed-ssl-certificates-chrome-58 Sat, 12 May 2018 08:01:52 +0000 https://www.rtcx.net/?p=4461 I sometimes think Google screws things up on purpose. Such is the issue of self-signed SSL certificates and the Chrome web browser. I’m using Chrome 66 and this issue has existed since Chrome 58. Why is it nearly impossible to get self-signed certificates working in Chrome? With Firefox, you only need to add an exception […]

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I sometimes think Google screws things up on purpose. Such is the issue of self-signed SSL certificates and the Chrome web browser. I’m using Chrome 66 and this issue has existed since Chrome 58.

Why is it nearly impossible to get self-signed certificates working in Chrome? With Firefox, you only need to add an exception and it will never ask again.

The Google Chrome Issue

Let’s forget the fact, for a moment, that the old self-signed certificates (without a subject alternate name or SAN) won’t work in Chrome 58 and later. The issue I faced, and decided to ignore, is getting Chrome to import a self-signed certificate.

I don’t know if it will import the old ones. I only know it won’t import the news ones. And I don’t think this is a Linux-only issue.

I’m going to show you how to create an SSL certificate on Ubuntu. This will probably work on any platform other than Windows.

Creating the Key and the Certificate

This works. It’s exactly what I used:

openssl req \
    -newkey rsa:2048 \
    -keyout rtcx.local.key \
    -x509 \
    -nodes \
    -new \
    -out rtcx.local.crt \
    -subj "/CN=*.rtcx.local" \
    -reqexts SAN \
    -extensions SAN \
    -config <(cat /etc/ssl/openssl.cnf \
        <(printf '[SAN]\nsubjectAltName=DNS:*.rtcx.local')) \
    -sha256 \
    -days 3650

Why the wildcard? So I won’t have to deal with this every time I’m working with subdomains on localhost.

What about the Chrome Warning?

The warning: Your connection is not private. You can click on link for “ADVANCED” and then click on the “proceed to…” link and the page will load. You’ll see a red “not secure” flag along with the “https” with a line through it up in the address bar.

Put this in address bar:

chrome://flags/#allow-insecure-localhost

The first sentence on the page should be highlighted. Click the “enable” button.

The next time you bring up your web browser and load the page, it will still show the red warnings but you won’t have to click on anything to get past anything.

Why not use Firefox?

I’m an old dog and I’m set in my ways. I prefer using the same web browser for everything. If I decide to use Firefox for web development, I’ll use it for everything else as well.

I’ve developed a routine when it comes to working on the web. I don’t like any kind of change that will disrupt that routine. Switching web browsers will definitely disrupt that routine.

I have a theory. I think you can get an SSL certificate from Let’s Encrypt if you use a public TLD instead of private one. You can get free domain names at Freenom. They’re not great TLDs but if they’re used for local web development, who cares?

I’m going to test my theory and get back with you.

Several hours later…

It works but only until I get a new IP address during a reset or brownout. This would work well for a person with a static IP address. Good luck with that.

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Personalities and Names – Sometimes One is Not Enough https://www.rtcx.net/personalities-names Wed, 09 May 2018 05:00:05 +0000 https://www.rtcx.net/personalities-names.html When it comes to personalities and names, there are times when having one of each is simply not enough. Aliases, nicknames, pen names, and personas are sometimes necessary to change perceptions. Some people may be perceived as having multiple personality disorders (not schizophrenia) when they really don’t. Most of the time, multiple personalities are intentional. […]

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When it comes to personalities and names, there are times when having one of each is simply not enough. Aliases, nicknames, pen names, and personas are sometimes necessary to change perceptions.

Some people may be perceived as having multiple personality disorders (not schizophrenia) when they really don’t. Most of the time, multiple personalities are intentional.

Names, Nicknames and Aliases

In most cultures, people have one given name, the one they’re born with. This is the name that appears on a birth certificate. Some parents aren’t satisfied with addressing their children by their given names. They give them nicknames and sometimes the nicknames have nothing to do with the given names.

In some countries, including the United States and the Philippines, it’s perfectly lawful to use two names. One is a birth name and one is an alias. Obviously, the birth name is the name on the birth certificate. Not so obviously, the alias is the name that the person is known by.

Media Personalities – Pen Names and Stage Names

It’s very common for actor or an author to use an alias. When an author does it, it’s called a pen name and when an actor does it, it’s called a stage name. If I think about it long enough, I can probably think of other types of media personalities who use aliases.

Some media personalities keep their aliases secret and get angry when they’re discovered (J. K. Rowling/Robert Galbraith). Others don’t really care (Stephen King/Richard Bachman/John Swithen). It seems the ones who care are those that are trying to pretend they’re something they’re not.


While authors or writers can get away with creating multiple personalities, actors can’t. Actor names are associated with faces. Authors and writers may have a face associated with a name, but only one name.

Online Names and Personalities

It happens a lot with blogs. A male writer will use a female name and personality to capture a certain audience and a female writer will do the same thing, in reverse. From what I’ve seen, it tends to work well for them until they’re discovered. The backlash from followers or fans can be horrendous.

Worse than “fake” personalities online are the personalities who won’t show themselves. Although a byline isn’t required, visitors shouldn’t have to guess whether you’re male or female, or any other details that show your personality. It can sometimes be discerned by what you write or the way you write but your name can’t be obtained that way.

There may be more than one reason to use multiple personalities online, but having multiple personalities to match multiple websites is the only good one I can think of.

One Name, One Personality

I prefer to use one name and one personality on multiple websites. Of course, the first part of my online name is a nickname. It’s the one I chose out of all the nicknames given to me by my parents, siblings and friends over the years.

I use the same name on every website I write or post on, RT Cunningham. I figure if I make a mistake, I’ll own it. There may come a time when I’ll want to create other personalities but I don’t think I could ever get away with using an opposite gender.

Originally published in August of 2013. Updated with minor corrections.

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RT Cunningham, My Name, is the New Title of this Website https://www.rtcx.net/rt-cunningham-title-website Tue, 08 May 2018 05:34:23 +0000 https://www.rtcx.net/?p=4457 Yes, RT Cunningham is the new title of the website, the same as my name. It started out as simply “RTCX” to match the domain name in 2011 (although I didn’t write anything here until 2013). I changed it to RTCXpression in 2013, thinking it might make it more unique and attract more visitors. It […]

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Yes, RT Cunningham is the new title of the website, the same as my name. It started out as simply “RTCX” to match the domain name in 2011 (although I didn’t write anything here until 2013).

I changed it to RTCXpression in 2013, thinking it might make it more unique and attract more visitors. It didn’t seem to matter. I changed it back to RTCX at the beginning of 2018. To be honest, I didn’t like seeing “RTCXpression” at the top of my screen all the time. It became annoying. I can’t get annoyed by my name.

RT Cunningham in Vanity Searches

Every week or so, I’ll do a vanity search for either “RTCX” or “RT Cunningham” or both. RTCX, by itself, never shows up on the first page of any search engine I use. RT Cunningham does. In fact, it brings up the home page because my name is in the meta description.

The domain name and TLD, rtcx.net, will show up on the first page and a few pages after it. That’s because it’s in each URL. No one will search for it, of course, except me. I’m sure someone, even if they’re not looking for me, will search for “RT Cunningham”. It seems to be fairly common.

I think having a title on a website like this is silly anyway. Unfortunately, it has to have one.

But will it Stick?

I think so. It’s easy to get another domain name it I want to use another title. As I step beyond my middle-age years, however, I think this is it.

I don’t know how long I’ll continue writing, here or anywhere else. Things aren’t the way they were before 2011, when personal websites were abundant. When they still showed up in searches.

I blame Facebook and Google for all of it. Facebook for stealing everyone’s attention (or so it seems). Google for penalizing people who didn’t behave like Google wanted them to behave.

Most bloggers have long since given up. I knew quite a few of them. Searches for old domain names and website titles return other things today.

But I’m optimistic. Things change. They always do. With all the privacy issues on the web these days, people may give up on big sites like Facebook. What happens after that will be anyone’s guess.

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Preventing Session Hijacking when using PHP, with and without SSL https://www.rtcx.net/preventing-session-hijacking-using-php Tue, 08 May 2018 01:00:18 +0000 https://www.rtcx.net/preventing-session-hijacking-using-php.html Session hijacking can occur on standard HTTP pages. It can also occur when SSL (HTTPS) isn’t implemented correctly. There are measures you can take to make session hijacking difficult, if not impossible, for all but the most experienced hackers. I’ll go over these briefly and let you make up your mind how much security you […]

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Session hijacking can occur on standard HTTP pages. It can also occur when SSL (HTTPS) isn’t implemented correctly. There are measures you can take to make session hijacking difficult, if not impossible, for all but the most experienced hackers.

I’ll go over these briefly and let you make up your mind how much security you need. It’s easy to get complacent when you don’t understand the risks.

PHP Sessions

Probably the most important thing is to make sure PHP is using only cookies for sessions. If a session ID is included in a URL, simply posting the complete URL somewhere invites session hijacking attempts. Also, session regeneration techniques would break the back button because the URL would change each time.

Session cookies aren’t immune to interception, but they can be made worthless to anyone else. Human beings can’t move as fast as sessions can be changed. Session files must be stored in a server location only accessible by one server user and one website at a time. Session files can be manipulated otherwise (think shared hosting), thus altering those session cookies.

The httpOnly Flag

When checking the PHP runtime settings, this flag should always be set to “1” (without the quotes). You shouldn’t rely on it already being set. You should make sure you set it when you’re configuring your application.

One thing to be aware of is that you have to set the session cookie name before you can set the parameters. You also have to use the session name when destroying the session. While this flag is disputed as effective against XSS among developers, any extra protection measure is worth implementing.

Regenerating the Session ID

When using the cookie-only approach to sessions, the web browser’s back button will function normally. While it may seem like overkill, you can regenerate the session ID on every page load. An attacker would have to be able to duplicate it from the outside, using HTTP headers, in a small window of opportunity every time.

The proper way to do it is to set the flag to true (wiping out session data) upon a successful login and setting it to false on every occasion after that.

Using a Web Browser Fingerprint to Prevent Session Hijacking

It can’t be done using PHP only and it requires storing certain HTTP environment variables and comparing them with what’s being received with every page load. IP addresses and user agents aren’t reliable because both can change from one page load to the next.

You can use certain JavaScript environment variables to help prevent session hijacking, but this will only work if your users have JavaScript turned on (the default in every major web browser). It also requires running JavaScript code on every page to fetch the variables.

This technique isn’t something I can recommend even though a few prominent websites are using it. (It’s how they can tell you’re using a different web browser or computer when logging in, even at the same IP address.)


Re-Authentication to make Session Hijacking Worthless

If you have a membership site of some kind, your members have to log on or log in, right? They obviously know what their credentials are. If you have a secure login form of some kind, you can create pages that require the same parameters when someone posts something. By doing so, you can make session hijacking useless.

The key here is that the member should have a password manager. Most of the major web browsers have add-ons like LastPass that will store the data securely. There are also specific programs for various operating systems as well, like KeePass Password Safe. These things are free!

If nothing else, most modern web browsers will let you store your data within the web browsers themselves. It’s something I can only recommend if your web browser isn’t being used by anyone else.

You can let attackers read all they want. If they need credentials to actually post something, they can’t do it unless they already have those credentials. Something like this would probably cause a typical attacker to give up. Using a JavaScript utility like store.js to store credentials would make re-authentication a breeze.

When you begin something like this, you have to be sure every person who registers is aware of what’s required. If your website requires JavaScript and cookies, make it clear. The best place is the registration and login screens themselves. If they’re going to be required to re-enter their login credentials to post, make that clear as well.

You’re going to get a percentage of people who won’t read the instructions and another percentage who won’t read them well enough to understand what they mean. You need to be ready and offer other avenues like contact forms, sticky posts or whatever else you can think of to minimize support requests.

Using SSL to Prevent Session Hijacking

Using SSL is the only way to insure against session hijacking and even then it can still be done. The SSL secure flag must be set with the session cookie or it won’t be encrypted by the SSL handshake.

Regardless of what method you use, with or without SSL, you should always store confidential information in an encrypted state. That way, even if an attacker should break in, minimal damage can occur and the rest of the private data stays private.

Originally published in August of 2013. Updated for readability and minor corrections.

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Syncthing Once Again – Because FTP isn’t Reliable Enough https://www.rtcx.net/syncthing Sat, 05 May 2018 11:53:55 +0000 https://www.rtcx.net/?p=4455 I wrote about Syncthing here, a little less than three months ago. Not long after that, I decided to switch to FTP. A single PHP script was in control. I have since reverted to Syncthing, with a slightly different setup. FTP didn’t work out for me. Syncthing instead of FTP There was nothing wrong with […]

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I wrote about Syncthing here, a little less than three months ago.

Not long after that, I decided to switch to FTP. A single PHP script was in control. I have since reverted to Syncthing, with a slightly different setup. FTP didn’t work out for me.

Syncthing instead of FTP

There was nothing wrong with the PHP script I used to upload files to my server. The problem was that the connection would time out for various reasons.

I’m in the Philippines and my server is in San Francisco, California, USA. I’m positive periods of latency caused the timeouts, along with my low upload bandwidth. It’s a DSL connection, not fiber.

Even with only two WiFi connections (the cell phone and the laptop), uploads of any kind would cause problems. Syncthing doesn’t suffer from low upload bandwidth. It picks up right where it left off.

Installing and Configuring Syncthing

The instructional article at LinuxBabe.com is a good guide for both the desktop and the server, except for the web browser bit with the server.

The last time I set it up, I wasted time by setting up an Nginx proxy. All I had to do was change the IP address for the GUI in the configuration file from “127.0.0.1” to “0.0.0.0”. I could then use my server’s IP address followed by a colon a port number. The configuration file is here:

/home/[user name]/.config/syncthing/config.xml

The GUI line is pretty easy to find.

Syncthing and Security

I’m now using Syncthing to synchronize my web server directories. The only hurdle I had to jump over was making sure the directories matched. That wasn’t easy to do with the directories I use for my static site generator.

I haven’t set it up yet, but I’ll be using it for my backups as well. When I last checked, I had 22 gigabytes of my 25 gigabytes disk quota remaining. If I don’t rotate the backups properly, I could probably eat up all that space in short order. Luckily, I only have to rotate them in a specified local directory and Syncthing will take care of the rest.

I’m using the GUI for the server with HTTPS, with a very strong password (which is stored as a Bcrypt hash). I’m using the GUI on my laptop computer, but I’m not going to bother with HTTPS on it since I’m the only person who uses this machine.

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Windows 10 – Keep it Running Fast and Keep the Registry Clean https://www.rtcx.net/windows-10 Wed, 02 May 2018 07:41:58 +0000 https://www.rtcx.net/?p=4452 I have not used Windows 10 for anything at all since I started using Linux Mint regularly. I only have one laptop computer with Windows 10 on it and the monitor isn’t working right. I’m going to replace that laptop computer with another one when my wife and I visit our children and their families […]

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I have not used Windows 10 for anything at all since I started using Linux Mint regularly. I only have one laptop computer with Windows 10 on it and the monitor isn’t working right.

I’m going to replace that laptop computer with another one when my wife and I visit our children and their families in the United States.

Windows 10 – Keep it Running Fast

Microsoft has always amazed me by its lack of foresight. Third-party utilities always rise up to fill in the gaps, and that really shouldn’t be the case.

The easiest way to keep it running fast is to not add anything to it. Unfortunately, Windows 10 doesn’t come with most of the software you need to use regularly. If you want to add software to Windows 10 without adding to the registry bloat, you can use portable applications from within the PortableApps platform. Other than the platform itself, it doesn’t add anything to the registry.

Using Glary Utilities 5 is another way to keep Windows 10 running fast. It has over 20 built-in tools to maximize performance. It can also be used to keep the registry clean, but other tools are probably better at it.

If you’re adventurous, you may want to examine a master tutorial on the subject.

Windows 10 – Keep the Registry Clean

There is one tool, a singular software item, that I trust implicitly to keep the registry clean. It’s CCleaner, a tool I started using way back when it was called “Crap Cleaner”.

I started using Windows with the 16-bit 3.11 version in 1994. With all the advances leading to the current version, Microsoft still can’t seem to get it all right. I sometimes think it’s a design decision.

Using Linux with Windows 10

There are two ways I’m familiar with. One is to use a Linux USB flash drive and the other is to set up dual booting.

There’s another way and it’s probably still considered beta software. It’s the Windows Subsystem for Linux. I’m planning to learn everything I can about it. If it works the way I understand it, it’ll make a great backup to my Linux only laptop computer.

Most Linux distributions are fast right out-of-the-box and it takes a lot of memory consumption to slow them down. That’s been my experience so far. Windows 10 would probably be just as fast if Microsoft hadn’t invented the registry in the first place. The bigger the registry gets, the more memory it consumes. That bloat also slows everything down.

Believe me, I’ll be practicing what I preach when I buy a new laptop computer with Windows 10 on it. I’m not as patient with software as I used to be and I don’t need anything at all testing my patience.

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I Found Iced Coffee at a Place where I didn’t Expect it – Dunkin’ Donuts https://www.rtcx.net/iced-coffee-dunkin-donuts Sun, 29 Apr 2018 07:10:07 +0000 https://www.rtcx.net/?p=4448 There are three well-known coffee franchises in the Philippines. I’ve seen Starbucks, Seattle’s Best and The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf. The only one in that list I’ve had iced coffee at is Starbucks. I’ve known forever that you can get hot coffee and donuts at Dunkin’ Donuts. I didn’t know about their iced coffee. […]

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There are three well-known coffee franchises in the Philippines. I’ve seen Starbucks, Seattle’s Best and The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf. The only one in that list I’ve had iced coffee at is Starbucks.

I’ve known forever that you can get hot coffee and donuts at Dunkin’ Donuts. I didn’t know about their iced coffee. Not until yesterday, that is.

Iced Coffee at Dunkin’ Donuts

There is a small Dunkin’ Donuts at the Harbor Point Ayala Mall at the Subic Bay Freeport Zone. It’s but one of many American franchise businesses residing there. The mall is large enough that I have yet to step foot in even half of the stores that interest me.

Yesterday, while I was waiting for my wife to get her nails done, I went into the Dunkin’ Donuts nearby for nothing more than to rest my feet. The one thing the mall lacks is chairs anywhere outside the restaurants.

I was thirsty but I didn’t want hot coffee. They sold bottled water but it wasn’t on their menu. I only know that because a girl who came in after I got my order bought one. Anyway… I noticed iced coffee on their menu. The names were a little weird – it was the first time I ever saw the word “frio”.

I ordered a “rocky road frio” and it was delicious, with more ice cream and chocolate than coffee. I could have had a plain iced coffee, but I figured I get something a little fancier for my money. It cost me 125 pesos, which is about $2.40 at the current exchange rate. It’s still less expensive than anything at Starbucks.

Iced Coffee Elsewhere

I rarely buy iced coffee at restaurants. I rarely buy cold coffee of any kind. I may have to change my habits.

My daughter-in-law, my younger son’s wife, spends a lot of time at the Harbor Point mall. It seems she buys iced coffee at “The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf” almost every time she’s there. I have yet to step foot in that place.

I prefer hot lattes or cappuccinos most of the time. I only drink iced coffee when there’s nothing hot available. I don’t usually drink anything at all when I’m out and about unless the trip includes a food stop of some kind. If I get thirsty, I’m more likely to buy bottled water. If I’m just a little thirsty, I can pick up canned coffee at almost any convenience store.

As you can probably guess, I’m not fond of soft drinks, especially when it’s extra hot outside.

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