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SeattleMediaMaven http://www.seattlemediamaven.com Understanding the Seattle Market and the Media That Deliver It Wed, 06 Jan 2016 21:56:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.5.1
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Seattle Market Digest: Keeping up with Seattle http://www.seattlemediamaven.com/2016/01/07/seattle-market-digest-keeping-up-with-seattle/ http://www.seattlemediamaven.com/2016/01/07/seattle-market-digest-keeping-up-with-seattle/#respond Thu, 07 Jan 2016 13:06:03 +0000 http://www.seattlemediamaven.com/?p=1155 Opportunities come to those in the know, but keeping up can be a daunting endeavor. The red-hot Seattle economy only adds to the challenge. To the rescue: Seattle Market Digest The Seattle Market Digest is a monthly compilation of the ups and downs and comings and goings in greater Seattle’s retail, travel, real-estate development and...

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Seattle market digestOpportunities come to those in the know, but keeping up can be a daunting endeavor. The red-hot Seattle economy only adds to the challenge. To the rescue:

Seattle Market Digest

The Seattle Market Digest is a monthly compilation of the ups and downs and comings and goings in greater Seattle’s retail, travel, real-estate development and housing markets, including the latest stats on labor, and how they all impact the local economy.

It’s everything you need to know in one tidy little package.

The information is curated by Steve Fuller, Seattle Times Research Analyst, from business news coverage in the Seattle Times and other highly respected local media, with a synopsis and links provided. It’s comprehensive, yet quick and easy to digest so you can influence outcomes, astound your friends and coworkers and become your company’s go-to guru on the Seattle market. Click on the link and check out the latest issue of Seattle Market Digest and while you are there, sign up for email delivery of future issues. There’s only one of you, but this will make it look like you have an army of minions! Start the new year off by making yourself smarter and more effective. It’s an opportunity you can’t afford to miss!

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Seat­tle Media Maven is open to your sug­ges­tions for con­tent and always wel­comes tips, feed­back, ques­tions – what­ever is on your mind about the Seat­tle mar­ket and the media that serve it! Use the Com­ments box below or email us at seattlemediamaven@seattletimes.com.

 

 

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Seattle’s curiosity and quirkiness highlighted in TV viewing choices http://www.seattlemediamaven.com/2015/12/16/seattle-curiosity-and-quirkiness-highlighted-in-tv-viewing-choices/ http://www.seattlemediamaven.com/2015/12/16/seattle-curiosity-and-quirkiness-highlighted-in-tv-viewing-choices/#respond Wed, 16 Dec 2015 13:06:21 +0000 http://www.seattlemediamaven.com/?p=1118 Seattle market #1 for Documentary viewing and #2 for Science-Fiction If you are what you consume, then Seattle’s TV viewing habits are totally in sync with its reputation as a well-educated and high-tech mecca. According to the most recent Nielsen Scarborough Research Study, Seattle-Tacoma ranks first among the top 15 markets in the nation for...

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Seattle market #1 for Documentary viewing and #2 for Science-Fiction
Seattle ranks behinc Houston for those who typically watch sci-fi TV programming

Seattle ranks #2 for Sci-fi TV programming viewership

If you are what you consume, then Seattle’s TV viewing habits are totally in sync with its reputation as a well-educated and high-tech mecca.

According to the most recent Nielsen Scarborough Research Study, Seattle-Tacoma ranks first among the top 15 markets in the nation for propensity to typically watch Documentaries and second for viewing Sci-fi programming. It also ranks in the top 10 for tendency to seek out Mystery/Suspense/Crime shows (3rd), Dramas (4th), Sports (5th), Reality-Talent shows (7th), Reality-Adventure shows (8th) and Comedies (8th).

We are what we watch

Our viewing and content preferences are a telling differentiator when compared to other markets. Within the Seattle-Tacoma market, documentaries only rank 3rd among total viewers who typically seek out programming, and Science Fiction ranks 8th. The national ranking is based on the percentage of the market that typically views this programming, and we simply like these formats more.
Documentaries seems a no-brainer for this liberal and highly educated core market. The correlation of sci-fi fandom with our techie population also should be of no surprise, as there is more than enough anecdotal evidence out there to support that techies rank very high among the legions of Trekkies, not to mention that techie extraordinaire, Paul Allen, dedicated an entire section of the Experience Music Project Museum to the “Infinite Worlds of Science Fiction” (and another section to the first ever Hello Kitty Exhibit, but we’ll save that for another time). The annual throng of 80,000+ cosplayers who attend the (soon-to-be) four-day Emerald City ComicCon – featuring everything from superheroes and space adventurers to steampunk devotees – add an equally interesting dimension to these results. It also may help explain the market’s high ranking for Mystery/Suspense/Crime show viewing.

Demographic profile of TV program formatsDefine and capture Seattle’s elusive audiences

As you know, content is a key driver in reaching and engaging nearly everyone these days. What they typically watch is yet another clue as to what to provide as a marketer (regardless of platform) and where to place media and promotional dollars if you want to get their attention. What’s more, exploring these channels can open doors to capturing otherwise elusive target prospects in new and creative ways.

Equally telling and, depending on your perspective, a point of pride, is the market’s cellar position in nine of the 23 programming formats. Western Washington adults are far less likely to typically get their news and information from television news or talk shows, they apparently prefer their music live, their games interactive, and they steer away from the portrayal of life’s underbelly that makes up court TV and daytime soap operas. Finally, given the geekiness of the market, dating is daunting enough without subjecting oneself to the “reality” of it all. Not pointing any fingers, but Atlanta and Miami – really?

Could it be that urbanicity skews the results? After all, top East coast markets generally are more compact than those in the West and the Seattle-Tacoma DMA comprises nearly all of Western Washington. The answer is, not really. The Seattle-Bellevue-Everett Metropolitan Division (King and Snohomish counties), which accounts for nearly 60% of the adult population and TV viewers in Western Washington, generally mirrors the DMA with one exception: While the Seattle-Tacoma DMA ranks 15th among the top 15 markets for typically watching late night talk shows (only 13% do), those at the local level are 21% more likely than the rest of the market to view this programming and account for seven in 10 of those viewers.

Does age impact Seattle’s TV programming choices?

Interestingly, the percentage of adults who typically seek out specific TV programming is fairly uniform across all age cohorts, with approximately 95% doing so. With only a couple exceptions, there also isn’t a lot of variance between the top five programming formats by age group, with Movies, Comedies, Sports, Documentaries, and Dramas topping the list in a total-viewer ranking. Not surprisingly, differences do surface when age cohorts are indexed against the total market adults. For the uninitiated, the index is a measurement of a group’s propensity to display a particular behavior. A score of 100 indicates “average” propensity, in this case, to have an affinity for a particular type of programming. Statistically, differences are significant (read: actionable) when the index is 120 or higher (it’s a defining trait) or 80 and lower (extreme aversion). To illustrate, Millennials are 73% more likely to typically seek out Music Video programming (index 173), and 53% less likely to seek out Local Evening News (index 47) when compared to total market adults.

How age impacts viewing choicesFor the most part, favored programming, as well as aversions, tend to fit with life stages: kids programming tops the list among those of child-rearing ages and is the bottom for those who aren’t. No surprise, the market’s amazement with the supernatural does not extend to religion. Its ranking as the third least religious in the nation (behind #1 Portland and #2 Tampa), seems to hold true in viewing preferences… at least until one gets old enough to begin pondering life’s end!

The table below focuses on the programming choices the market gravitates toward more than other markets and breaks out the demographic profiles at the pivotal King and Snohomish counties metropolitan market level.

Demographic profile of TV program formatsYou will note that Science Fiction aficionados are predominantly male, younger and better educated than the general market and have plenty of discretionary income. Sports enthusiasts also are male, a bit older and upscale homeowners. You’ll find predominantly female audiences watch Reality – Talent shows. They are upscale and show the highest percentage of the profiled formats to work in white-collar jobs and have children in the household – a marketer’s dream! Also upscale, family-oriented and attracting both genders are Reality – Adventure shows. Dramas attracts the highest percentage of college graduates and, with average household incomes of $93,354 is second to Science Fiction viewers in earnings. Mystery/Suspense/Crime viewers draw the oldest audiences in this group, but ones with plenty of discretionary income. Comedies attract the youngest audiences, but they are upward bound and earn well above their age cohort.

Nielsen’s PRIZM Premiere segmentation system adds yet another dimension to the audiences one attracts with these programming formats and, by extension, content topics, regardless of medium. Listed below are the top indexing segments for the market and the Seattle adults who typically view the TV formats. (Click image to enlarge).

PRIZM Segment profiles flesh out viewer behaviorsFor more information and descriptions beyond their titles, including demographics and media preferences, visit http://bit.ly/SeattleTVFormatSegments.

Remember, these are audiences that the Seattle market delivers better than most other major markets. They are the fabric of our community and there are many ways to reach them through multiple media. If you would like help in doing that, let us know.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Seat­tle Media Maven is open to your sug­ges­tions for topics/con­tent and always wel­comes tips, feed­back, ques­tions – what­ever is on your mind about the Seat­tle mar­ket and the media that serve it! Email us at seattlemediamaven@seattletimes.com. 

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Engage Baby Boomers to Boost Your Bottom Line http://www.seattlemediamaven.com/2015/03/31/engage-baby-boomers-to-boost-your-bottom-line/ http://www.seattlemediamaven.com/2015/03/31/engage-baby-boomers-to-boost-your-bottom-line/#respond Tue, 31 Mar 2015 12:06:05 +0000 http://www.seattlemediamaven.com/?p=1106 At the end of December 2014 I wrote an article on the last Baby Boomers turning 50. It documented the spending power and immense opportunity of this generation, which is largely ignored by advertisers (only 10% of marketing dollars target this demographic). A new report by the Fung Business Intelligence Centre reiterates that the Baby Boomer...

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Engaging Baby Boomers will boost your bottom line

Baby Boomers are the key to increased sales

At the end of December 2014 I wrote an article on the last Baby Boomers turning 50. It documented the spending power and immense opportunity of this generation, which is largely ignored by advertisers (only 10% of marketing dollars target this demographic).

A new report by the Fung Business Intelligence Centre reiterates that the Baby Boomer market will continue to grow for yet another 20 years. In releasing the report, FBIC Executive Director/Head of Global Retail and Research, Deborah Weinswig, noted: “Just as they have at every other stage of their lives, Boomers are now redefining what it means to be old. On the whole, they are healthier, richer and more active than previous generations of older Americans. Younger Boomers (ages 55 to 64) earn and spend more than the average U.S. consumer, and significantly more than the avidly courted Millennials.”

Baby Boomers Spend

According to the report, younger Boomers will outspend Millennials by nearly $8,000 annually and the typical U.S. consumer by $5,000 with spending occurring across most categories. They will account for more than half of all dollars spent on groceries in 2015 with a focus on health and wellness. They also will outspend Millennials on eating at home, entertainment, household furnishings, pet supplies and personal care.

Baby Boomers Are Tech-Savvy

Marketers need to get over the outdated notions that older adults are baffled by high-tech devices and shun the digital world. That is so 15 years ago! They may Baby Boomer's are technologically saavy and avid online shoppershave been late to the game, but once on board, they fully adopted the technology. In the Seattle market, nearly all Boomers (95%) own a computer and access the internet – same as the total adult market. The percentages owning smartphones and tablets also closely match. They average 8.7 hours a week on the internet, compared to 9.5 for total adults in the market. As noted in the previous Boomer post, Boomers com­prise one-third of all social-media users in the Seat­tle mar­ket, and nearly 30% of online TV and online video view­ers, mak­ing them not only a lucra­tive tar­get, but one in which reach and fre­quency are achieved rather quickly.

Behold the Baby Boomer Grandparent Market

The grandparent market is and will continue to present a huge potential for retail sales. According to the report, nationally, The grandparent market is booming and spending!grandparents will increase from 65 million in 2010 to 80 million in 2020. There currently are nearly 930,000 grandparents in the Seattle-Tacoma DMA. If they grow at the same pace as national projections, they will account for more than 214,000 market adults in less than five years!

Baby Boomers Redefine What it Means to be “Old”

Beauty/Skin care, fitness, entertainment, health-food and home furnishings and home-improvement categories present significant retail potential as Boomers align their styles with their needs. That will include downsizing moves as well as second-home purchases. Nearly 80,000 plan to sell their home in the coming year. Sixty thousand plan to buy a new home and 222,000 are second-home owners.

Bottom line: There are 1.4 million Baby Boomers in the Seattle-Tacoma market with money to spend and a desire to spend it on products and services that reward them or make their lives easier or better. Given their sheer size and economic clout, Boomers will remain the most influential and forceful consumer group for years to come. Smart marketers will embrace this untapped potential by offering fresh and imaginative product development, tailored customer services and innovative marketing strategies. In most cases, all it takes is adding a Boomer-perspective twist on an existing product or service. Are you up for the challenge…and rewards?

To learn more about the demographics, media and shopping habits of Seattle’s Baby Boomer market, check out our previous post, Youngest Baby Boomers Turn 50.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Seat­tle Media Maven is open to your sug­ges­tions for con­tent and always wel­comes tips, feed­back, ques­tions – what­ever is on your mind about the Seat­tle mar­ket and the media that serve it! Use the Com­ments box below or email us at seattlemediamaven@seattletimes.com.

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Youngest Baby Boomers Turn 50 http://www.seattlemediamaven.com/2014/12/31/youngest-baby-boomers-turn-50/ http://www.seattlemediamaven.com/2014/12/31/youngest-baby-boomers-turn-50/#respond Wed, 31 Dec 2014 18:18:10 +0000 http://www.seattlemediamaven.com/?p=1087 Baby Boomers are the new 18–49! As of 11:59pm tonight, the last of the Baby Boomers turns 50! It seems only fitting that we end 2014 with a salute to those who make up more than one-third of the adult population in the Seattle market, and nationally control approximately 80% of personal financial assets, 60%...

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Youngest baby boomers turn 50 on December 31st, 2014

Illustration by Kaitlyn Castellow

Baby Boomers are the new 18–49!

As of 11:59pm tonight, the last of the Baby Boomers turns 50! It seems only fitting that we end 2014 with a salute to those who make up more than one-third of the adult population in the Seattle market, and nationally control approximately 80% of personal financial assets, 60% of all disposable income, and account for more than half of all consumer spending.

U.S. Birthrates per 1,000 populationBorn after World War II (1946–1964), Boomers were the wealthiest, most educated, active, and most physically fit generation (remember the Kennedy Physical Fitness Challenge?) as they strode into their income earning years. They also were the first to grow up genuinely expecting the world to improve with time; something you don’t hear much about these days.
With parents who survived childhoods during the first Great Depression, the earliest Boomers were given so much more than previous generations, and then turned around and thumbed their noses at it (with the uncertainties of the Vietnam War providing strong impetus), only to return to those values as time wore on (with a few modifications). Even with all the dramatic social change, the one thing they didn’t leave behind was the appreciation of the work ethic, which has paid significant dividends.

Target the affluentials as well as the aspirational

Looking at the Nielsen Scarborough stats on the Seattle DMA, Boomers number nearly 1.4 million (and number just 183,900 more than adult Millennials), account for more than $114 billion in household income and live in homes valued at nearly $417 billion. They also account for better than 40% of all spending in a number of key categories, such as carpet and floor coverings, lawn and garden, window treatments and new car sales. They are bigger spenders on fine jewelry, cosmetics/perfumes/skincare, men’s clothing of all kinds and shoes, full-service restaurant dining, wine purchases and grocery expenditures – even with so many being empty-nesters. In fact, among measured categories, Boomers significantly outpace all other age cohorts in spending in everything but fast-food dining, athletic clothing, children’s and infants clothing, sports equipment and women’s business clothing and shoes. They are second to Millennials in the amount of time they spend on the Internet and in mobile-device usage, yet spend $84 million more on Internet purchases. They also take more domestic and foreign air trips than any other generation; nationally they account for 80% of all luxury travel expenditures.

 The best is yet to come

Given these stats, one would think they would be the darlings of advertisers, but the generation largely has been shoved to the back-burner in favor of Millennials, along with the follow-up generation of Gen-Xers (ages 35–49). One recent study found that advertisers spend 10 times as much targeting 18–34 year old Millennials as they do on ages 50–65. Interesting, since Millennials and Boomers have a lot in common, and in many cases, they’re still occupying the same household! To illustrate, nine of the top 10 websites visited by Millennials are also in the top 10 for Boomers, and they share 15 of the top 20.

Boomers and Millennials visit the same websitesMore important, Boomers consume huge amounts of both traditional and digital media, including more time-shifted television than their Millennial counterparts. They also comprise one-third of all social-media users in the Seattle market, and nearly 30% of online TV and online video viewers, making them not only a lucrative target, but one in which reach and frequency are achieved rather quickly. Finally, according to a 2012 study from Nielsen and Boomager LLC, the 50-plus segment will grow 34 percent over the next 16 years, compared to 12 percent growth for those ages 18–49.

They grow up so fast!

And really, isn’t it time to rethink the 18–49 targeting category? After all, it was created more than 40 years ago specifically to target the Boomer generation due to its market influence! That influence hasn’t waned; there is ample evidence that Boomers intend to continue consuming and doing interesting and rewarding things that cost money until the day they die. If actuarial stats prevail, they’ve got another 30 years ahead of them and they have both the desire and the discretionary income to make those years, and especially retirement, count. What’s more, it is estimated Boomers are set to inherit $15 trillion over the next 20 years. And let’s not forget, they not only buy for themselves, but also for their children, many of whom are Millennials, grandchildren and in some cases, great-grand children. Yet media buyers, especially those focused on upfront TV, just can’t manage to see audiences in the new ways they dictate… or the age cohort they have grown into!

Times are a’changing… and the Boomers with them

There seems to be a misconception that Boomers are stuck in their ways and won’t change brands, but multiple studies indicate they are just as likely to switch brands and experiment with new products as their younger cohorts. They’ve been around and they have been targeted all their (18–49) lives; they are savvy and discriminating consumers, and they are not afraid to change brands for a better product or service.

While there is no argument that Millennials are the first to adopt new technologies, once they go mainstream, Boomers are quick to climb on board and actually account for the greatest expenditures and growth. Learning and experiencing is the hallmark of the generation, so technology isn’t a stretch for Boomers. Most of it has been developed during the course of their careers; they are comfortable with it as a tool and they are embracing it as a form of entertainment, plus they have the income to invest in it. And, as noted before, in many cases they are purchasing the technology their at-home Millennial children are using, so the awareness naturally crosses over. As long as this trend continues, they’ll also adapt to new products.

Opportunity knocks: embrace the Boomers

With all the focus on micro-targeting and the ease of programmatic buying, can we expect a rash of advertisers will step back from the detail and see the forest from the trees? It comes down to one simple question: Who are the purchasers of your product? It’s not a matter of one target over another, young vs mature, but developing new consumers while tapping into the most lucrative ones. With the dynamics of both generations changing, aging, developing and adopting new technologies, advertising approaches in reaching these audiences should be equally dynamic, starting with the media used to reach them. If you are ready to embrace your best customers, here are the Seattle market media that resonate most with them:

Seattle media that resonate with Baby Boomers

Top 15 vehicles by medium for reaching Seattle Baby Boomers

Happy Birthday to the last of the Baby Boomers, and to all a Happy and Prosperous New Year!

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Seat­tle Media Maven is open to your sug­ges­tions for con­tent and always wel­comes tips, feed­back, ques­tions – what­ever is on your mind about the Seat­tle mar­ket and the media that serve it! Use the Com­ments box below or email us at seattlemediamaven@seattletimes.com.

 

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Holiday Favorite Clydesdales Put Out to Pasture as Budweiser Taps Younger Market http://www.seattlemediamaven.com/2014/12/02/holiday-favorite-clydesdales-put-out-to-pasture-as-budweiser-taps-younger-market/ http://www.seattlemediamaven.com/2014/12/02/holiday-favorite-clydesdales-put-out-to-pasture-as-budweiser-taps-younger-market/#respond Tue, 02 Dec 2014 13:06:06 +0000 http://www.seattlemediamaven.com/?p=1052 All tapped out Budweiser is losing its market share among 21–27-year-old Millennials and its place on bar-tap line up to craft brews in many markets. According to a recent Wall Street Journal article, some 44% of these coveted drinkers have never tried Budweiser. Bud Light took the top tap in Anheuser-Busch InBev NV’s product line-up...

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Budweiser is replacing iconic Clydesdales with Zombies, Jay Z and Electronic Dance Music

All tapped out

Budweiser is losing its market share among 21–27-year-old Millennials and its place on bar-tap line up to craft brews in many markets. According to a recent Wall Street Journal article, some 44% of these coveted drinkers have never tried Budweiser. Bud Light took the top tap in Anheuser-Busch InBev NV’s product line-up in 2001, and Coors Light bumped regular Bud to #3 in 2011. In an attempt to win back favor, it’s going so far as to do away with the universally beloved Clydesdale commercials this holiday season and focus entirely on this young demo with the ubiquitous social “friends and sharing” approach. Holiday spots will feature 20-somethings looking into the camera and answering the question, “If you could grab a Bud with any of your friends these holidays, who would it be?” This move also includes a reduced presence in Major League Baseball and NASCAR sponsorships in favor of food festivals, the impetus coming from internal research that indicates half of 21–27-year-olds claim to be “foodies.” Also on the events docket are an expanding sponsorship of college town parties around the Made in America Festival it started in 2012 with Jay Z, and raves with the electronic-dance music DJ group Cash Cash.

In addition to the outcry about the future care and feeding of the Clydesdale team (never fear, they will be included in other marketing efforts) and the impact of the termination of the emotionally charged commercials on the tissue industry, A‑B realizes it also may alienate its core drinker audience (ages 28–34) with this move. Nevertheless, they claim even their core-drinker consumption is expected to decline as they settle into the economically delayed responsibilities of adulthood. A‑B claims it is taking the long view: according to the National Beer Wholesalers Association, those turning 21 peaked in 2013 and represent the largest number of new drinkers since the Baby Boom generation started filling bar seats. Its research indicates that craft brews currently make up 15% of 20-somethings out-of-home purchases, compared to 10% for more mature drinkers. (You will see in the table below those statistics are amplified in Seattle.) In addition to craft beers, other beverages such as hard cider, flavored malt beverages and read-to-drink cocktails are chipping away at Budweiser’s market share.

The King of Beers is jostling with a very full court

Alcoholic beverages consumed by Seattle beer drinkers -- total and ages 21-29That drastic of a target-audience switch may not play well in all markets. Among beer drinkers in the Seattle market, domestic beer still reigns king (60%), followed by imported beers (48%), microbrews/craft beers (38%), light beer (37%) and hard cider (17%). Domestic regular beer ranks even higher with those ages 21–29 at 67%, followed by import beers.

Blue Moon shines brightest among favored brands (17%); Budweiser ranks 9th with 8% market share among beer drinkers and trails other A‑B brands Bud Light (16%) and Coors Light (12%). Only 23% of all beer drinkers consume their favorite beverage in a bar or nightclub where the Bud taps are disappearing. For those ages 21–29, nearly half consume their beer in bars and nightclubs. Budweiser drops to 18th in this demographic, and it has lost more than 40% of its drinkers in this age group over the past five years, so A‑B’s concern is legitimate. Still, stabling the Clydesdale team?! Maybe the better strategy would be to get more (Budweiser) beer drinkers of all ages out to bars and nightclubs before they focus on their beverage of choice!

Beer brands consumed by Seattle beer drinkers -- total and ages 21-29It’s more about taste buds than buddies

More than losing market share to light or craft beers, or even the nascent hard cider movement, is the growing consumption of hard liquor among beer drinkers of all ages. In the past 30 days, half of all Seattle beer drinkers have consumed white goods (gin, vodka, rum, tequila, etc.) and one-third have consumed whiskey. Of those in A‑B’s target demo (ages 21–29), 65% have consumed white goods and 45% have consumed whiskey. Whiskey and hard cider share of market has nearly doubled with this group over the past five years. Malt beverages and pre-mixed cocktails are barely on their radar. Surely hard-liquor and cider drinkers still appreciate a Clydesdale moment!

 

 

 

 

 

Alcoholic-beverage consumption trend in the Seattle market

Click on image to enlarge

Will the walking dead bring life to the Budweiser brand?

In the WSJ article, a former A‑B senior marketing executive expresses concern about the marketing about-face. He thinks the new approach will alienate core drinkers to the point that they will say, “That’s not my Budweiser anymore.” And I tend to agree. In maker-movement centric Seattle, from brews to distilleries, nearly eight in 10 Seattle Bud drinkers are male. Four in 10 are ages 50–69, but the next highest consumer-age segment is ages 18–34 (at 29%, with 16% ages 21–29), so the current messaging isn’t totally lost on the younger demos. Eight in 10 haven’t graduated from college and fewer than one in 10 currently is a student. Slightly more than half are unemployed (including retirees). Does that sound like a complementary Foodie profile to you? And by going in this direction, isn’t Bud taking on yet another competitor in wine?

Budweiser’s website claims the Clydesdales, which have been a hallmark of the brand since 1933, “are the living embodiment of America’s great industrial spirit.” That spirit has been missing from most Millennials’ life experience, so maybe it is time to move on to zombie realities. Yet, I can’t help but feel this marketing move is changing horses midstream, and we all know how that turns out.

Seattle data source: 2014 Nielsen Scar­bor­ough Report, Release 2

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Seat­tle Media Maven is open to your sug­ges­tions for con­tent and always wel­comes tips, feed­back, ques­tions – what­ever is on your mind about the Seat­tle mar­ket and the media that serve it! Use the Com­ments box below or email us at seattlemediamaven@seattletimes.com.

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Top 10 Media for Reaching Seattle’s Registered Voters http://www.seattlemediamaven.com/2014/09/09/media-preferences-of-seattles-registered-voters/ http://www.seattlemediamaven.com/2014/09/09/media-preferences-of-seattles-registered-voters/#respond Tue, 09 Sep 2014 12:06:20 +0000 http://www.seattlemediamaven.com/?p=1017 Seems quite a few of the market’s registered voters forgot to show up at the polls for the primary. That leaves a number of races in a dead heat. If you are tasked at getting the word out to voters about your candidate or initiative, or just curious how political leaning translates to media preferences,...

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Seems quite a few of the market’s registered voters forgot to show up at the polls for the primary. That leaves a number of races in a dead heat. If you are tasked at getting the word out to voters about your candidate or initiative, or just curious how political leaning translates to media preferences, check out these findings.

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Top 10 media ranker for reach and targeting Seattle-Tacoma registered voters

Top 10 media ranker for reach and targeting Seattle-Tacoma registered voters

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Seattle Media Spotlight: Classic Rock KZOK-FM http://www.seattlemediamaven.com/2014/07/29/reeling-years-classic-rock-seattle/ http://www.seattlemediamaven.com/2014/07/29/reeling-years-classic-rock-seattle/#respond Tue, 29 Jul 2014 12:06:23 +0000 http://www.seattlemediamaven.com/?p=982 Reeling in the Years: Classic Rock and Seattle A life well-lived is a constant stream of “firsts,” some welcome and exhilarating, and some not so welcome and disquieting. The latter includes the first time the music of your youth is referred to as “classic rock.” Want your mind blown? The baby on the album cover...

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Seattle Classic Rock favorite Jimi Hendrix

Reeling in the Years: Classic Rock and Seattle

A life well-lived is a constant stream of “firsts,” some welcome and exhilarating, and some not so welcome and disquieting. The latter includes the first time the music of your youth is referred to as “classic rock.” Want your mind blown? The baby on the album cover of Nirvana’s “Nevermind” has graduated from college. In a recent series of posts, the data-based FiveThirtyEight blog attempts to define the Classic Rock format, takes a deep dive into “why classic rock isn’t what it used to be,” and examines the role technology plays on playlist selection.

Some key findings include:

  • If you have to put a timeline on it, it was the mid-‘60s through the mid-80s plus a trickling into the mid-90s (median year: 1977), with the decade between 1973 and 1982 producing 57 percent of the genre’s songs
  • The peak year was 1973, a very big year, with the release of Pink Floyd’s seminal “Dark Side of the Moon,” Led Zeppelin’s “Houses of the Holy,” Elton John’s “Goodbye Yellow Brick Road,” Bruce Springsteen’s “Greetings from Asbury Park, NJ” and two from Paul McCartney and Wings: “Red Rose Speedway” and “Band on the Run.” A second peak hit in 1991 with the releases of “Nevermind” by Nirvana, Metallica’s eponymous album and U2’s “Achtung Baby.”

In author Walt Hickey’s week of listening to the format on Classic Rock stations across the nation, Aerosmith landed in the top two spots of the top 25 most-frequently-played songs list with “Dream On” and “Sweet Emotion,” followed by Seattle’s own Jimi Hendrix with “All Along the Watchtower.” Heart is the only other home-grown band to make the top-25 list, coming in 8th and 14th with “Crazy on You” and “Magic Man,” respectively. It’s a stretch, but I think we also can lay claim to the Steve Miller Band’s “The Joker,” ranked 15th, since Steve made his home here for many years. (You can listen to FiveThirtyEight’s top Classic Rock songs on Spotify.) In other findings:

  • An elite core of Classic Rock artists – Led Zeppelin, Van Halen and the Rolling Stones – make up 50 percent of all the songs played. The remaining top 10 artists include:
    1. Pink Floyd
    2. Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers
    3. AC/DC
    4. Aerosmith
    5. ZZ Top
    6. The Beatles
    7. Queen

The Steve Miller Band comes in at #18 and Heart just makes the cut at #25.

In his data analysis, Hickey discovered that the genre isn’t only restricted to a certain era, but also is defined by the regional tastes. Seattle and Seattle’s Classic Rock station KZOK-FM (102.5) were included in his research, which uncovers some interesting local notes:

  • The Who apparently is Seattle’s favorite Classic Rock band, capturing 4% of all plays, compared to 1.7 percent among the other top 30 markets included in the research
  • YES gets played 3.5 times more often in Seattle than is typical for the other markets
  • Our market’s grunge-band contributions to Classic Rock – Pearl Jam and Nirvana – are played most often (compared to average) in Los Angeles and San Francisco, respectively. And our Heart belongs to Houston.
  • Portland likes Steppenwolf. ‘Nuff said.

Also noted in the article is the ever-changing definition of what constitutes Classic Rock. Boomers and Gen-Xers (now ages 38–68, though the format targets ages 30–49) have owned this format for decades. But what will happen in the next decade as these groups roll out of the key advertising demographic? Will advertisers follow them? In the “that’s‑so-yesterday” Millennial world, will today’s tunes be accelerated to Classic Rock way before their time? Hickey was shocked to hear Green Day’s “American Idiot” (rel. 2004) on one station and wonders, “Should I steel myself for One Direction’s eventual air time on Classic Rock?”

It’s Still Rock and Roll

Seattle’s Classic Rock station KZOK-FM is owned by CBS Radio along with sister stations KJAQ-FM (Adult Hits 96.5), Sports Talk KFNQ-AM (1090) and Country KMPS-FM (94.1). It is one of two Classic Rock stations in the Seattle-Tacoma market, the other being KISM-FM out of Bellingham. With more than 555,000 weekly listeners, it ranks 7th among 48 measured market stations for weekly reach and accounts for 88 percent of all Classic Rock listeners in the market. While it claims to be “Seattle’s Only Classic Rock Station” that title lies more in name than in a unique format or playlist. In addition to Classic Rock enthusiasts, KZOK-FM attracts 30% or more of each of the weekly listeners of Oldies stations KJR-FM (95.7) and KMCQ-FM (104.5), Active Rock stations KISW-FM (99.9) and KKBW-FM (104.9), Hot AC KHTP-FM (103.7), as well as from sister stations KJAQ-FM and KFNQ-AM. It also shares a goodly amount of its listeners with AC stations KRWM-FM and KPLZ-FM.

Classic Rock KZOK-FM Morning Show hosts Danny and SarahKZOK’s advertised differentiator is “deeper album cuts,” focusing on the edgier bands and artists that usually are not played on oldies stations, presented by some strong, acquired-taste personalities including Danny Bonaduce and Sarah, Nate Connor, and “Crazy Mama” Stacy Ireland, as well as veteran Seattle DJs Gary Crow and Mike West (Breakfast with the Beatles).

A recent listen of KZOK programming produced a typical Classic Rock artist playlist:

Typical Classic Rock KZOK artist playlist

 

Smokin’ in the Boys Room

Nationally, Classic Rock listeners tend to skew male (65%), ages 35–69 (77%), have household incomes of $50,000 or more (67%), and are 38% more likely to be occupied in blue-collar occupations (27%) than are general market adults.

As noted in the FiveThirtyEight article, there can be significant regional differences and listener preferences that influence each market’s playlist. Seattle’s Classic Rock KZOK-FM definitely reflects the west coast music aesthetic but also favors the 60s a bit more than other-market stations. Like the format’s national listeners, KZOK-FM also skews male (63%), but nearly half of its listeners are ages 50–69; average age is 47.5. They also are:

  • wealthier than other market CR listeners, with half earning incomes of $75,000 or more (median household income $74,556)
  • better educated (30% with college degrees)
  • occupied slightly more in white collar jobs, at 43%, and under-represent the market’s blue-collar workers (23%) compared to the make-up of national Classic Rock listeners. Four in 10 have attended voc/tech schools. KZOK’s female listeners are more than twice as likely to be stay-at-home moms. And there is a fair representation among current and former military.
  • more likely to be small-business owners or work from home (most of the time or always) than general market adults
  • passing their love of Classic Rock onto their Millennial children – one in 10 listeners is a college or university student

Three out of four KZOK listeners own their own home, with an average market value of $373,647. Sixty-three percent reside in King or Snohomish counties, with another 20percent living in Pierce County. They show a propensity to live in suburban and rural pockets of the counties – Arlington, south Everett, Maltby, Lynnwood and Mountlake Terrace in Snohomish County; Tacoma, Puyallup, Roy and Gig Harbor in Pierce County, and in south King County (Kent, Renton, Auburn, Ravensdale, Des Moines and Federal Way) – and are far less likely to live in the Seattle city limits.

Like a Rolling Stone

KZOK’s audience churn is exceptionally high, making it challenging to reach and build frequency among its listeners. With an AQH core adult audience of 15,000, KZOK obviously is more a favored 2nd or 3rd (or lower) button on the radio pre-set. In fact, it disproportionately shares its audience with more than 25 other market stations! One would have to secure ~55 spots per week to hit just a frequency of three against its audience of ages 30–69, and more than 240 over the course of a month (much to the chagrin of the core listeners) for an advertiser to manage just a sustaining schedule.

Since KZOK shares a high proportion of its audience with other radio stations, not to mention other media, it definitely needs to be matched with a strong audience anchor medium when developing a campaign. Top candidates include the Sunday Seattle Times, KING-TV weekends and prime-time, and KIRO-TV weekends.

The same stations that fight for KZOK’s audience attention also vie for its ad dollars. In addition to those mentioned previously, KZOK is knocking on the same doors as sales reps from Contemporary Hits stations KBKS-FM and KUBE-FM, SportsTalk KJR-AM and Country KKWF-FM  in pushing its predominantly male listeners. The most active advertiser on KZOK-FM is the Shane Company, averaging 269 spots per month. As noted in a previous post on the Active Rock station KISW-FM, targeting predominantly male audiences makes sense for the Shane Company. Classic Rock KZOK men buy fine jewelryIn addition to still being in the couple forming (and reforming) years, listeners also are at the intersection of multiple mid-life events – relationship renewal, graduations, weddings… or crisis. While nearly 60% are married, 14 percent are legally separated or divorced making them 49 percent more likely to be so than is true for the rest of the market’s adult population. Whatever reason, KZOK-FM listeners are 32percent more likely to shop for fine jewelry and 27 percent more likely to spend more than $500 on it than is true of the general market.

According to Media Monitors, KZOK’s radio property pulled in $6.3 million in ad spending for the first six months of the year. It benefits immensely from the CBS Radio affiliation and its four-station family in attracting national spot revenue; only 17 percent of its advertisers and 13 percent of KZOK’s ad revenue comes from local accounts. The top 10 most active LOCAL advertisers over the first six months of the year include:

  1. FIAT Of Tacoma
  2. Innovative Men’s Clinic
  3. Washington Gold
  4. Bellevue Rare Coins/ West Seattle Rare Coins
  5. Quil Ceda Creek Casino
  6. Sound Credit Union
  7. Seattle Parks & Recreation
  8. Michael’s Toyota Scion Of Bellevue
  9. Sound Ford
  10. Via Vascular

Ten categories make up almost half of KZOK’s spot revenue. Not surprisingly, Auto Parts/Services & Towing tops the list for all advertisers. Local Car Dealers account for 15 percent of all local ad revenue, followed by Casinos & Gambling (13%) and Diagnostic & Medical Services (11%):

  1. Auto Parts, Services & Towing
  2. Insurance Providers
  3. Cars & Trucks, Local Dealers
  4. Wireless Carrier
  5. Casinos & Gambling
  6. Quick Service Restaurants
  7. Banks-Credit Unions-Mortgage-Finance Svc
  8. Cars & Trucks, Dealer Association
  9. Live Theater, Opera, Music, Dance
  10. Telecom Bundled Services

The Sweet Mid-Life: Women and Children First

Classic Rock Boomer and Xer parents with teenager

What sets KZOK’s Gen‑X and Boomer listeners apart is that they are members of established families and early empty-nesters – in other words, those who are in their highest consuming years. The station’s listeners show high concentrations in three PRIZM lifestage groups:

Accumulated Wealth, Affluent Empty Nests and Young Accumulators. All three of these groups are among the top 10 most-affluent lifestage groups. The Accumulated Wealth group includes the wealthiest families, mostly college educated, white-collar Boomers; Young Accumulators, as the name suggests, are a slightly younger and more ethnically diverse Gen‑X version of the former group who, at this stage in life, are fully invested in their children. Affluent Empty Nests, with their children out of the home, have plenty of disposable cash to finance active lifestyles that are rich in travel and entertainment events. They also are politically savvy, donate to political causes and are highly engaged with their communities.

PRIZM’s secondary classification is based on affluence and urbanization (city, suburbs, second city or town/rural) categories. KZOK listeners are well represented among PRIZM’s Elite Suburbs, Second-City Society (think Issaquah and Redmond), and in the Landed Gentry social groups.

Nearly six in 10 listeners are parents or grandparents of children under the age of 18. They are 22 percent more likely to have a teenager in the house, and on the other end of the spectrum, they are 22 percent more likely to be part of the sandwiched generation that also is caring for or monitoring an elderly parent. More than half are employed full-time, which includes a high representation in the construction and production trades as well as small-business ownership and self-employment. They are among the minority of their generations who actually planned ahead; they are paying off their mortgages and are 56 percent more likely to be contemplating early retirement or simply retiring in the coming year. It’s not going to be a kick-back retirement either.

A Rolling Stone Gathers No Moss

Classic Rock perennial favorites The Rolling StonesLifetime learners and re-inventors, more than one in 10 is planning to return to school for a degree or certification. Staying active is a priority. They are 17 percent more likely than general market adults to belong to a health/fitness club or gym and they show a high propensity to play tennis, basketball, softball/baseball, golf, hike, bike, run marathons and boat. They own boats, ATVs, snowmobiles and second homes and guard their assets with home security systems. The Seattle Seahawks, University of Washington Huskies and Seattle Mariners are their favorite teams. If Chris Hansen manages to bring an NHL Hockey team to town, they’ll be first in line to buy tickets. They love their music and are 49 percent more likely to attend a Rock Concert than is true of the general population and also far more likely to attend any kind of music concert. They are active in their children’s lives and attend their high school sports events. Attending the Washington State Fair is an annual outing. Add to that an interesting factoid – they also love visiting the animals in the zoo – any zoo – but especially Point Defiance Zoo and the Woodland Park Zoo. They are not gamblers; they go to casinos primarily to watch stage shows or concerts and favor Emerald Queen Casino when they do. Perhaps surprisingly, given their upscale incomes and social wherewithal, you won’t find them attending live theater events, dance or ballet performances, museums or visiting farmers markets. Their entertainment lies clearly around sports, music, and family- and friends activities.

Least Conspicuous Consumption

Given the degree of disposable income, with few exceptions, KZOK’s predominantly male listeners index average to low for consumption of goods and services. I think it is safe to say they are not the primary purchasers for their households. Remarkably, they stand out in few shopping categories or consumer activities, looking more main-stream than their demographics indicate. Part of this is due to the fact that KZOK is one of many stations its fans listen to, thus diluting any exceptional behavior. That said, there are a few areas where their consumption exceeds the norm.

They dine at all types of restaurants, but show a preference for pizza or Mexican food. Not surprising based on their spectator-sports interests, they are above-average consumers of pretzels, chips and popcorn, as well as salsa. Classic Rock KZOK listeners consume a lot of snacksIn addition to the jewelry shopping noted previously, their shopping tends to be focused around home improvement and garden stores (McLendon Hardware, Sears, Molbak’s and Swanson’s nurseries, and Lowe’s index high) and sporting goods stores (Big 5 and Cabela’s). For everything else, Costco, Fred Meyer, Walmart and hometown favorite Bartell Drug Store, in particular, cover their needs.

It should be no surprise that they also see value in owning the classics and still purchase CDs and rent/buy videos from the brick-and-mortar stores. That said, they also appreciate the convenience and selection of shopping at Amazon. Perhaps as small-business owners and telecommuters, and also as parents of students, they show a greater propensity to shop Office Supplies and Services stores than is true of the general market, especially Staples, Costco and OfficeMax.

On the Road, Again

When they are in the market for a new vehicle, they go through a dealership, but they do their research online. Four in 10 are willing to drive 20 or more miles to purchase a vehicle.

Travel preferences tend to be regional and likely tied to family. Palm Springs, Napa/Sonoma, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, the Oregon Coast, Phoenix and Alaska (possibly for the fishing?) also are favorite destinations. They are above-average for travel to Europe and Central/South America, Hawaii and the Caribbean. They are 38% more likely to stay at upscale hotels and above-average for staying at bed & breakfast accommodations.

For the Love of Money

KZOK listeners are the exception to the characteristically non-saving Boomer and resource-scarce Gen‑X profiles. They have solid pensions (think Boeing workers), 401K plans and 529 plans/college savings plans, have vacation homes and are above-average investors. Family security is important; they are 23 percent more likely to have life insurance than the general population. Cash, not credit, is king in their households. It appears they rarely go out on a limb for a loan, except for their home or to make home improvements.

Media Preferences

Classic Rock listeners tend to be fans of nearly every kind of music, which makes it difficult for the station to hold onto listeners during ad breaks. In fact, KZOK listeners also are heavy listeners of 16 other formats in the market, and all the stations that comprise them. Typically, they average about 16 hours of radio listening each week – nearly twice the amount of other market adults.

The only other medium that really resonates with them is direct mail; they are 45 percent more likely to make a purchase based on direct mail received in the home than is true of the rest of the market. Due to their active lifestyles, listeners also are somewhat more likely to be exposed to outdoor media.

Classic Rock KZOK listeners are huge spectator sports fansAs television viewers, they are typical, averaging 22 hours/week, with viewing concentrated on weekends. They prefer cable over broadcast TV and anything around football (home teams or not), the U.S. and British Opens and Ryder Cup golf tourneys, the Tour de France, and the Daytona and Indianapolis 500 races are appointment viewing. They also are big fans of viewing hockey and minor-league baseball games and are 62 percent more likely to watch sports fishing shows than the general market. In addition to sports, reality adventure shows and science-fiction programming get their attention. They are fans of pay-per-view events and video on-demand (VOD) and use it for all kinds of programming, including for automobile and real-estate information, but particularly for pay and free movies, sports, TV shows and children’s programming.

They are average newspaper readers and show a preference for the Sunday Seattle Times, as well as the Sunday editions of the Everett Herald and Tacoma News Tribune in their respective markets. The papers’ websites – seattletimes.com, heraldnet.com and newstribune.com – are the source of their news and entertainment updates, along with seattlepi.com.

While connected, KZOK listeners spend less than an hour a day online. Favored online activities include:

  • buying sporting events tickets and apparel, for which they are willing to pay top price
  • keeping up with national and local news (favoring FOXNews and newspaper websites)
  • checking sports, traffic and weather updates
  • accessing financial and medical information and services
  • researching automobile information and possibly even purchasing a vehicle

They rarely/never use the Yellow Pages.

Finally, KZOK listeners like to go out to the movies and attend new movies within two weeks of opening weekend.

Rockin’ the Right

In total numbers, KZOK listeners are fairly evenly split between those who claim affiliation with the Democrat and Republican parties, but are under-represented in both parties. Four in 10 claim to be Independent voters. Among that group, they lean markedly to the Republican side in a traditional values/government skepticism/fiscally conservative kind of way. They financially support political causes (along with military/veterans, social care/welfare, and their alma mater), and vote regularly.

Rock-and-Roll conservative, you gasp? Indeed, many of the songs that get a regular spin on Classic Rock stations, whether intended or not, are the stuff that the conservative movement is made of:

  • Won’t Get Fooled Again – The Who
  • Taxman and Revolution – The Beatles
  • Sympathy for the Devil – The Rolling Stones
  • Sweet Home Alabama – Lynyrd Skynyrd
  • Bodies – The Sex Pistols
  • Don’t Tread on Me – Metallica
  • 20th Century Man – and many more by The Kinks
  • The Trees – Rush
  • Get Over It – The Eagles

Rock on!

Data source: 2014 Nielsen Scar­bor­ough Report, Release 1

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Seat­tle Media Maven is open to your sug­ges­tions for con­tent and always wel­comes tips, feed­back, ques­tions – what­ever is on your mind about the Seat­tle mar­ket and the media that serve it! Use the Com­ments box below or email us at seattlemediamaven@seattletimes.com.

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Seattle Media Economy Starts Year Strong http://www.seattlemediamaven.com/2014/06/26/seattle-media-start-2014-strong/ http://www.seattlemediamaven.com/2014/06/26/seattle-media-start-2014-strong/#respond Thu, 26 Jun 2014 12:06:25 +0000 http://www.seattlemediamaven.com/?p=959 2013 was a year media companies were happy to have behind them. Fitful at best, most saw their revenues stall or decline. It was particularly so with Seattle media; by year end, ad spending was off 5.8% from 2012 with the most significant losses in, of all media, local spot television. One could almost hear...

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Q1 Seattle Media Ad Spend

2013 was a year media companies were happy to have behind them. Fitful at best, most saw their revenues stall or decline. It was particularly so with Seattle media; by year end, ad spending was off 5.8% from 2012 with the most significant losses in, of all media, local spot television.
One could almost hear the collective sigh when 2014 Q1 national numbers were released by Kantar Media Intelligence; U.S. ad spending was up a noteworthy 5.7%, reflecting a strong quarter for sports advertising, early election dollars and a jump in TV ad pricing. Even if you remove the boost to (mostly) television from the Sochi Winter Olympics, and the accelerating pace of digital spending fueled by mobile and video, the national results are in the positive column. Still, no one is jumping on the rosy media-future bandwagon just yet; most feel the U.S. economy still is on a slow recovery path that will continue through the remainder of the year.

What’s Up In Seattle?

Q1 2008 - 2014 Seattle Ad Spending TrendKantar-measured* major media in Seattle saw a Q1 spend uptick of 3.9% year-over-year, boosted in no small part by the Seahawks run to the Super Bowl. While behind national trends, no hand wringing is necessary quite yet; Seattle’s economy fared better than the nation’s during the recession and therefore doesn’t have as far to climb back. But the market’s still missing more than 30% from pre-recession Q1 figures, with only a fraction of that migrating to newer digital media, so you can see why the party hats remain in storage.

Seattle Online Display Advertising Spend
Continues at Record Pace

Despite the clangor of the death knell in the industry press, online display advertising remains strong in the market. In fact, according to Borrell and Associates, investment in display online here outpaces the nation by more than 10 percentage points. No surprise then that Seattle display ad spending on media websites for the first quarter soared 55%, hitting a record high for a first quarter. Still a small piece of the total media pie, that follows a 63% growth pace set for the full year 2013. Kantar attributes much of the digital gains to increases in Insurance and Real Estate advertising.
While ad-network, search, social, mobile and video spend are not included in these figures, the considerable interest and investment in those channels, especially the last two as noted in our recent post, certainly will add fuel to the digital pace this year. (insert device graphic) With desk- and laptop computer penetration at near saturation in the market, and smartphone and tablet ownership headed in the same direction, digital obviously has made the full migration from “new” media for the technologically savvy to a mainstream “traditional” media channel and lifestyle choice.

TV Still Tops

After a lackluster 2013, Seattle broadcast TV also outpaced the national gains with a 12.8% lift, driven mostly by Life and Medical Insurance, Telecom, and Cable and Satellite Provider advertising. With the exception of a few strong performers, other media were off pace YOY. Local radio bucked the 4.7% national slide, declining only 1.7%, and Outdoor, which was up nationally, was off 3.8%. Local magazines and weekly newspapers took the biggest hit, with spending down 20.4% and 17.5% respectively. The Seattle Times was up 3.7% but losses at the other regional daily newspapers resulted in a combined decline of 4.2% for the quarter.

 The Seattle Media Pie

Seattle Q1 Ad Spend by MediumAs noted, Kantar Media Intelligence measures ad spend in the major media companies in the market and the display advertising on their websites. This includes seven broadcast TV stations, three daily newspapers, 20 weekly newspapers, 26 radio stations, four local magazines, the display advertising of 30 media websites and local out-of-home media. Local cable TV is not measured by Kantar due to digital fragmentation — with more than 20 zone options — and the difficulty in obtaining accurate data. Neither is cinema, direct mail, directories or telemarketing, which collectively account for less than 20% of total ad spend. Also missing is social-media ad spending. Social, once the source of traditional media and website advertising losses, is seeing some defection of its own from marketers who used it as a sales-generating medium. Recent studies by Gallup and Nielsen have found a significant majority of people saying that social-media platforms like Facebook and Twitter have little influence on purchasing decisions.
Traditional advertising platforms (including digital display), therefore, remain the primary workhorses for the delivery of marketing messages thanks to their ability to reach the masses and influence positive business outcomes. Even with the multitude and ever-changing landscape of media placement options, in Seattle, television, daily newspapers and radio companies and their websites attract the lion’s share of measured ad dollars.

The Seattle Times Dominates

Daily newspapers and their online properties garnered 27% of ad spend and The Seattle Times remains the overall media leader for total ad-dollar investment, pulling in 83% of the spend for the three measured metro dailies, and 22% of measured ad spend overall.

Q1 2014 media group ad spend share

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Will the media investment uptick hold? So far, Q2 appears to be trending up year-over-year but many challenges remain as marketers continue to experiment in an effort to influence the bottom line. Healthy again or not, indications are that media life will be anything but business as usual.
What do you think? Are Q1 results a healthy bump or are you ready to declare that the media economy is well again?


 * Kantar Media Intelligence measures the major media properties in the greater Seattle market that account for the bulk of ad spending and provides total-spending estimates based on media rate cards with adjustments for market factors. All data should therefore be used directionally.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

We are eager to pro­vide you with the knowl­edge and tools you need to nav­i­gate the Seat­tle media mar­ket. If you have any ques­tions, we encour­age you to reach out; we’ve got answers! Con­tact us at seattlemediamaven@seattletimes.com

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Is Video Advertising the Key to Engagement? http://www.seattlemediamaven.com/2014/05/02/ready-video-advertising/ http://www.seattlemediamaven.com/2014/05/02/ready-video-advertising/#respond Fri, 02 May 2014 12:06:07 +0000 http://www.seattlemediamaven.com/?p=923 In a near perfect merging of polar opposites, video and statistics, Shutterstock, with data partner comScore and others, has created a video infographic called “Show Me Something” that highlights the exponential growth and engagement power of online video. Take a minute to watch the video; it’s a compelling story based mostly on comScore’s Video Metrix product and...

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Video and mobile advertisingIn a near perfect merging of polar opposites, video and statistics, Shutterstock, with data partner comScore and others, has created a video infographic called “Show Me Something” that highlights the exponential growth and engagement power of online video.

Take a minute to watch the video; it’s a compelling story based mostly on comScore’s Video Metrix product and includes some eye-popping statistics on U.S. online video numbers for just the month of January of this year.

Video ads now account for nearly 40% of video viewingFor example, the data state that 190 million Americans (61% of the total population and 85% of online users) watched an average of 397 online videos in the month of January – approximately 13 each day.  Thirty-six percent of those videos (or about 143 per person) were advertisements (often a forced view to get to the content you want) – up from 15% in 2011. (Note: the March 2014 comScore data indicate that video ads accounted for 38.1% of all videos viewed and 5.1% of all minutes spent viewing video online.)

Given that surge, it might come as no surprise that video ads are the fastest-growing segment of advertising on the Web. Video-ad spending doubled from 2011 to 2013 in the U.S. and is expected to grow 41% to $5.7 billion this year, according to the report, and $8 billion by 2016. That number is tempered considerably in the current Interactive Advertising Bureau (IAB) report  that claims online video advertising hit only $2.8 billion in 2013 (versus the $4.1 billion in the Shutterstock video) – up only 19% compared with $2.3 billion in 2012. It’s still significant growth, with huge implications for the digital- advertising industry, and places video advertising as the fourth largest online advertising format behind mobile.

TV Budgets Under Attack

In typical overstatement that now plays as conventional wisdom, it is speculated that many of those dollars will come from print media as well as online display, but TV budgets aren’t exempt and actually are the primary target. Both YouTube and Facebook are aggressively going after TV budgets, with Google seeking commitments in key content channels such as Beauty & Fashion, Comedy, Food and Drink, and Sports and Music, by offering audience guarantees and upfront buys – just like the TV networks. The pitch: TV ratings continue to decline and Web video reaches light TV viewers and cord cutters, most of whom are in the most desirable demographics.

The 2nd annual “newfronts” presentations that are making the rounds now, just before May’s broadcast TV and cable annual upfront-negotiation extravaganzas for the coming fall season. A precursor to this was Google’s adaptation in November of a TV-like audience measurement that gives advertisers a way to make apples-to-apples comparisons with traditional TV. Through Nielsen or comScore tagging, advertisers can track things such as the number of people who see the ads and how often they are exposed. It also provides demographic data about who views the ads, which is how YouTube is offering guarantees. Regardless of which platform or channel it is viewed, the high consumer engagement of visual content has got marketers’ attention and investment. Along with the ad budget, they are committing TV-sized funds around production as well. To illustrate the viral nature of compelling video ad storytelling, the 10 most-shared ads of 2013 generated 28.8 million shares between them—a 52.1% increase from 2012 (19 million).

How Small Businesses Play in the Video Realm

For small businesses on limited budgets, quality production only enhances the great story that has to exist from the get-go, directed at the right audience. They can range from client testimonials, to behind-the-scenes sharing, or “How I got into ____” story. Check out these tips from onSMB and more tips from SmartShoot for great ways to incorporate video into your small-business marketing strategy.

So many videos, so little time

Returning to the Shutterstock video, you may be thinking, no way I’d dedicate 19 hours of my month (on average) to video! Most likely your children are carrying most of the weight on that statistic, but you are exposed to much more video than you likely are aware. No doubt, included in the count are the ones that play instantly, but are not really viewed or even seen. (eMarketer reports video ad completion rates of roughly 47% overall, so there still is much work to be done by brands and buyers to deliver relevant ads to engaged audiences.) Still, those are remarkable numbers.

According to Citrix’s “A Day in the Life of a Modern Smartphone User,” infographic, which features lots of interesting mobile stats, 32% of social media is made up of videos. These statistics have inspired changes at both social and web portals. Facebook and Twitter purchased microvideo networks – Instagram and Vine, respectively – and are devoting more one-click video real estate right in the user feed. The portal sites are not standing idly by either. Yahoo is jockeying to come up with a YouTube competitor, and AOL just announced a comprehensive site make-over that positions it to become a video-ad powerhouse. AOL wants to own the video spaceEven the print and online news business is jumping into the fray; both the New York Times and Wall Street Journal are investing heavily in video content for their digital properties and will be presenting at NewFronts this year. The Seattle Times (where I am employed) is dabbling in providing video news content and currently offers pre-roll video advertising with an option to extend that reach through partner sites.

 

Mobile Video

The growth of online video viewing on mobile also deserves notice. According to Shutterstock/comScore, 8% of videos (1 in 12) were watched via mobile in 2012; in 2013 that frequency jumped to 1 in 6 (16%), and this trend isn’t showing any signs of slowing. The Citrix study, also done in January of this year, claims 20% of smartphone users use their phones to view video. Half of them are served display banner ads, which now account for 2% of mobile volume, but only one in 20 is served a video ad.

While still in its infancy, marketers have high expectations for mobile and mobile outreach is being promoted as one of the most direct ways to reach target audiences. That said, most still aren’t seeing the kind value parity that would justify investment; it’s still just not as good in the minds of advertisers, according to Forrester Research, as the oft-maligned display advertising. In truth, most don’t have a mobile strategy, let alone one strictly for mobile video, yet no one thinks mobile advertising is going to get smaller over the next few years.


For more stats on video viewing across devices, check out these highlights from the 2014 Experian Cross Device Video Analysis.


2014 Nielsen Scarborough Report on Mobile Ad-friendly ShoppersOne of the main challenges is finding those who are open to mobile advertising. Nielsen Scarborough offers up this infographic on Reaching Mobile Ad-Friendly Shoppers_ 2014 as a testimony to that potential. It appears life events such as getting married, having a baby, buying a home or changing jobs are the key factors to engaging ad-accepting mobile shoppers. (As a side note, infographics such as Scarborough’s and the previous one from Citrix are a very effective promotion tool for businesses that have access to data that can be transformed into attention-grabbing stories.)

Seattle-Tacoma Video-Ad Market Potential

So how does all this video viewing play out in the Seattle market? According to the 2013 Nielsen Scarborough Research Report, the Seattle-Tacoma DMA market – 17 counties in Western Washington –  outpaces the top-50 DMAs in the nation for technology ownership and is #1 for PC ownership.

Seattle leads the nation in PC ownership
No wonder, then, that it also tops the nation for Internet access in the past month at 89%. As a tech-savvy market, one would think it would be a leader in video-viewing too, but it only ranks 12th – about even for the market’s size – for engaging with video content, with nearly 1.3M adults viewing each month, but much lower for doing so on a smartphone or tablet.

Seattle's rank for video viewing by device
The high use of PCs might have something more to do with so many in the market being employed in the software industry rather than device preference. They have ready access to viewing from both work and home, therefore making it unnecessary to waste battery power viewing on their mobile devices.

These findings tend to match the video ad-spending trends in the marketplace. According to Borrell Associates, advertisers from inside the Seattle-Tacoma DMA spent 16% of their online budgets on video ads in 2013.Video share of S-T DMA ad dollars 16 percent
As the graphic below shows, the Seattle market is behind on investment in video, spending nearly 4% less than is typically allocated nationally, and relying more on email and display ROS. Video spending was $64,170,000 in 2013; that amount is expected to increase 125% by 2018, hitting $144.6 million.Ad video spending in the Seattle Market vs the nation
In a March 2014 survey conducted by American Opinion Research (AOR) on behalf of The Seattle Times, 87% of local online users access the Internet during the average week and 66% daily. The study concluded that catching up with news and information is the primary reason for going online in this market, with watching videos a strong (and growing) second and emailing a link or video third. Coming in at the 6th position is viewing photo galleries, which almost always is preceded by a video ad. That pretty much reflects the national trends.

Why people go online
Be the customer

If nothing else is apparent from the rapidly evolving world of visual and video engagement, it is abundantly clear that traditional marketing efforts are not enough to stay competitive. Marketing no longer is something you push at a customer; it’s something you do with them and that requires putting yourself in their shoes. Video will certainly help you connect at that level.

So much is happening in the video realm right now, it is difficult to keep pace with all the changes and announcements. In researching this post, I was taken in a new direction daily, if not hourly(!) and I expect even more news will transpire before I publish it. Not every platform or option will be right, but spending the time to find the visual angle to your business’ story and experimenting with different content formats not only will add spark to an already strong marketing strategy, but will boost awareness, engagement and, potentially, conversions. Video is an easy route to creating buzz and the right campaign integrated into your other marketing efforts can quickly generate referrals, friends, fans and followers.

How about you? Is video advertising in your future? What questions do you need answered to become a believer? Are you already a superstar at video promotion? Share your successes in the comments section below!

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

We are eager to pro­vide you with the knowl­edge and tools you need to nav­i­gate the Seat­tle media mar­ket. If you have any ques­tions, we encour­age you to reach out; we’ve got answers! Con­tact us at seattlemediamaven@seattletimes.com

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Seattle Seahawks Super Bowl Afterglow: BOOMtown http://www.seattlemediamaven.com/2014/02/28/seattle-seahawks-afterglow-boomtown/ http://www.seattlemediamaven.com/2014/02/28/seattle-seahawks-afterglow-boomtown/#respond Fri, 28 Feb 2014 13:06:39 +0000 http://www.seattlemediamaven.com/?p=895 In the summer of 2012, at the height of the possibility of a return of an NBA basketball team to the Seattle market, I suggested the city needed to quit focusing on the challenges that come with building a new arena (and NBA and NHL franchises) and open its visionary eyes to the opportunities and...

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Richard Sherman salutes the 12th-Man after intercepting a pass. Photo: The Seattle Times

Richard Sherman salutes the 12th-Man after intercepting a pass. Photo: The Seattle Times

In the summer of 2012, at the height of the possibility of a return of an NBA basketball team to the Seattle market, I suggested the city needed to quit focusing on the challenges that come with building a new arena (and NBA and NHL franchises) and open its visionary eyes to the opportunities and rewards that come with a full complement of professional sports teams. While that dream was quashed, if only temporarily, the recent Seattle Seahawks Super Bowl win was a dazzling show of the possibilities, not the least of which is a highly engaged community.

 Seattle Seahawks Win Builds Community

Victory Parade

Photo: Seattle DOT

And what an impressive show of community it was, as even the non-football fans got caught up in the frenzy and declared, “I’m In!”; those not engaged by the 12th Man mindset certainly were the exception. When the Big Game arrived, the streets of Seattle were nearly vacant. It is estimated 6 in 10 Western Washington televisions and nearly all (92%) TV sets turned on that afternoon were tuned into the Super Bowl. (One might surmise that the TVs not turned on belonged to those who were watching in bars and at friends’ parties.) Nationally, it was the most-watched television event ever with 111.5 million average viewers, only 2.5 million of whom were in this market. (Average viewership actually was 112.6 million if you include the 528,000 who watched on digital platforms via FOX Sports GO and FOXSports.com and the 561,000 who watched the Spanish-language feed on FOX Deportes.) Where were all those TV-viewing eyeballs located?

  • Kansas City (58.1% of TVs/78% of TV viewers), presumably to enjoy a Denver loss
  • Seattle (56.7/92)
  • Indianapolis (53.9/74)
  • New Orleans (53.2/72)
  • Tulsa (52.9/71)
  • Las Vegas (52.575)
  • Portland (52.4/82)
  • Knoxville (52.3/68)
  • Jacksonville (52.0/68)
  • Denver (51.4/83)
  • Tampa (51.4/71)

Even more remarkable: with the Seahawks dominating in the 43–8 drubbing of the Denver Broncos from the first 12-seconds on – the largest margin of victory in a Super Bowl in 21 years – Nielsen estimates that only 5% of the audience had tuned out by the closing minutes of the game!

The next day, The Seattle Times did an overrun of 125,000 newspapers that sold out by mid-morning. That same day online, Seattletimes.com readers spent 2.3 million minutes on the site reliving the win. An additional sold-out run of 35,000 print copies of the Monday paper were distributed on Tuesday. On Wednesday, schools and businesses emptied as hundreds of thousands of fans and spectators riding the ebullient wave filled the downtown sector – on street, in office, at retail venues, from hotel windows and building rooftops – to watch the victory parade as it wound through town to the packed CenturyLink field (with overrun viewing from Safeco field). Thousands more watched on TV, live streams online or followed the action via social-media feeds. Weeks later, houses, offices and cars remain adorned with Seahawks regalia. No one is ready to leave the afterglow and they remain buoyed by the promise that the Seahawks are going all the way again next season.

Everyone Wins!

No denying, the civic and city-brand enrichment was a much-needed and overdue boost to the greater Seattle psyche, but the real winner was the local economy. There was the consumer-spending lift throughout the winning season of sold-out games and all the trickle-down from that, not the least of which was charitable fundraising from signed football memorabilia. I personally witnessed the $6,000 auction purchase of a Russell Wilson-signed football after the 49er playoff win! Not only does a winning team make us more generous, apparently a winning season increases the personal income of every Seattleite. In 2008, the journal Economic Inquiry published the results of a study, A Winning Proposition: The Economic Impact of Successful National Football League Franchises, that concluded “a winning percentage of the local professional football team had a significant positive effect on real per-capita personal income” of the individuals in the franchise city. Please let me know if that pencils out for you!

12th Man and Beast Mode Score Extra Business

Dick's Drive-in 12th man from Dick's Facebook page

Photo: Dick’s Drive In Facebook page

Both big and small businesses found ways to leverage the frenzy and boost business. Dick’s Drive-in, which happened to be celebrating its 60th anniversary at the same time, put its service team in 12th-Man/60th anniversary blue and green t‑shirts that also were for sale at the restaurant and online. They promoted their 12th fandom, encouraged others to participate and offered a special 12-cent cheeseburger through its social-media channels, scoring thousands of new Facebook fans and burger sales. A local food-tour company added a 12th-Man tour that stopped at eateries offering 12th-Man snacks. And a Puyallup butcher, Blue Max Meats, took a gamble on Skittles-infused Beast Mode hot sausage and sold out batch after batch, game after game – more than 3,000 pounds and still selling at four times the usual pace — covering their start-up costs in three months. The innovative tactics could fill a book of case studies, but needless to say, the Seattle entrepreneurial spirit also put in a peak performance!

Seattle Media in Hawk Heaven

Seattle Seahawks quarterback Russell Wilson at the victory parade

Russell Wilson shares The Seattle Times cover with the victory parade crowd.

From a local media perspective, as the wins mounted, advertiser interest grew along with the fan frenzy. By the time the Super Bowl arrived, FOX had sold out its spots in this market to the tune of $200,000 a pop. Nearly all the media put together their own version of a Super Bowl special, and The Seattle Times special content attracted seven-figures in new and additional revenue with its pre- and post-Super Bowl coverage. Retailers snapped up tens of thousands of the Seattle Times-produced full-season souvenir book, Hawk Heaven, for resale, and The Times store has sold thousands more, along with t‑shirts, plaques and posters. While newspaper always has been the merchandising medium, its power to move product was proven in spades as anything that one could slap a logo on – t‑shirt, plate, train, cuckoo clock, teddy bears – you name it, was offered in one full-page, full-color ad after another.

Seattle Broke into the National Consciousness with a (Legion of) BOOM!

As a North American sport, one can only grin at the oft-used claim (yes you, Steve Raible) of “World Champion” football team, but who am I to argue semantics amid the civic joy? That said, with all the exposure as Super Bowl victor and can-do team, interest in our region certainly was piqued. That engagement extends to tourism, attracting employers and quality employees, and focuses investment eyes on Seattle’s relatively healthy economy, its diverse industries and highly educated workforce, and its supportive infrastructure for innovation and growth. In an interview with The Seattle Times business columnist Jon Talton, Seattle Chamber chief of staff Eric Schinfeld commented on the “halo effect” of a winning team and the highly documented 12th Man, calling them “city ambassadors” whose global reach is priceless. The most pressing issue now is how to extend that immense goodwill beyond the football season!

New Standard Set for Social Media

And who would like to guess the social-media contribution the brand called Richard Sherman alone brought to the area? After the 49er playoff win, he set social media ablaze with an emotional vent that scored millions of YouTube views followed by millions more social-media interactions chronicling not only why he did it, but why he is worthy of both admiration and high praise.

On Twitter, and just for the Big Game, 24.9 million tweets were registered – the biggest U.S. live TV event on the social-media site. And on Facebook, more than 50 million people interacted 185 million times via posts, comments and Likes during the game. As Sherman said, “don’t you open your mouth about the best!” Even the Huffington Post jumped on that emotional proclamation, coming up with “36 Reasons Seattle Not Only Won the Super Bowl, But Also Wins at Life.”
Boom!

 

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